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View Full Version : I Finally Bought an Anvil!



john hobdeclipe
06-19-2008, 04:27 PM
Got up Monday morning and immediately scanned the Craigslist ads. Found an ad for farrier's tools and supplies at 1/2 price or less. So I replied, and the guy called me and we arranged a time for me to see the stuff. I drove down and looked it all over, and this anvil followed me home.

http://www.auldooly.com/imagehost/MVC-470F8.jpg

It's a 125 pound Cliff Carroll, unused. And I got it for about 1/2 price! ($230.00) That's less than $2.00/pound...I've seen some pretty ratty anvils go for more than that.

So now I figure that anything I can't make with sufficient accuracy on my lathe I can batter into tolerance.

I'm busy now leveling and bricking a work area outside the shop (covered, of course) and as soon as I get that done I'll be moving this to it's permanent spot and we'll soon see just how much damage I can really do.

lynnl
06-19-2008, 04:32 PM
Wow, you got a bargain. Looks like about 1/2 price, based on Centaur's list.

http://www.centaurforge.com/products.asp?dept=144

snowman
06-19-2008, 04:54 PM
congratulations, now you have something to set things on like me!

It currently provides a very sturdy support to my hydraulic pipe bender!

I even left a pair of tongs at the scrapyard today because I just didn't see the point in hauling them home.

:(

Forrest Addy
06-19-2008, 05:37 PM
Look out Wiley Coyote.

miker
06-19-2008, 06:03 PM
I think we now simply must discuss how to correctly level the Anvil.

An Engineer's Master Level as a minimum I would think!

What about Longitudinal Twist?
Would it still be level if used on a ship??
Perhaps a photo of an Anvil on wheels!

Good find. Enjoy. :)

Rgds

MickeyD
06-19-2008, 06:10 PM
I spiked mine down to an old tree stump and then scraped it level. That is a whole lot easier than than trying to shim it straight and get all of the twist out.

thistle
06-19-2008, 07:48 PM
please dont use bar oil on it...

bruto
06-19-2008, 07:57 PM
I think we now simply must discuss how to correctly level the Anvil.

An Engineer's Master Level as a minimum I would think!

What about Longitudinal Twist?
Would it still be level if used on a ship??
Perhaps a photo of an Anvil on wheels!

Good find. Enjoy. :)

Rgds

Should it be scraped before or after leveling?

dpasek
06-19-2008, 09:00 PM
Should it be scraped before or after leveling?

I think it should be scrapped [sic] after leveling.:D

JRouche
06-19-2008, 09:30 PM
Whata good deal!! I always have my ear to the rail for a nice anvil somewhat local that they dont want an arm and an ear for. No such luck for me. That baby looks brand new.. Good score.. Ill keep hammering on my railroad rail till I get a score like that.. JR

beckley23
06-19-2008, 09:33 PM
No before, then you have a datum plane for the level.
Harry

Yankee1
06-20-2008, 12:24 AM
Now for a hardy and pritchel (not sure the spelling is correct)and some borax powder for welding. I lucked into an old crank type blower for my forge.
My forge is a brake drum with a band around it with three plates welded to it for legs. I only have a cheap Chinese anvil 55 pounds but its much better than none.
Chuck

Paul Alciatore
06-20-2008, 01:01 AM
What do ya mean level it? From the looks of it, when you mount it, it will just pull the earth into proper alignment under it.

Nice find.

oldtiffie
06-20-2008, 02:32 AM
Nice - very nice indeed.

Use it "as is". Make it "sing" - to back-ground music "Anvil Chorus" - fabulous music!!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anvil_Chorus

We have two quite successful "iron-workers" here, the names of which are: "Ironic Twist" and "Bent and Twisted".

I have had an interest in Black-smithing and "forge/torch and anvil work" for as long as I can remember. That and "glass-blowing" are things that I cannot resist watching - anywhere!! Real craftsmanship and challenge but hugely satisfying!!

I jumped at the opportunity to buy an excellent book (best I've seen) - paid AU$35 (say US$33) and I'd have paid double that!! - by a woman Black-smith (who really knows her stuff!!) - details are as the following pics and links.

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Black-smith_book1.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Black-smith_book2.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Black-smith_book3.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Black-smith_book4.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Black-smith_book5.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Black-smith_book6.jpg

mojojerry
06-20-2008, 12:23 PM
Anvils seem to be out of site. If you can use alittle smaller one. Its not near as pretty as the one we just looked at. Try Harbor freight. They have a 55pounder for $50.00. I am a wimp with a terible back. I am going to get the 15 pounder. mojo

john hobdeclipe
06-20-2008, 09:12 PM
Whata good deal!! I always have my ear to the rail for a nice anvil somewhat local that they dont want an arm and an ear for. No such luck for me. That baby looks brand new.. Good score.. Ill keep hammering on my railroad rail till I get a score like that.. JR

I certainly hope that the rail you keep your ear to is not the same one you hammer on!

Yes, it is new. The seller has had to stop doing horseshoeing for health reasons, and never had the chance to use this anvil after he bought it.

lazlo
06-20-2008, 09:19 PM
Anvils seem to be out of site.

At the price that iron/steel scrap is selling for these days, it's more amazing that John was able to find a new anvil for $2.00/pound!

.RC.
06-21-2008, 04:32 AM
The anvil we have has a hard surface that has been forge welded onto the top of the anvil.. Is this a common type of manufacture???

Doc Nickel
06-21-2008, 05:01 AM
The anvil we have has a hard surface that has been forge welded onto the top of the anvil.. Is this a common type of manufacture???

-It used to be.

Turn-of-the-century anvils were pretty much the pinnacle, if you will, of anvil technology. Metallurgy was getting sophisticated (for the time, anyway) and the automobile had not yet taken over and put all the horses out of business, so damn near everyone needed an anvil for shoeing, if nothing else.

So some of the best anvils came from this time- Trenton, Fisher, Mousehole, etc. There's over a hundred name brands from the day.

My 140lb Peter Wright dates to sometime before 1910, and I'm told it was made in three pieces: The "foot" or base, the main body including horn (both of wrought iron) and a faceplate of high-carbon "tool" steel were all forge-welded together and then quenched.

So you had a main body of relatively inexpensive wrought iron, with a wear plate of far harder tool steel welded to it.

However, this was a manpower-intensive job, and eventually steel got cheaper than labor. Anvils eventually started being drop-forged from continuous steel (usually less hard on the face, but no problems with the face cracking off either) but these didn't last long as the advent of the car (and WW2) pretty well obsoleted the horse, so fewer and fewer people needed blacksmithy equipment.

With less demand, production fell, and without the economies of scale, costs went up or quality had to go down- or other corners had to be cut.

So now, many anvils were made from dirt-cheap cast iron; some good grey iron, most black iron that was almost just the tailings of the pour. These cast anvils would have a thin- about 3/16"- plate of hard steel on the face, sometimes cast in (which was difficult and tricky) or usually brazed on.

These anvils are functional, and will give a casual user many years of service, but they're still not as good as the old wrought anvils.

No one makes two-piece anvils today. Almost all anvils are solid cast steel (except the Harbor Freight junk, which are useless cats iron) with one German maker still drop-forging a limited number of anvils each year.

Doc.