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hwingo
05-31-2008, 11:58 PM
Hi guys,

I will likely be moving to Alaska or Hawaii after 31 JUL. Either trip requires my home furnishings and shop equipment be transported via ocean. I am always concerned about rust and nothing brings greater harm than salt water or rapid changes in temperature. From the time the movers pick everything up, I won't see it again for nearly a month. Sadly, everything will sit in a 40 foot shipping container either in a trucking yard or a train yard baking in the sun until it's loaded on a ship. I've lived all over the world and nothing changes when it comes to moving. They promise the shipment will arrive in two weeks and your lucky to see it in a month and a half. Your even more fortunate if you haven't been stolen blind.

I was planning to cover my equipment in cosmoline for protection. However, the "coating" on my new equipment was not cosmoline, rather, something not as thick and easy to remove with mineral spirits.

If you were faced with an ocean voyage, what would you do to protect your equipment.

1. Is there a better product than cosmoline?

2. Would you crate everything in wood, cover with cosmoline and place a bag of silica gel inside each crate?

Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Harold

aostling
06-01-2008, 01:06 AM
I built a single wooden crate for moving my goods from California to New Zealand in 1971. That took almost three months to arrive. I also had a steamer trunk on board the ocean liner that took me there.

When I moved back from Wellington to Montana in 1978 ocean liners had ceased to exist. I sold most of my goods and mailed the rest in 10 kg. parcels. There were ten of these parcels, so I know that everything I owned weighed only 220 pounds (including my tools).

I advise against moving things like mattresses, sofas, etc., which can be bought anywhere.

What are you going to do, flip a coin to decide between Alaska and Hawaii?

mechanicalmagic
06-01-2008, 01:15 AM
If it were me, I'd coat EVERYTHING in LPS3.
Available from many tool dealers and suppliers.

Dave

Airkuld
06-01-2008, 03:16 AM
My old boss moved from West Allis, WI to the big island of Hawaii two years ago. He had a container dropped off at his house and he slowly loaded it over a month or so. He is a woodworker first and metal worker second so he built wooden cases/frames/support mechanisms around all of his tools. No special effort beyond a good cleaning and fresh lube was taken to prevent corosion and he didn't have a lick of trouble. Moving to Alaska is a dream of mine. I was in Anchorage in February a couple of years ago and it was warmer than it was in Milwaukee! Good luck to you.

JRouche
06-01-2008, 03:33 AM
Yup. LPS3 is the stuff you want. No better really. You will need several cans but it can be sprayed into every crevice and it really protects. Lay it on semi thick and be ready to clean it off afterwards. But its so much more cleaner and protective than laying on a coat of cosmoline... Like cosmoline in a spray can but better. I have some machines that lay dormant for some time. In a salt water atmosphere here and I have coated much of it in LPS3 and its saved my butt alot. JR

hwingo
06-01-2008, 10:04 AM
Moving to Alaska is a dream of mine. I was in Anchorage in February a couple of years ago and it was warmer than it was in Milwaukee! Good luck to you.

Three years ago I moved from Prince of Wales (POW), Alaska to a place northwest of Green Bay and regretted it ever since. POW is a federally designated wilderness area approximately 135 miles out in the Pacific due west of Ketchikan, AK. The only way to the island is by float plane or a "slow boat to China". So everything one needs is brought with them because you can't run down to the store and buy sheets or a couch. There are no such amenities on the island nor can you find such things in most of Southeast Alaska. To buy things as mattresses, one must fly to Ketichkan or Sitka and choose from a very limited variety.

Not only is POW warm (as is most of SE Alaska) but it's wet. We averaged slightly more than 200 (two hundred) inches of rain a year. Naturally, it's a saltwater environment but strangely our vehicles didn't rust as they do in Wisconsin. Wisconsin has literally ruined my cars!:mad:

Although I have been to Hawaii on may occasions, I was offered a preference of four locations Alaska being top choice and Hawaii a distant second. Hawaii is boring and has little to offer in the way of hunting, fishing, or camping. Alaska has big game, big fish, big mountains, big areas to camp, and BIG PERSONAL FREEDOM which ain't in Wisconsin. I will likely be assigned Alaska.:D

Getting back on track, tell me a little about LPS3. I bought new lathes and mill last year. On arrival there was a rather thick coat of protectant (but not as thick as the thinnest coat of cosmoline) on the machines. Parts, e.g., face plate, tool post, etc. were wrapped in brown paper that closely adhered to the parts ostensibly as a result of the protective petroleum-like coating applied to the parts.

The point is, this "stuff" was unlike grease. Sure, some would be transferred to the hands when first handling coated areas but it surely wasn't a slick, greasy wet-substance. Parts and surfaces could be easily handled without slipping from one's hands. It's best described as a dry, sticky petroleum-like substance that can easily be removed with mineral spirits. Additionally, if clothing got against a coated surface, transference of this substance was slight at most; had it been grease it would have been all over one's hands and clothing. I know you guys know what I am trying to describe.

Does LPS3 have the properties that I desire and I'm trying to describe. Does it have the dry, waxy feel like the substance on my new equipment?

Harold

boaterri
06-01-2008, 10:15 AM
You might try Boeshield (sp?) It is a rust preventitave made by Boeing.

Good luck,


Rick

fasto
06-01-2008, 01:10 PM
Does LPS3 have the properties that I desire and I'm trying to describe. Does it have the dry, waxy feel like the substance on my new equipment?

Harold

Yes.

You could also use a "VCI" paper for small items. This stuff is likely the "brown paper" that small tools are wrapped with. It gives off "Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors" over time. U-line sells it,
Anti-rust paper (http://www.uline.com/Browse_Listing_5250.asp?desc=VCI+Anti%2DRust+Paper )

Mcmaster sells self-stick dessicant bags that are made to go into 40-foot containers to keep the humidity under control. I'd put about 10x their recommended quantity (they're relatively cheap).

Mcmaster also sells LPS-3, boeshield, etc.

aostling
06-01-2008, 01:38 PM
I was offered a preference of four locations Alaska being top choice and Hawaii a distant second.
Harold

Harold,

What kind of a job have you got, that will pay your way to live on Prince of Wales?