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Ian B
07-16-2008, 02:53 AM
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/FLYPRESS_W0QQitemZ260262711290QQcmdZViewItem?hash= item260262711290&_trksid=p3286.m14.l1318

He might at least have taken it off the pallet he sprayed it on.

There again, with a user name like that, maybe not...

Ian

jacampb2
07-16-2008, 03:21 AM
What the heck is it for? And is a more garish shade of blue available anywhere?

Ian B
07-16-2008, 03:42 AM
I think he uses it for putting the lids back on cans of garish blue paint

Ian

Peter N
07-16-2008, 03:52 AM
What the heck is it for?

It's a screw operated press, very common over here in the UK.

http://www.flypress.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flypress

Peter

Circlip
07-16-2008, 03:54 AM
It's a hand operated power press without having to resort to electrics. Used for punching and bending, a manual Ironworker.

Regards Ian

Ian B
07-16-2008, 04:11 AM
The trick is to swing the handle so that you deliver a blow of the right force to the punch tool, AND smack a co-worker standing behind the press in the back of the head at the same time. This makes his teeth fly out - hence the name 'flypress'

John Stevenson
07-16-2008, 04:27 AM
It's a screw operated press, very common over here in the UK.

http://www.flypress.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flypress

Peter

You trying to grab Tiffies job ?

.

Davek0974
07-16-2008, 04:49 AM
At least he taped the thread up :)

Must be a pro !

oldtiffie
07-16-2008, 04:49 AM
It's a screw operated press, very common over here in the UK.



Quite so Peter, as the screw-operated press here is the Woman's magazines - very "common".

bollie7
07-16-2008, 05:26 AM
The trick is to swing the handle so that you deliver a blow of the right force to the punch tool, AND smack a co-worker standing behind the press in the back of the head at the same time. This makes his teeth fly out - hence the name 'flypress'

Love it.!!

bollie7

tiptop
07-16-2008, 01:56 PM
I have one of these. Mine is a 15 ton model, just a little bigger. They work great for blacksmithin work and forming tin. Coppretta could probably use one this size quite well for form work on copper. Jay

Herm Williams
07-17-2008, 12:51 AM
I have seen them listed as coining press. Other than being slow they work fine.
re

NickH
07-17-2008, 03:59 AM
The flypress gives very precise control, the first one I saw in use was at the Kelham Island Industrial Museum in Sheffield, a guy who makes surgical equipment and knives was stamping the blades with his maker's mark.
Ron Reill also gives some great examples of what you can do with a Fly Press
http://www.abana.org/ronreil/flypress.shtml
http://www.abana.org/ronreil/smallpress1.jpg
I have a moderately sized Fly Press but am still building tooling & learning to use it,
Regards,
Nick

oldtiffie
07-17-2008, 05:41 AM
We used to use them in the Tool-Room to prove the punch-die-bolster set-up-up after manufacture, modification, sharpening, maintenance etc.

Its not so much the power to punch in those circumstances as the accuracy with which you can set and "creep" the ram/punch in the die-set.

That fine screw was very finely adjustable.

After the operation was proved the die-set went to the work-shop it was for and very skilled "Die-Setters" (re)set them up.

They were very handy shop presses as well as the ability to finely control and to "bump" was very handy as was the fine travel adjustment for press-fitting stuff. They had a distinct "feel" which the hydraulic presses never had.

madman
07-17-2008, 09:23 AM
The English used them years ago before they discovered the Canadian Fly Swatters.