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TJB
05-26-2008, 12:20 PM
A future project planned is the T/C from Projects in Metal by Glen Wilson. Has anyone built this grinder and if so how well does it work. HF has a clone of the Deckel and does anyone have experience with it? Thanks, Thomas

DICKEYBIRD
05-26-2008, 01:20 PM
John Moran has posted some info on that machine on his site. Doesn't sound too good as he sent his back.
http://www.gadgetbuilder.com/CutterGrinder.html

Bill Pace
05-26-2008, 01:32 PM
No direct experience with the HF/Deckel grinder clone, but have read MANY reports on it -- and the several others like it -- and the overall opinion is it is not so good for what most of us would use it for ... end mill sharpening. Was designed for -- single point sharpening? -- some of the others can expound on that, and can apparently do a so-so job on the ends of the EM's but nothing for the flutes. I dont recall ever reading of anyone being really satisfied with it.

The little grinder by Glen Wilson has always fascinated me also, it looks like it has possibilities, and made up of plate, no castings. I went so far as to build up a -- hybrid? of it, a mix of Glens and Guy Lautards with an attempt at an air spindle out of one of the cheapo spin indexes. I had found the exact motor Glen used, but it was sorely underpowered and used a HF trim router and one of their speed controls for drive ... sort of a Frankenstein! Aside from the air spindle not coming out as hoped, it worked pretty good, and I was about to get it all assembled into one bolted together piece when I ran up on a REAL T&G, a Cuttermaster, that I couldnt pass up, so I sorta shuffled the "Frankenstein" aside...... maybe someday...

http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b301/pace1980/beltsander.jpg

Chipslinger
05-26-2008, 01:50 PM
Rube Goldberg Lives.:)

3t-
05-26-2008, 02:25 PM
Sorry if this is a Hijack...

Bill where did you pick up the pulleys and flat belt on your Frankenstein?

Bill Pace
05-26-2008, 02:52 PM
Thats not a flat belt, its a wee "v" belt, from Mcmaster-Carr, in --I think?-- 2L size. And the pullys I turned up on the lathe...stuff left over from the little underpowered motor, if I were to put it in use I would change the pulley sizes to rein in the extreme rpm's of that little router. When I bring rpm's down with the speed control the power/torque suffers

Alistair Hosie
05-26-2008, 03:17 PM
very nice design and workmanship Bill well done I like the metalworking holder for the cutter wheel regards Alistair

Chipslinger
05-26-2008, 04:41 PM
Does the psudo air float spindle work?

Bill Pace
05-26-2008, 08:56 PM
Alistair, that is almost a direct copy of that part of Glen Wilson grinder -- bout the only thing:rolleyes: ... its quite an interesting design.

Chipslinger, the "psuedo" air spindle would come close to functioning at very low air pressure, 5-10psi, but was finicky and would tend to 'come & go'. From the moment I got that thing, I marveled at the ease with which it would rotate and the seemingly tight tolerances, so it seemed a natural to try a air spindle on it. I think if I was a little more skilled at machining it would be a doable project.

TJB
05-26-2008, 10:09 PM
Thanks for the input. The Air Spindle is based on another issue of HSM (Sep/Oct 1987) which I don't have.....hint hint. Philip Duclos described it and a certain technique is referenced to..perhaps that is the in/out hunting being experienced. I'm looking for a copy of that issue before I start. I thought that the HF was to good to be true....usually is. In an air spindle, air replaces lubricant between the bearings and because of the pressure keeps out the grit ???? Thomas

JCHannum
05-26-2008, 10:19 PM
The details of the air spindle are in the book "The Shop Wisdom of Philip Duclos" available from Village Press. It is an excellent book and has many worthwhile projects, tips and information in it. In my opinion, it is one of the best VP books.

oldtiffie
05-27-2008, 12:50 AM
...................
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In an air spindle, air replaces lubricant between the bearings and because of the pressure keeps out the grit ???? Thomas

True.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_bearing#Air_bearings

http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=en&q=air+bearing&btnG=Google+Search&meta=

Norman Atkinson
05-27-2008, 04:25 AM
Wasting my time?