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john hobdeclipe
10-23-2008, 08:13 AM
I just drove from Dallas, TX to Charlotte, NC. About half way through the first day, it occured to me that of all the big rigs I'm seeing, none were cab-over-engine style. So I started paying attention, and in the whole two day drive, I didn't see any COE rigs at all.

Why?

kurt w
10-23-2008, 08:42 AM
I'm not a pro trucker, but will chance a guess. I would think that the ride would be very rough with the seat over the axel plus the fact that to check the motor the whole cab must be raised.

John Stevenson
10-23-2008, 09:12 AM
No idea they are all cab over's here but we have smaller roads and tighter places to get into.
They are comfortable, in fact most are more comfortable than the average car.
Computers link seat suspension to driver weight and gross vehicle weight so empty trucks run as smooth as loaded.

Cab suspension is very good and noise insulation is fantastic.
All driver serviceable parts are checkable from the front flap. Mechanic serviceable parts are easily got to by tilting the cab right over on hydraulics.

.

Tim Clarke
10-23-2008, 09:28 AM
It's because the length laws have changed, and the shorter length of the COE isn't needed anymore. Other factors such as cost, acessability, aerodynamics contributed to the demise of the COE. Some smaler cabs are stil used for city tractors, and vocational trucks. We run the Peterbilt 320 in our fleet of garbage trucks.

TC

Swarf&Sparks
10-23-2008, 09:30 AM
We get a few cab-overs round town
these are more popular on the road

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b387/idgara_eng/roadtrainbulls01.jpg

SilveradoHauler
10-23-2008, 11:10 AM
They are still around, hay haulers here use them.

But, a limited market due to the easing up on overall lengths throughout the years.

Freightliner Argosy is the leader of the COE trucks today in the US.

Aerodynamics is not the best on a COE compared to a slippery low long nose conventional.

Fasttrack
10-23-2008, 11:18 AM
I know quite a few professional truck drivers and they call cab-overs "suicide" trucks. They don't like the idea of riding up front without a firewall or engine to absorb an impact.

Apart from that, the big issue was the relaxation of the length laws and the personal prefrence of drivers. The old COE trucks were noisier, hotter and provided a rough ride. Furthermore, there was not as much leg room and serviceability was more difficult according to some mechanics. Of course, other mechanics say they were easier so who knows...

Anyway they still do make new COE but in the US they seem to be medium to light duty haulers. The apparently have been redesigned to be quiet, comfortable, etc.

The old ones may have been more comfortable than a car, but thats not saying much. A "classic" semi-truck is extraordinarily comfortable. You can stretch your legs out, walk around, etc.

Willy
10-23-2008, 11:21 AM
Cabover trucks were first introduced to take advantage of overall truck & trailer combination length laws, which used to be very restrictive in some states and provinces. With the demise of these restrictive laws the advantages of cabovers became less important for class eight highway trucks. Although they are still widely used in city delivery and refuse trucks because of good visibility in tight places. In highway applications though they lost favor to conventional trucks due to issues of fuel efficiency and driver preference.

In the last ten to fifteen years there has been an increasing shortage of qualified drivers for long haul driving applications and companies soon learned if you want to keep good drivers you have to provide them with the equipment that they prefer. Pushing the aerodynamic equivalent of a brick down the road didn’t help the bottom line of truck owners either in their quest for financial survival in a world of higher fuel prices and shrinking profit margins.

Personally I used to put on about 3500-5500 miles a week, and have driven a few cabovers, and other than the fact that I did like their close quarters visibility, I didn’t really care for them much. It wasn’t the ride, as with air ride cabs, comfort was never an issue. No the issues I had were that climbing up and down to get into or out of the cab all day got to be really tiresome. But the big thing that always bothered me, especially when one considers the miles involved was that if you are ever unfortunate enough to be in an accident, don’t forget....you will be the first one there!

RancherBill
10-23-2008, 01:04 PM
But they sure are cool looking trucks

http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm100/rancherbill/coe1.jpg
http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm100/rancherbill/coe2.jpg
http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm100/rancherbill/coe3.jpg
http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm100/rancherbill/coe5.jpg

John Stevenson
10-23-2008, 01:52 PM
That is one ugly damn truck, anyone gottta pin ?

Can't comment on US trucks but we are now running at 44 metric tonnes gross although most trucks are made for 46 or 48 which is legal in some European countries.
That's equal to 48.5 US tons or 97,000 lbs

A 650 Hp Scania loaded at 44 Tonnes returns about 6 miles to the gallon.

.

Guido
10-23-2008, 03:10 PM
Rancherbill, I doubt if Mr. John will approve of this Autocar, but you will.

Pics were taken down the street, one saturday AM where a few of the locals gather for coffee and BS, never know what will show up.

www.pismoderelicts.com

Autocar, good ol' American iron. This car hauler won some prize stuff at the '06 HAN. HAN = Hot August Nights in Reno, Nevada

http://i126.photobucket.com/albums/p86/Guido_album/redcarhaulerfromrenoandpismoderelic.jpg

http://i126.photobucket.com/albums/p86/Guido_album/nutherredcarhaulerpicturefromRENONV.jpg

Wish this red dog could talk.

G

laddy
10-23-2008, 06:46 PM
Hey,
I still think the Cab Over Engine trucks are the best looking!!! I still kick myself for not buying one 30 years ago, I came close, but before buying the old girl realized it would not clear the garage door. Still should have bought it!!! Fred

andy_b
10-23-2008, 07:51 PM
http://i126.photobucket.com/albums/p86/Guido_album/nutherredcarhaulerpicturefromRENONV.jpg


G



NICE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

andy b.

hardtail
10-23-2008, 09:10 PM
But they sure are cool looking trucks

http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm100/rancherbill/coe1.jpg
http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm100/rancherbill/coe2.jpg
http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm100/rancherbill/coe3.jpg
http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm100/rancherbill/coe5.jpg

RancherBill just curious how you came by that photo, as it belongs to my buddys (2 brothers) that built and use it as their rod hauler, 5.9 cummins and can run 90mph easy all day, extensive mods. The one also has another coe in stock form (except for the 396) that has a potatoe hopper that he uses to haul coal.

jmm360
10-23-2008, 11:24 PM
I still see a few COEs daily, old pre-Reagan era smokers from gypsie outfits hauling containers from the port.

I drove local for quite a few years in AK mostly conventionals (KW!) and the few times I had to drive cabover I didn't like it, long climb up, but maybe long haulers like them. There is quite a bit of room in the cab. In a Mack you're elbow to elbow. Worse is an International S (semi-conventional) with 1/3d the engine in the cab with you, and the doghouse rubbing on your knee.

Rant over, but in US give an old cabover some room on the road, if it's still running it's low budget so expect poor brakes, maintenance, etc.

RancherBill
10-24-2008, 01:46 AM
RancherBill just curious how you came by that photo, as it belongs to my buddys (2 brothers) that built and use it as their rod hauler, 5.9 cummins and can run 90mph easy all day, extensive mods. The one also has another coe in stock form (except for the 396) that has a potatoe hopper that he uses to haul coal.

I was poking around on google images with COE, Chev COE, Cab over truck etc. I liked the pic. It is very cool.

http://images.google.ca/images?gbv=2&hl=en&safe=off&q=chev+coe&&sa=N&start=20&ndsp=20

oldtiffie
10-24-2008, 05:49 AM
I don't think that the position of the cabin would be too important here for aero-dynamics purposes. But I'd guess you wouldn't want to be short-sighted when checking your mirrors.

I doubt it would fit into most residential garages either:




World's longest road trains.

Northern Territory AB-Quad tanker road train. Trailer arrangement is B-double In towing two tri-axle dog-trailers1999 the town of Merredin, Western Australia made it into the Guinness Book of Records, when Marleys Transport made a successful attempt on the record for the world's longest road train. The record was created when 45 trailers, driven by Greg Marley, weighing 603 t (665 short tons) and measuring 610 m (2,000 ft) were pulled by a Kenworth truck for 8 km.

In 2003, the record was surpassed near Mungindi, New South Wales, by a road train consisting of 87 trailers and a single prime mover (measuring 1,235 m (4,052 ft) in length).

The next record was 1,442 m (4,731 ft), set by a driver in Kalgoorlie, Western Australia in a Kenworth owned by Doug Gould.

In 2006, a truck with 112 semi-trailers (at a length of 1,474.3 m (4,837 ft)) claimed a new record at Clifton, Queensland.

from:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Road_train

john hobdeclipe
10-25-2008, 07:56 AM
Thanks for all the answers. I had a feeling it was a matter of aerodynamics, never thought about the length restriction issues.

I'd love to have that Autocar parked in my garage!

madman
10-25-2008, 09:45 AM
My Trucker Friend tells me the CO models would be prefarrable in a super tight have to turn in a small area situation?

SilveradoHauler
10-25-2008, 11:48 AM
As I mentined in an earlier post, Freightliner still makes the Argosy, a very nice big class 8 COE. Might be the last big COE still manufactured in the US.

My hay hauler has a couple of old Freightliner COE's, his rigs are a 30 ft straight bed truck and a 40 foot trailer, around 90 feet overall when you throw in the trailer tongue. Think he has enough axles for a 120,000 gross.

He also runs a Western Star Conventional, sort of tricked out with chrome, nice looking truck.

Now if we need to talk "Class" in the big conventionals, nothing beats a pimped out 379 Extended Hood Pete.

RE poor maintenance on the old trucks, true, some guys run this way, but we have a pretty good inspection system at the WA state weigh stations, the junkers get a "park it" ticket and cannot leave the scales unless the gigs are repaired or they are hanging on a wrecker hook. Fines are pretty stiff. California is pretty tough also.

Timleech
10-25-2008, 12:30 PM
No idea they are all cab over's here but we have smaller roads and tighter places to get into.

.

The other reason is that they fit much better & no doubt cheaper on ro-ro ferries, as a modest sized island (with its own offshore islands) that's a serious consideration.

Tim