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toolgeezer
10-13-2008, 12:43 AM
I am wanting to machine a #2 Morse taper into a shaft using my rotary table and drill press. My thought was to drill a series of holes to rough it out and then finish up with a reamer.
Any thoughts and or experience with this sort of thing?
Thanks in advance, toolgeezer

J Tiers
10-13-2008, 12:53 AM
I am wanting to machine a #2 Morse taper into a shaft using my rotary table and drill press. My thought was to drill a series of holes to rough it out and then finish up with a reamer.
Any thoughts and or experience with this sort of thing?
Thanks in advance, toolgeezer

It's a lathe job. or lathe and grinder job

If you manage it with the DP and whatever, it will be by turning them into a makeshift lathe.

Fasttrack
10-13-2008, 01:09 AM
Not sure I follow you - how would you turn something into a shaft with a reamer? Do you mean you have a morse taper socket that you want machined into a cylinderical hole? It may be hard stuff but besides that, trying to drill straight down a taper isn't going to work. Morse taper is very slight so the drill bit will just glance off the edge and not bite. You would need to do it with a single point tool. Like JT says, it will be a lathe operation.

toolgeezer
10-13-2008, 01:18 AM
I am, as usual, failing to communicate.
I want to put a morse taper socket in a piece of rod using the drill press to make a series of gradually increasing size holes per the spec and finishing them up with the reamer.
I wish I had a lathe, but I do have the other items.
Pardon the miscommunication, please.

Ian B
10-13-2008, 01:44 AM
Toolgeezer,

If the DP and rotary table's all you have to work with, then yes, the method of step drilling and then reaming with a 2MT taper reamer should work. I'd suggest you use a depth stop for each drill size to prevent a drill going too deep.

The main problem is going to be ensuring that the resulting taper socket is concentric and aligned with the shaft. Many variables here; what is the end product, how much accuracy do you need?

Ian

toolgeezer
10-13-2008, 02:29 AM
I want to be able to do some milling. I want to make a quill for some other junk, so that I can mill w/o ruining my good Albrecht chuck. I would be glad to outline the project if you are interested.
Thanks for the advice.
BTW, I am seeing prices start to plummet on used items on ebay. Does anybody else see this?

macona
10-13-2008, 02:30 AM
You might be able to get a tapered socket into a shaft like that but I can guarantee you it will be neither concentric nor parallel to the length of the shaft.

You can buy MT2 extensions. Just cut off the tang on the end.

http://cgi.ebay.com/Morse-Taper-Extension-Socket-MT2-Hole-MT2-Shank_W0QQitemZ360002847910QQihZ023QQcategoryZ1096 81QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQcmdZViewItemQQ_trksidZp 1638Q2em118Q2el1247

macona
10-13-2008, 02:32 AM
I want to be able to do some milling. I want to make a quill for some other junk, so that I can mill w/o ruining my good Albrecht chuck. I would be glad to outline the project if you are interested.
Thanks for the advice.
BTW, I am seeing prices start to plummet on used items on ebay. Does anybody else see this?


What??? You dont mill with any chuck.

NickH
10-13-2008, 04:11 AM
And you don't mill anything in a drill press that can't easily be cut with a tool held in a chuck, (I did cut some 3mm slots in plastic on a drill press) the bearings are not designed for side loads or tension, just compression,
Nick

macona
10-13-2008, 04:37 AM
And nothing to hold the chuck to the taper but friction. Asking for stitches.

toolgeezer
10-13-2008, 08:52 AM
I agree, hence my desire to make a morse taper socket with a drawbar.
No need to plow this field again, K?

Norman Atkinson
10-13-2008, 09:26 AM
Before my second request to get the H*** out of here, I have to remind you that a drill press is the most dangerous of our workshop tools. It is from using it as a drill and not romping off to see what further modifications are possible. If the drill was big enough, it would have some form of holding device other than a drill chuck. In all probabilty, this would have a No 1 MT or 2 already. Therefore the question does not really arise. Deduction contues in that regardless of the bearings- and here people have given sound advice already, you haven't got the 'meat' for even a larger drill chuck.

Moving on, you have failed to grasp( now there is a remark) that a drill chuck is not for milling but for holding milling cutters etc.

I am confident that each and everyone here who has contributed will warn that the milling cutter in a drill chuck or a lathe chuck will move- and come out if the motor is not stopped.

In Naval terms, I would hoist two black balls one above the other. Your tooling might end up in a worse place.

Please go and buy a proper mill, small if needs be. Please go and read the subject up. No matter who is commenting here can write sufficient detail on safe operations in the drill or mill.

Now remove me-- I have been my brother's keeper!

J Tiers
10-13-2008, 11:26 PM
Let all who warn of the dangers of drill chucks remember their advice when discussing the similar friction-only holding device known as a "collet"....

What? A collet is so much different, you say? Whatever floats your watch.

Our model shop guy at the old place used an Albrecht chuck to hold end mills in the CNC bridgeport quite a bit..... I don't have a clue why he did that, and it worked perfectly for him. But he only worked with aluminum as a rule.

I would not do it, I agree that it asks for trouble with pull-out etc. But it has been done successfully.

Anyway, I'm having a lot of trouble understanding what is to be made here..... Is it a spindle to make that DP, or possibly some other one, into a mill?

What? The very idea! WHO would try to make their very own cheap mill-drill the same way those PROFESSIONALS in china do...... by modifying a drill press...?

I do agree that getting it even as centered as the chinese do might be hard with the equipment on hand..... but assuming that the DP in question has enough bearings in the quill, and there is a drawbar, it is in principle no worse than the cheap variety of chinese mill-drills.

I very much doubt that it will come out satisfactory with no lathe, doing it in a DP will probably "make a tapered hole", but it is very unlikely to be centered enough to be usable.

And other features are likely to be needed on the spindle also, a shoulder to take thrust, for instance. How that will be made is a question to me, unless the DP is rigged up as a crude lathe somehow.

So, bottom line: ultimate idea as I understand it is not absolutely unthinkable, but the equipment available is just plain NOT suitable to finish the job in a usable and fairly safe fashion.

Mike Burdick
10-13-2008, 11:48 PM
...
I want to put a morse taper socket in a piece of rod using the drill press to make a series of gradually increasing size holes per the spec and finishing them up with the reamer....

Hmmmm that's not a bad idea if the drill press is the only tool you got to do it with. Even if you go too deep with the drill you'll still have a "band" that will meet the taper if you use a reamer. I'd have to put a pencil to it but it may not require too many "steps" to achieve an acceptable amount of surface area for holding.

If you do it this way, would you mind telling us how it worked out?

Thanks...

JCHannum
10-14-2008, 08:39 AM
Not knowing exactly what is anticipated, I will not offer a negative comment, but suggest that you look into Morse Taper sleeves. There are several different styles available, usually well machined and on center. Several styles are available unhardened for maching for special applications.

You might possibly find one that is useable for less than the price of a MT reamer which you will need to buy unless you already have one.

Carld
10-14-2008, 10:19 AM
It seems you want to make a spindle to convert a drill press into a mill. You can do that but you need to have a machine shop make the spindle. The way you plan to do it will not work and it will not run true. I assume you intend to use MT endmill holders so everything has to run true.

Another issue is rigidity of the drill press and how to feed the work in the Y/X axis. In the end you will probably go buy a Horible Freight mill/drill. No matter what you do a drill press makes a very very poor mill. Way worse than the cheap mill/drills.

Just Bob Again
10-14-2008, 05:21 PM
Years ago, when there was no internet to tell me I was an idiot, I stuck a small X-Y table on a drill press, made a screw for the quill/Z-axis and had the world's worst milling machine. The problem with the chuck popping off isn't so bad. Obviously, I'm not dead. Even got all my fingers. It pops off when the cutter has a lot of side force. Generally the workpiece prevents the chuck from doing much else except clattering around. It isn't safe, but I've never heard of an actual serious injury.

More importantly, it's about worthless as a mill. I used a decent 150-pound tabletop drill press. An Atlas. Still have it and use it as a drill press. The quill and column and table are nowhere near stiff enough. With a .005 cut, it still looked like it was chewed out by hungry beavers. Compound that with a home-made quill and you're really wasting your time. If you want to do tiny stuff, like on a Sherline with a 1/8 endmill, the precision is not good enough. You'll be breaking cutters.

First thing, get a lathe. Then a milling attachment for the lathe. Then a real mill. Not gonna happen overnight. It's what most of us have struggled with for decades. Look on Craigslist. You can often get a useable lathe for a couple hundred bucks or trade something for it.

juergenwt
10-15-2008, 09:09 PM
Toolgeezer - You want to make a female #2 Morse taper.All you have is a drill press and a taper reamer. No lathe no ID-Grinder?
Save yourself a lot of time because you will end up with a piece of junk.
Try to buy a shaft with a finished M2 or see if you can find someone with a lathe who will put a straight hole into your shaft and buy a M2 taper sleeve.
My advise - forget it!