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Boucher
08-27-2008, 04:18 PM
I need to drill some small holes 0.043" Can't find my tool that holds small drills that goes into the Drill press chuck. Need to order another one and can't remember what they are called. Spent most of the last eight months in the hospital and the old noggin don't work right. Help would be appreciated.

lane
08-27-2008, 06:57 PM
Some people use pin vise`s I use a small 0 -5/32 drill chuck, with a 3/8 straight shank.

38_Cal
08-27-2008, 11:31 PM
And if you gotta have it done yesterday, lathe drill a piece of 3/8" scrap bar stock with the drill, then cross drill & tap it for a set screw. Set the drill bit in the bar, tighten the setscrew and away you go. Get this one made before you can find the page for the pin vise or small drill chuck in the catalog or on line!

David
Montezuma, IA

Boucher
08-28-2008, 10:44 PM
How do you hold the small drill in the lathe if you can't hold it in the drill press? Not trying to be a wise A__ . My head really is not working after having a small stroke and all sorts of problems from a staff infection. I ordered the pin vices and small chucks, they should arrive in a few days. A guy at the local Box store suggested the dremel tool. I think this might be the best work around. Any and all suggestions are really appreciated.

deltaenterprizes
08-28-2008, 11:28 PM
Great idea 38 cal,quick and easy!

Paul Alciatore
08-29-2008, 03:00 AM
There are several tools made for small drills. First, you can purchase small "Jacobs" chucks. Of course, you would have to adopt them for your drill press.

Then there are adapter chucks. They are small chucks with a round or hex stud for mounting them in a larger chuck. This is handy, but you will have the run out of both chucks and the spindle to deal with. With a small diameter drill, you can be off center quite a large percentage of the drill's diameter. Look for good quality in both the original and the adapter chuck.

One source: http://www.mcmaster.com/

Search for "drill chuck" or go to page 2372 and look near bottom. They list both an adapter chuck that goes down to 0.028" and a wire gauge chuck that goes down to 0.0083".

Then there are pin vises. They are manual devices and there are some different styles. Check out McMaster page 2514 at the bottom. A common style has a series of four collet style chucks that run from 1/8" down to just a few thousanths. They have a rotating cap on the back end so you can hold it with one finger and turn it between two others. I have drilled many small holes this way.

Another style pin vise that I have has a non rotating handle and several collet style chucks that mount in the larger collet style handle. Like the above, they range from about 1/8" down to just a few thousanths. These chucks look a lot like the Wire Gauge Chuck on the above McMaster page.

The problem with all of the above is drill breakage. The smaller the drill, the easier it will break and the slower it will drill at a given rotational speed. Most regular drill presses are intended for 1/16" and LARGER drills. Small drills should be run at higher speeds that are not available on these larger drill presses. You also need a sensitive touch on a drill press so you can actually feel the drilling operation and not just the drag in the quill feed. With the manually operated pin vise you can feel the operation but it is slow. I usually use my Unimat for small holes. It has faster speeds and a chuck that will grip drills at least down to #80. There are other similar machines and even some sensitive drill presses that are built for small drills. Check out the 7" drill press on McMaster page 2369.

Oh, and you can check out Dremel. They have a drill press and they make collets for their tools that go down to just a few thousanths like the pin vises.

huntinguy
09-02-2008, 10:43 AM
http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=290-1291&PMPXNO=951000&PARTPG=INLMK3

http://www.royalprod.com/product.cfm?catID=16

Personally never used one but, guys I know have and swear by them.

Hope your thinker get better. I know a few people that have gone through it too. Been told the more work you make the thinker do the better it gets... Hmm, maybe I should try that....:D

piniongear
09-05-2008, 08:45 PM
I need to drill some small holes 0.043" Can't find my tool that holds small drills that goes into the Drill press chuck. Need to order another one and can't remember what they are called. Spent most of the last eight months in the hospital and the old noggin don't work right. Help would be appreciated.
You most likely will be best off to use a pin vise for the .043 drill bit, mainly due to the low cost of the pin vise and not needing great precision.
If you do need real precision and do not mind spending the family's grocery money for this month, then by all means get yourself an Albrecht 0 to 1/8 inch chuck.
Pictured below is mine holding a #80 bit tightly. This fine little chuck closes down to an absolute 0.000 and opens to accept an 1/8 inch bit.

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a214/piniongear/Bridgeport%20Milling%20Machine%20Photos/2008-07-10.jpg

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a214/piniongear/Bridgeport%20Milling%20Machine%20Photos/TopviewofshaftendMedium.jpg

Here is a pic of the top of the chuck stem. Notice the inner shaft? This is connected to the outer shaft that resides in your inch collet.

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a214/piniongear/Bridgeport%20Milling%20Machine%20Photos/TopviewofwheelMedium.jpg

Notice the key way in the inner spindle. The key sitting in the slot ties the inner and outer shafts together.
The black knurled wheel has bearings installed it and does not spin when the drill is rotating. To advance the bit into the work just grab the wheel with two fingers and advance the bit into the work by pulling down.
This is why you can easily drill without breaking these tiny bits. The advancement is inch deep.

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a214/piniongear/Bridgeport%20Milling%20Machine%20Photos/2008-07-10_2.jpg
This is a closeup of the chuck jaws closed down on that tiny #80 bit...........pg

J Tiers
09-06-2008, 09:59 AM
Is that a "cold shut" or just a scratch on the end of the shaft in that fine high dollar made in USA item?

piniongear
09-06-2008, 10:47 AM
Is that a "cold shut" or just a scratch on the end of the shaft in that fine high dollar made in USA item?

It is nothing more than a very small scratch, It is so prominent because the pic was taken with a Micro lens. The actual OD of the shank is inch.............pg

Boucher
09-09-2008, 10:09 PM
Thank all of you for the input and suggestions. For the get it done today for the prototype the Dremel tool sufficed. When I got back home today the new pin vice etc had arrived. That Albrecht chuck looks good enough that it is probably going to assume a position near the top of my want list. Now I am wondering how long it will be before my original pen chuck set shows back up. Its dissapearance while frutrating inspired a moderate amount of shop clean up.

Powerpooche
09-16-2008, 10:52 PM
I needed to drill a .024 hole and found a small chuck that threaded in a die grinder. Drilled several holes with it. The smaller the bit the more RPM's you need! Just a cheap chuck,but it had a 3/8"-20 thread that fit the die grinder.


The amount of junk collected is proportional to the amount of space available!

A gun in hand is better than a cop on the phone!

P.O.

juergenwt
09-18-2008, 03:44 PM
Miniature drills with a bigger dia shank are available from many companies. Google it.