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torker
11-02-2008, 08:50 AM
Really??? I ummm...broke my damm welding glasses yesterday. Pulled off my resperator and the strap caught them...flinging them across the floor and the frame snpped in a weird place. About halfway around the frame. Very skinny there. I'm thinking I can't tig them cuz i can't see without them.
What do they use to fix these? It's Sunday and I need them to finish a job :(
Russ

Liger Zero
11-02-2008, 08:55 AM
I glued mine, wrapped the broken part with tape. When I was done I took them in for replacement. They took the lenses out and mounted them in a new frame for about $60

torker
11-02-2008, 09:14 AM
I don't have that option...they tell me these lenses are so old that they can't get frames for them. I think it's just a scam so they can sell me more glasses.
I have another pair that broke...three years old and they can't get frames for them. They're still broke also.
Glue huh? Being as how they are buggered anyway...maybe I'll just do that. Glue the frame to the lens... wrap her up with duct tape.. all the wimmin would want me :D

davidh
11-02-2008, 09:15 AM
broke the ear off where the screw is holding the frame around the lense. . . i used a bread twisty tie (really thin wire hiding under that colored paper) and they have been ok for at least 3 months. .

add iron where needed to stiffen the frame, add super glue.

good luck.

and working on sunday ? you must be one of those rich self employed guys :D

torker
11-02-2008, 09:26 AM
LOL! I wish I was rich...doing the "Job from Hell" ...mounting an old style Meyers snowplow on a newer truck. I'm way past makin any money on this one. It's turned into "Doing a favour for a friend" now.
But I can't see to finish the damm thing now. Four billion wires and plastic everything. Not a fun thing to try to weld on. Lotta fires. All the plastic coated chinese metal... :(

torker
11-02-2008, 09:28 AM
David...great minds think alike...or something like that. I was thinking of JB welding a piece of mig wire to the outside for extra support :D

Just Bob Again
11-02-2008, 09:35 AM
Little piece of tubing. Stuff the ends in and epoxy. Break the other side and do the same so they match.

Lots of frames these days are made from a titanium alloy. Maybe they can be spot welded. Not sure if anything else works. Frames these days stink. They only stock them as-is. Need a different length earpiece or wider nose, can't get them. Not modular like they used to be. Need parts for a frame only a year old, good luck. Want frames that are not wide and skinny because you have bifocals, nope. Except for aviator style.

I save my old frames now. Last couple prescriptions, I've re-used old frames. Have to wait for the round ones to come back into style.

J Tiers
11-02-2008, 10:14 AM
Yah, that titanium.... I think it's a scam.

If not, then why do my "titanium" frames cause exactly the same irritation to my skin that stainless does (nickel content) where the coating has worn off?

mark61
11-02-2008, 10:41 AM
I have silver soldered broken frames in the past. Tried electrical wire solder which worked for a while then went to good silver solder---the $80 per lb stuff held for long enough til I replaced them several years later.

mark61

torker
11-02-2008, 11:08 AM
But then I got thinkin... what kind of a tig weldor would I be not to try it..
I'll let you know...:D

Just Bob Again
11-02-2008, 11:37 AM
Yah, that titanium.... I think it's a scam.

If not, then why do my "titanium" frames cause exactly the same irritation to my skin that stainless does (nickel content) where the coating has worn off?

That's because it's a shape-memory alloy. Same family as Nitinol. Nickle/titanium. Lets you bend it while hot. Takes a set when cool and stays springy. I don't see much advantage with it, other than costing more. My old stainless frames held up just fine. I don't know what they recommend these days if you have a nickel allergy. I think all the metal frames have nickel.

torker
11-02-2008, 12:13 PM
LOL! Don't try to tig your glasses back together. I don't know what this stuff is ...but it goes "Poof"!!! And the heat makes some of the other joints fly apart. Anyone need some spare glass parts? Nuff said..

Paul Alciatore
11-02-2008, 12:46 PM
For most of my life, I believed that you really needed the exact prescriptions derived by the eye doctor with their magic routines with fancy machines and special drops. Now, my eyes are getting worse in terms of being able to focus on different distances and actually better at a distance (I am legally licensed to drive without glasses for the first time).

I made special requests of my eye doctor about vision at the distance that a computer screen is normally at. This is very similar to the distances of work in my shop. All to no avail. I got bi-focals that functioned just like the previous pair: OK up close for reading and not even as good as no glasses for driving.

I went to Wal-Mart and tried on the reading glasses in their pharmacy deptartment. I tried to find lenses that worked best at the distances I needed for computers and shop work. The reading glasses range from under $10 to about $20 so I now have several pairs. I keep selected pairs by my computer at home, at work, and in the shop. I just leave them where I use them. You can have a half dozen pairs for less than one visit to the eye doctor and optician.

By all means, do get the prescription lenses too, but don't feel you have to use them religiously. I have been doing this for over a year with no bad effects.

dockrat
11-02-2008, 01:08 PM
I went to Wal-Mart and tried on the reading glasses in their pharmacy deptartment. I tried to find lenses that worked best at the distances I needed for computers and shop work. The reading glasses range from under $10 to about $20 so I now have several pairs. I keep selected pairs by my computer at home, at work, and in the shop. I just leave them where I use them. You can have a half dozen pairs for less than one visit to the eye doctor and optician.

By all means, do get the prescription lenses too, but don't feel you have to use them religiously. I have been doing this for over a year with no bad effects.

Russ...I do the same as Paul. I need trifocals. Almost no magnification for distance but for computer and reading I need two different ones. That leaves me with a very narrow vertical field of vision so I now have local pharamcy single vision cheapies sitting at my computer and others in my shop. None of them over 15$. Just go in and try a bunch out at the distance you will be working at.

Willy
11-02-2008, 01:08 PM
Hey, Paul just gave me an idea...run down to some of the local stores that carry the "dollar store" glasses, and your done!

Edited to add: Damn, Ernie beat me to it by a second.

macona
11-02-2008, 02:26 PM
My dad did tig weld his frames. But he had to use a .020 tungsten.

mconlee
11-02-2008, 02:27 PM
when i go to the eye doctor, i measure what the focal length should be for my computer glasses, and my machining glasses. i order a pair of glasses with just that focal length, and then im happy. but you must tell and insist to the eye doctor that he make the glasses focus at that length away from your eye, or it never works.

Don Wojtaszek
11-02-2008, 02:59 PM
Eye glass frames are frequently made from a copper-nickel alloy called Cunistan. It is heat treatable and is very corrosion resistant. It is better that 316 stainless for salt water use.

I don't have a clue as to how to weld them though. See if a request to ASM international will get you some anseres. (ASM= American Society for Metals)

Paul Alciatore
11-02-2008, 03:12 PM
when i go to the eye doctor, i measure what the focal length should be for my computer glasses, and my machining glasses. i order a pair of glasses with just that focal length, and then im happy. but you must tell and insist to the eye doctor that he make the glasses focus at that length away from your eye, or it never works.

Yea, and they will cost $150. The insurance will pay $125 and you will be out at least $25 per pair plus the extra time for fitting, etc. I still like my way.

I will admit that if your two eyes are a lot different, this may not work for you. But mine, and I would bet most, aren't. Saves time and money.

doctor demo
11-02-2008, 05:45 PM
But then I got thinkin... what kind of a tig weldor would I be not to try it..
I'll let you know...:D
Hey Russ, You shoulda fixed the first broken pair befor you broke the second broken pair , that way you woulda had a repaired pair to repair this pair.:D :D .
Drill and tap the frame on each side of the break and bolt on a splice plate:eek: .

Steve

Your Old Dog
11-02-2008, 05:58 PM
If you're going to break your spectacles the best place to do is are the stems. They are easily repaired with shrink wrap tubing. The finish on my started to pit and scratch my temples so the shrink-wrap did the trick. :D

If I were really desperate for ladies Torker I'd take me a clear pair of plastic safety glasses and just glue my prescription lenses over top of the safety lens! Pure Butt Ugly but would be a secure fix. Or, how much JBWeld would it take to hold the lenses to a set of wire frames made from coat hanger?

torker
11-02-2008, 09:45 PM
LOL! I like the idea of the coathanger wire.. :D
I got a magnifying glass and had a good look at the carnage after the "poof" incident.
These frames look like some kind of brass or brass alloy. That would explain the "poof". Lotta brass welds like that to start...you need to establish a base then work from that. There's just no room for error here tho...the stuff is only paper thin.
I wish they were stainless...then I'd have had a chance.
I actaully had these glasses special made for welding only. They are bigger aviator style frames with good coverage around a shop enviroment. They also had excellent coverage inside a welding helmet when you are gouging and you got a face full of molten sparks under the helmet.
I have good eyesight in one eye and poor in the other.... my master eye unfortunatley.
These where almost the perfect focal length for welding...from 14" to 26" or so. Couldn't see any closer or further but very good for welding.
Russ

OKChipmaker
11-03-2008, 01:09 AM
I at 1 time worked as a jeweler, I brazed several frames together,this is a common job at most?some fullservice jewelery stores.I used a small as-ox torch.the size that is used for welding rings back after cutting to resize and for repointing mountings that hold stones in.
used silver solder for white metal and brass for copper colored ones.If useing brazing rod,have to beet it out real thin to get it to melt before the frames,used borrax in water for flux.OH dont forget to take the glass out of the frames before heating!(can use brass on white metal,but does not look as good as silver solder,but jewelers S.S could be hard to find,unless you know a jewer.)

dp
11-03-2008, 03:31 AM
Where I live there's a shop that repairs frames. Usually by replacing the parts with salvaged stuff. I broke an arm on my glasses and it cost $25.00 to get a replacement set that fit perfectly. I still have them for backup in case the new pair has a problem or become misplaced.

Your Old Dog
11-03-2008, 05:51 AM
They are bigger aviator style frames with good coverage around a shop environment. They also had excellent coverage inside a welding helmet when you are gouging and you got a face full of molten sparks under the helmet.


That's a useful line there Torker. I need new shop/computer glasses. I was going to get what I got now. The prime part set for the end of my finger tips with outstretched arms in front of me and the regular reading bifocal for reading on the bottom. These are narrow frames so I can look over the top of them for distance. They don't offer the eye protection I'm used to from regular glasses for routine shop use. Think I'll do the aviator style with clear on top, midrange set for end of fingers and then the bifocal for reading love letters !! I'm sure those will come cheap !!

Orrin
11-03-2008, 09:41 AM
YOD beat me to it; I was going to recommend heat-shrink tubing, too. I've used it several times to repair eye-glass frames. In fact, my prescription sun-glasses have a shrink-tubing repair that is a half-dozen years old and still holding.

Regards,

Orrin

Chester
11-04-2008, 10:37 AM
Torker

Another vote for silver solder. Wife broke the hinge off the main frame doing something similar to your bump. Used the yellow stuff and the white, water soluable flux, heating it carefully with one of those butane pencil torches, on low flame. Flattened out the solder and placed it under the hinge and then wired it all in place. A little heat did a perfect job, better than the original bond. Even the eye wear dispenser was impressed when shown my repair. Silver solder is tough stuff that can repair a lot of delicate items, that cannot handle a bunch of heat.

C.

torker
11-04-2008, 02:09 PM
LOL! I talked to the glass repair guy. He wasn't suprised that my frames went poof! when trying to tig them. He said he wouldn't even attempt to repair them where mine broke....too much chance of the coplicated little joints beside it coming unglued. Exactly what happened to me.
According to him these are some kind of brass alloy. Yup...silver solder with a very small torch woulda been the way to go.
On the bright side..they can regrind my lenses to fit new (way cheaper) frames. Should have them back today...YAY!

biometrics
11-05-2008, 02:43 PM
I have to agree with the "dollar store" suggestion. That is all I buy anymore... and I buy them $5.00 worth at a time. When they get scratched or broken they get filed in the round can and I open a new pair from the drawer. I go through about 10 pairs a year... sometimes the cheapest solution is the best one. :)

Walter Svandrlik
11-05-2008, 03:30 PM
I stumbled onto a pretty good solution for me. I had to replace my glasses The new prescription wasnt all that much different from the old one and one of the arms on the old pair broke off at the hinge so I can see quite well with the old pair. I wanted a pair of safety glasses that wrap around to prevent swarf/sparks and the like from making my life interesting but didnt want to spend the $$$ for a second set. I noticed that the old glasses would fit inside a pair of cheap plastic safety glasses. I broke off the second arm at the hinge like the first and was going to glue the pair inside the safety glasses. I pressed them inside and found that there was no need they fit snuggly and stay in place. If the safety glasses get scratched up it is really easy to swap for a new pair..

torker
11-05-2008, 08:02 PM
TaDAAAAHH! There IS another solution...threaten your optomorobber that you are going to go somewhere else.
As if by MAGIC....
All of a sudden they decided that a little grind here and there and lenses from both my pairs of glasses would indeed fit into other new frames.
Got both of them fitted etc for $140...new frames and all.
A lot bloody different than the $350 they wanted for ONE new pair cuz the old ones wouldn't work :D
Russ