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Peter N
07-02-2008, 07:59 AM
Not quite like the 10 Poms to Australia back in the 50's, but apparantly the province of Alberta is on a huge recruitment drive over here in the UK to try and get skilled labour to emigrate.

All over breakfast TV this morning apparently, and quite a few newspapers too. Telegraph story here: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/2225860/Canada-wants-British-workers-to-emigrate.html

So Evan, Russ, and others may be getting a Brit invasion soon:D
Don't know if we could put up with your rather cold winters though.

Peter

Evan
07-02-2008, 10:33 AM
We have plenty of Scots here including my wife's mother's side. Don't know about Englishmen though. You can always tell an expatriot Scot because they never lose their accent. I wouldn't worry about the winters too much, it's warming up these days... :D

Swarf&Sparks
07-02-2008, 11:02 AM
Montcalm and Wolfe?

I'll gladly trade you the 2 to kill the bark beetles. I'm freezing here at 5!
I came from 62 N to 32 S to get away from the bloody cold, but it's followed me.

hardtail
07-02-2008, 01:04 PM
Yes it was recently in the news, seems if you have relations here you can apply to have them come over and bypass the majority of immigration red tape for a 2 year stint, at least thats the jist I came up with off a 20 sec news blurb........It actually is a little slow momentarily as we are in a little gap between projects (lots of foundation work taking place at the moment) before it starts up again. Wages are good and probably average~ $35hr for most trades but the cost of living has rocketed over the last 5 yrs as well.

I think their target immigrants are poorer developed countries hoping to lure people into the service industry and other unskilled jobs.......When I started working as a kid I had the pleasure to work with some european WW2 and post fellas, most I would term craftsmen over tradesman, would be nice to attract more.........smile.

dp
07-02-2008, 01:05 PM
Looks like a good time to buy property in Hinton while it's still affordable. Once those folks discover the glacier highway between Jasper and Banff they'll never go back home.

Swarf&Sparks
07-02-2008, 01:07 PM
There's a Banff in Canada too? :eek:

dp
07-02-2008, 01:12 PM
There's a Banff in Canada too? :eek:

Sure - here's some pix I took while riding my Harley from Seattle to Jasper and on to Sturgis.

http://thevirtualbarandgrill.com/gallery/rtts2000

Swarf&Sparks
07-02-2008, 01:32 PM
I was takin the p1ss, DP
are you aware the original is in Scotland?

dp
07-02-2008, 01:51 PM
I was takin the p1ss, DP
are you aware the original is in Scotland?

Of course - The Canadians have drawn deep from the well of the Scots for naming places (Calgary and Nova Scotia, 'frinstance). I just liked the excuse to see those pix of my HD in the Canadian Rockies again. That is one spectacular road.

Swarf&Sparks
07-02-2008, 01:54 PM
That is some spectacular country!
I'd love to see it but the cold would kill me :(

Lew Hartswick
07-02-2008, 02:13 PM
That is some spectacular country!
I'd love to see it but the cold would kill me :(
So go in the summer. We did the big loop from Winnepeg out through that bit of country
back in the 60s somewhere, It's sure pretty, Jasper, Banff, Yoho, Also did the Alaska
highway when sister-inlaw lived up there. That was even longer ago.
...lew...

Swarf&Sparks
07-02-2008, 02:17 PM
Thanks Lew, but when the minimum here gets down to 20 I'm freezing.
And I might hafta eat Thrud's sister's meatloaf! :eek:

Anyone heard from the big guy lately?

Jim Caudill
07-02-2008, 03:22 PM
What is a POM and why does it cost (or did cost) 10pounds? I only speak A,mericun type English. I know what a POS stands for or PITA, but not POM.

Swarf&Sparks
07-02-2008, 03:31 PM
Pom, dunno, what's worse, dunno why they're called pommie bastards. :confused:

Only call em pommy bastards if ya like em.
Then there's the jocks, paddies, taffs.....
Was a time, if the engineer's name wasn't Mc xxx
you didn't sail :D

Whether across the Atlantic by steam, or over the top to Hamburg, Murmansk.....

Jim Caudill
07-02-2008, 03:40 PM
"Was a time, if the engineer's name wasn't Mc xxx you didn't sail"

Interesting, wonder if that is why the "Enterprise" on Star-Trek had "Scotty" for the ship's engineer (even though his character name was Montgomery Scott).

Evan
07-02-2008, 03:55 PM
My daughter and family live in Hinton. She is a professional photographer and does a lot of weddings in the area. She is absolutely spoiled rotten by the scenery.

Here are a few pics I took a few years ago on our way through the Banff-Jasper hiway.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics4/bj1.jpg

http://vts.bc.ca/pics4/bj2.jpg

http://vts.bc.ca/pics4/bj4.jpg

http://vts.bc.ca/pics4/bjmod.jpg

Swarf&Sparks
07-02-2008, 03:58 PM
Magnificent country
looks like the vertical bits of Scotland.
(highlands?)
;)

Evan
07-02-2008, 04:05 PM
It's a bit more vertical than Scotland. It's very hard to get an idea of the scale of things but this image helps a bit.


http://vts.bc.ca/pics4/bj5.jpg

Swarf&Sparks
07-02-2008, 04:16 PM
'bout time the south pacific scotsmen chimed in here
where's the kiwis when ya need em?

Most of NZ is pretty vertical, just about fit in a corner of BC or WA though :D

Peter N
07-02-2008, 04:34 PM
'bout time the south pacific scotsmen chimed in here
where's the kiwis when ya need em?

Most of NZ is pretty vertical, just about fit in a corner of BC or WA though :D

Mainly South Island, but they're all sheep farmers there, no machinists unless you count creative uses for #8 wire :D

Mind you the North Island has a few steep 'uns too. I drove up Ruapehu a few years back on the Ohakune mountain road and got scared s***less. Peeing down with rain, single track mountain pass/road, into cloud cover at a very low level so I could see bugger all, and no barriers (not even a verge..) on the side with huge vertical drops. Kiwis coming down the other way must have had Radar, as they were all driving like it was a rally, and I don't know how I didn't crash into about seventeen of them.

Peter

Peter N
07-02-2008, 04:41 PM
What is a POM and why does it cost (or did cost) 10pounds? I only speak A,mericun type English. I know what a POS stands for or PITA, but not POM.

Not sure of the origins of Pom, but the 10 was the cost of an assisted passage on a ship over there, paid for by the Australian government, in a very successful effort to boost immigration in the 1950s.
Somewhere around 1.5-2 million Brits went out there then.
Story here http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7217889.stm

Peter

Swarf&Sparks
07-02-2008, 04:47 PM
Yup, them kiwi roads are a bugger!
http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b387/idgara_eng/kiwicaravan.jpg

Oldbrock
07-02-2008, 04:56 PM
I'll pass if I want and I'll pass if I don't want, so there:eek:

Swarf&Sparks
07-02-2008, 04:59 PM
Yup, and I don't spose you had anything to do with the .243 holes in the sign?
:cool:

Alistair Hosie
07-02-2008, 05:02 PM
My son Alistair he did law at university law honors grad but will consider many things is thinking of going to Canada and has thought of it any advise would be welcome regards Alistair

Peter S
07-02-2008, 07:34 PM
'bout time the south pacific scotsmen chimed in here
where's the kiwis when ya need em?

re. importing Poms; working on the principle of "if you can't say something nice, better keep quiet" - I better keep quiet! :D

aostling
07-02-2008, 07:37 PM
re. importing Poms; working on the principle of "if you can't say something nice, better keep quiet" - I better keep quiet! :D

In the early 1970s New Zealand had a "Punch a Pom a Day" campaign. It was just a joke, of course, but there were some worried Englishmen back home who wondered if it was safe to immigrate.

Jim Caudill
07-02-2008, 08:21 PM
According to an article from Wikipedia, POM or Pommy is slang for reference to the British people. The article explains several popular theories for how the term came into use. Here is one:
"The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) strongly supports the theory that pommy originated as a contraction of "pomegranate".[1] The OED also suggests that the reason for this is that pomegranate is extinct Australian rhyming slang for immigrant; it cites an article from 14 November 1912, in a once-prominent Australian weekly magazine The Bulletin: "The other day a Pummy Grant (assisted immigrant) was handed a bridle and told to catch a horse." A popular alternative explanation for the theory that pommy is a contraction of "pomegranate", relates to the purported frequency of sunburn among British people in Australia, turning their fair skin the colour of pomegranates.[2] However, there is no hard evidence for the theory regarding sunburn."

oldtiffie
07-02-2008, 09:42 PM
A couple of quite probable meanings etc. of "POM" as referred to Englishmen/women in Australia.

1.
"Peaches and Cream" complexions in the harsh OZ climate was likened to that of pomegranate fruit. "Poms" were also known a "New Chums".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pomegranate

2.
OZ was originally settled by England as a number of convict settlements. Most prisoners were English and Irish.

The convicts were called "Prisoners of Mother England" (POM's).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AUSTRALIA
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convicts_in_Australia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:Search?search=australian+convict+settlemen t&fulltext=Search

English "assisted migration" (Ten quid Pom's) was largely very successful, but many referred to or regarded the "locals" (OZ) as crude/ex-(or descended from) convicts/Colonials/that needed to know their place and be put in or stay in it. Some seemed to never stop complaining that "back home" it was better in every way and they wished that they had never come and some did "go back "Home".

Needless to say this vast minority of "Poms" (aka "Whinge-ing/Whining Poms") did not endear themselves to the "locals" or most of their fellow Pom immigrants.

I have many friends who are Poms and proud of it - as they should be. Most settled in very well and made a very good "go" of it and were and are fine citizens.

Some of the finest people and tradesmen I ever met were "Poms".

And yes - at long last we have gotten over our "cultural cringe" and acknowledge and stopped denying that what we are is largely due to those convict fore-bears of ours who were incarcerated and "transported" and jailed by "Poms".

By and large, "Poms", which ever description you use, have been and are a great asset here in OZ - as have immigrants from every country and continent on the globe.

I hope this helps.

oldtiffie
07-02-2008, 10:39 PM
This "Google" link will assist with clarifying the word "Pom".

The post WW2 "assisted passage" migration also referred to "Poms" but the term is older than that.

http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=en&q=%22prisoner+of+mother+england%22&meta=