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apd855
07-26-2008, 04:58 PM
I installed a coolant system on my 4x6 import vertical band saw and have a question. I am using a 14 tpi blade running at 200 fpm using water as coolant and I did some test cuts on a piece of 2 1/2" unknown round. Without coolant it took 6 minutes to cut and with coolant it took twice as long, one would think those numbers would be opposite. Am I missing something.

Peter N
07-26-2008, 05:07 PM
Well it is possible that at 200fpm on a piece on unknown material may well have blunted or broken some teeth on the saw.
That speed on the 4x6 is probably fine for aluminium, but on steel you might want to run it at 100fpm or less.

Peter

bobw53
07-26-2008, 06:45 PM
I'm going to jump on the soapbox for a second.

First water isn't a coolant as far as machining goes, yes it cools, but it doesn't lubricate. What you need is a proper "coolant". And a bandsaw is the most important place to have a proper "coolant". You need an oil that promotes metal to metal contact and lubricates. Find a coolant with the highest percentage of chlorine or chlorinated parafins you can get. These act as a microscopic lubricant. They will actually combine with your material under heat and pressure to create iron chloride or aluminum chloride or titanium chloride, these molecule thick coatings act much as a Tin, TiCN, or TiAlN coating on an endmill or insert. They also do the same exact thing as sulfur in a sulfurized oil, except they come into play at about 400 degrees less, somewhere in the 700-900 degree range.

Also did you break in your blade? When you get them they are just too damn sharp, and you should run them at a low speed and a very slow feed to slightly dull them. A couple of long slow cuts through some mild steel will greatly increase your blade life.

gnm109
07-26-2008, 08:11 PM
I installed a coolant system on my 4x6 import vertical band saw and have a question. I am using a 14 tpi blade running at 200 fpm using water as coolant and I did some test cuts on a piece of 2 1/2" unknown round. Without coolant it took 6 minutes to cut and with coolant it took twice as long, one would think those numbers would be opposite. Am I missing something.

I have a 7X12 vintage Enco Horizontal bandsaw. It has a tank underneath with a pump for the built-in coolant system. It holds about 4 gallons of water. To the water, I add a cup of Mobil soluble oil to act as a lubrcant and a cup of lysol to keep from growing algae.

It works very well and the blades seem to last a long time. I use some 105-1/2 inch bi-metallic blades with similar tooth count to yours. I got a lifetime supply with the saw.

Your saw should cut much better with some lubricant added to the water. Plain water is not a good lubricant and furthermore, will subject your saw to the risk of rust and corrosion.

rebel54
07-26-2008, 08:18 PM
You need to add a water soluable oil to the water. However if you were cutting D2 tool steel, it cuts better without this coolant.

wierdscience
07-26-2008, 09:35 PM
Your blade may infact be toast after that first cut.120sfpm is about the max for mild steel 1018,1020 etc.

The best coolant I have found so far is-

http://www.synlube-mi.com/Templates/coolant_king.htm

KBC,MSC etc carry it.

beckley23
07-26-2008, 10:08 PM
I never cut an unknown metal on my bandsaw unless I'm willing to buy a new band, and I tell my customers the same thing.
Observe the break in period for new bands, your bands will last a lot longer. I use only Bi-metal bands, and water soluble oil as a coolant.
As far as cutting speeds are concerned, I've got a Do All speed chart posted next to the saw. The only time I get under 200FPM is when I'm cutting a tool steel or an alloy steel, but let your experience be your guide.
Get the coarsest tooth count your saw can handle, but always keep 3 teeth in the cut. If you can use a variable pitch band, so much the better.
Harry

apd855
07-26-2008, 10:10 PM
Been using this blade dry for the last 6 months without any problems. I added the coolant system last week and other than the time difference in cuts everything is fine. I repeated the test cuts 4 times with the same results so I don't think it's the blade. With the coolant flooding the cut I get a better finish but I only use the saw for rough cuts, so maybe I'll just use it dry.

torker
07-26-2008, 11:14 PM
Im a scrounge.. I've cut lots of "mystery metal" that work hardens if you use coolant.