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GWS
10-22-2008, 12:12 PM
I have to do some welding on my truck and am concerned about blowing the electronics [diodes in the alternator, computer, etc.]. Would it be sufficient to disconnect the battery and insulate the cables so they couldn't touch the truck body? I'll be using a mig welder.

Thanks in advance for any advice.

Guy

doctor demo
10-25-2008, 01:12 PM
I have to do some welding on my truck and am concerned about blowing the electronics [diodes in the alternator, computer, etc.]. Would it be sufficient to disconnect the battery and insulate the cables so they couldn't touch the truck body? I'll be using a mig welder.

Thanks in advance for any advice.

Guy

Guy, I won't advise You but I will share with You that I have welded on My '04 Dodge truck with a mig without disconnecting any thing. I was adding a reciever type hitch on the front for a winch and had the ground lead on the frame near the welding. No problems at all.

I would suggest that you check Your owners manual, and possibly talk to the local truck dealer's service manager.

Steve

macona
10-25-2008, 05:01 PM
As long as you keep the ground clamp close to the weld area you shouldn't have any problems. It's when you do stuff like ground to the frame while welding on the exhaust us where you will have issues.

loose nut
10-26-2008, 10:41 AM
When we weld on the trucks and cranes at work we just disconnect the battery and ground near the area to be welded and we don't have any problem. The hoisting equipment has electronic displays and computers built in and we haven't fried one yet, can't say if the have any special protection built in.

datsun280zxt
10-26-2008, 10:48 AM
When I took an auto body repair class from the local tech school, they taught us to disconnect the batterys, and ground near where you were welding. If you happen to be welding right next to a computer, it may be worth disconnecting it from the harness as well, but I doubt you'd have any trouble. I've never fried anything yet and have done quite a bit of welding on vehicles over the years usig the above method.

GWS
10-27-2008, 11:11 AM
Thanks to all of you for your information and advice.
Guy

Errol
10-27-2008, 12:58 PM
MIG ok, but not TIG! Some years ago I fried an ignition module on a motorcycle when welding a bracket onto the frame. That cost me only a couple or $300 to buy a replacement, but I certainly learned to be cautious with TIG. Never had a problem with MIG, but I certainly take all the precautions that I can.

danlb
01-23-2011, 11:46 AM
It's anold thread, but I noticed that no one has mentioned that when you put the ground clamp "near" the area to be welded, that means electrically near. If you are not using the same piece of metal as a ground, then the exlectric current may flow through unxpected paths due to rubber washers, rust at mounting points, various bushings, etc.

As an example; Exhaust pipes are often suspended from rubber mounts. If you were to ground to a bumper's mounting bolt when welding an exhasut pipe a few inches away you may find the current has to travel the length of the car, through the engine and back down the exhaust system.

So when the choice is available, ground it to the metal part that you are welding.

Dan