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madman
11-09-2008, 09:17 PM
Well getting away from my other troublesome projects i turned to the 45-70 hand cannon. I had drilled and tapped 6- 48 thread for a rifle style front sight. NOW when i had installed the screws i removed one at a time and applied a drop of crazy glue to the threaded and degreased hole, this i repeated on screw number two. Now it sat a while but on the first shot the front sight took of like a tridon Missle and disapeared into the forest, HM I didnt have too many active effective threads maybe 2.5 turns but i was allready just poking the drill point into the barrel and didnt want to drill right through. I feel like a dink, Perhaps gunsmithings not my forte. Any ideas guys? I ordered a new front sight but i dont plan on drilling and tapping this one again LOL. Hose clamps >?? No just kidding?? thanx Mike

Ken_Shea
11-09-2008, 09:32 PM
Mike,
A hand full hey :D

Perhaps heat and vibrational shock may just immediately destroy crazy glue adhesion. Might try Lock-tite the permanent kind on any surface areas and the threads.

2.5 threads ain't much though, thats about .052 including the thread lead. Might also try grinding off as much of the thread lead as you can get by with.

EDIT:
Any threading left ?

No? - Then some of the lower temp Silver Solder is about all I could think of.

Ken

paul j smeltzer
11-09-2008, 09:41 PM
You might try silver soldering the front sight on. Of the many hand gun front sights that i silver soldered on none have come off. I used to make pin guns and PPC guns, as well as special length barrels on revolvers. Depending on the mass of the front sight, The recoil on the 45-70 will no doubt overcome the holding ability of any screws. Paul

dp
11-09-2008, 09:42 PM
I have a 45-70 rifle and it kicks like a son of a gun. I can't imagine shooting full loads in a pistol - but the pressure wave in the barrel has to be spectacular. Might want to braze that bad boy on there and same with the screws. Just for show, don'tcha know, so it doesn't look like a screwup :D.

huntinguy
11-09-2008, 10:30 PM
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=219874&t=11082005

If you shoot that one off... well...:p

dp
11-10-2008, 01:11 AM
Just found a site that sells 45-70 Derringer pistols. Krikey!

Dawai
11-10-2008, 01:19 AM
Considering most 45-70 loads are for a rifle...

consider this.. POWDER burns at a known rate, rifle powder burns at a much slower rate accelerating the bullet down the much longer barrel. Pistol powder burns at a much faster rate cause it has less time to accelerate the round before the gas is vented..

Shooting 44 rifle loads in my 44 magnum produce a flame about six feet long.. A 240 grain 44 pistol round really kicks a blister in your hand. But the flame is much shorter.

Do they make 45-70 pistol ammo? or is it all hand loads?

Watch your brass for over-pressure symptoms..
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D83tzCMeLPo A pistol.. watch the recoil.. Ok.. I'll stick with my 44 s-blackhawk..

38_Cal
11-10-2008, 01:25 AM
You probably used a standard #31 drill to drill for your sight screws. You'll want to go as deep as possible without bulging the bore...if possible, at least one thread diameter's depth. I take a spare drill bit and grind the end flat...no angle at all. I then releive it so that, in effect, it's a #31 end cutting mill. Drill the hole with the standard drill bit. Go back into the drilled hole with the flat end drill, and clean up the drill point angle. Tap the hole using a standard plug tap to start things, then a standard bottom tap. Take a worn out 6-48 tap and snap off the bottom 1/4" and re-grind it just like the drill bit. What you now have is a "dead bottom" tap and drill bit. Go back into the started hole with the "new" tap and cut threads clear to the bottom of the hole. When you fit your screw, cut it 1/2 thread short from the hole depth, to give some crush fit on the sight base. Use red Loctite. This will give you the maximum thread engagement and holding force for a very shallow screw. It's worked for me for over thirty years.

David
Montezuma, IA

dp
11-10-2008, 01:26 AM
Considering most 45-70 loads are for a rifle...

consider this.. POWDER burns at a known rate, rifle powder burns at a much slower rate accelerating the bullet down the much longer barrel. Pistol powder burns at a much faster rate cause it has less time to accelerate the round before the gas is vented..

Shooting 44 rifle loads in my 44 magnum produce a flame about six feet long.. A 240 grain 44 pistol round really kicks a blister in your hand. But the flame is much shorter.

My 45-70 rifle with 250gr bullets and 40gr of Red Dot will throw an 8' flame front. Spectacular thing to see at night.

andy_b
11-10-2008, 07:23 PM
My 45-70 rifle with 250gr bullets and 40gr of Red Dot will throw an 8' flame front. Spectacular thing to see at night.

SACRILEGE!!!! black powder is the only real propellant for the 45-70. :)
i'm currently experimenting with the Lyman 535 gr Postell bullets. thank goodness my Sharps repro has about 1/2" of freebore, otherwise the rounds would be too long to fit.

andy b.

dp
11-10-2008, 07:34 PM
SACRILEGE!!!! black powder is the only real propellant for the 45-70. :)
i'm currently experimenting with the Lyman 535 gr Postell bullets. thank goodness my Sharps repro has about 1/2" of freebore, otherwise the rounds would be too long to fit.

andy b.

I have a couple of old CVA bp pistols (colonial era). I'd thought about loading up some 45-70 round with bp but have never seen the loading charts for it. Obviously it originally had 70 gr of bp but with the new stuff that may be a bit over the top.

madman
11-10-2008, 09:43 PM
Im gonna try to silver braze it on or just put a red dot or scope on it. Its my field carry Moose Pistol.

andy_b
11-11-2008, 10:16 PM
I have a couple of old CVA bp pistols (colonial era). I'd thought about loading up some 45-70 round with bp but have never seen the loading charts for it. Obviously it originally had 70 gr of bp but with the new stuff that may be a bit over the top.

that's the great thing about BP, the cases were designed to be filled with BP so there was no airspace between the bullet and powder. that holds true for "modern" BP as well as the old stuff. i'm just talking about black powder here, not any of the modern substitutes like Pyrodex or 777. grab a can of FFg Goex, fill the case so the bullet compresses the powder about 1/8" when you seat the bullet, and there's your 45-70 starting load. the original military loads were a 405 gr bullet over 70 gr of black powder, so you'll never even come close to overloading the firearm using bullets in the 200-250 gr range with BP.

PM me if you want some more details of holy black 45-70 loads.

andy b.