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rockrat
11-09-2008, 10:49 PM
Ok, not directly machining but shop stuff none the less.

My favorite? Being able to find a hammer when I need it.

I have been moving the shop around, trying to get settled. In the old shop, hammers were either in the way or lost. Nothing in between. So I put this together quick to get things clutter free. In the old place, I had bare 2x4 walls. I could put one of these on each side of the 2x4 and make a little place to toss hammers.

Click for larger photo.

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/idea/th_IMG_7282-1.jpg (http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/idea/IMG_7282-1.jpg)



With sheeting on the walls, I had to put holes in a different location. On of the holders is screwed directly into the stud, the other is just through the osb. Works good.


http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/idea/th_IMG_7283-1.jpg (http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/idea/IMG_7283-1.jpg)

For the bare 2x4 mounting method, I offset the screw holes so that the fasteners would not interfere with each other.

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/idea/th_IMG_7284-1.jpg (http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/idea/IMG_7284-1.jpg)

rock~

rockrat
11-09-2008, 11:02 PM
Ok, I had a good day, all sorts of stuff got done. So here is another.

I like the idea of being able to move things around the shop. These trash cans have become expensive although they can be found on sale for a decent price. But they are heavy and if the rollers are purchased with the can, toss on the lid and you have a rolling workplace. I have done all sorts of things on this can. But since it is plastic, you may not want to weld on it.

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/idea/th_IMG_7265-1.jpg (http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/idea/IMG_7265-1.jpg)

The only issue that I had was the lid had no place to go when the shop needed cleaning. Roll the can to the sweeping site and toss the lid on the floor? That sucks. Why cant I just hang it somewhere?

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/idea/th_IMG_7267-1.jpg (http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/idea/IMG_7267-1.jpg)

Well, we cant have that. With a pair of clippers, I trimmed the lid's handle and created a notch so that I can hang the lid on the can's handle.

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/idea/th_IMG_7266-1.jpg (http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/idea/IMG_7266-1.jpg)

rock~

sidegrinder
11-09-2008, 11:24 PM
I've got two hoses hooked up to my ancient 6gal shop vac that give it a reach of probably 16 feet or so. It is located about midway into the shop, so the hose can reach both drill presses, lathe, mill, bandsaw, grinders, sanders and most of the floor--yeah, it's packed pretty tight. Anyway, this has always worked out really well. A couple of months ago, I picked up one of those remote controlled outlets. It is rated for 10amps and has a good 30+ feet of range. Now I just take the hose to wherever I'm making chips and when I need some suckage, I hit the remote. It's unbelievably handy and it also cuts down on the noise coming from the shop, as I only have to run it for a minute or so at a time. Helps to keep SWMBO happy too;) Well worth the $10 investment if you ask me.

Evan
11-10-2008, 12:35 AM
I have several devices around the shop that shouldn't be left running or powered when not attended. The soldering iron is one and the power supply for the motor drives on my lathe is another. I run them from a power bar and switch the power bar off to ensure they are powered down.

To remind myself to do that also plugged into the power bar is a clip on reading lamp with a 40 watt red light bulb that is on when the power is on. That way when I switch off the lights it is really obvious if I left the drives or iron powered up.

darryl
11-10-2008, 01:10 AM
handy shop tip- well maybe not a tip, but pretty handy anyway- I have two drill presses mounted on the same platform. Crank both tables to the same height, lay a board across and Woila! - a really wide table to handle long stuff.

'nuther tip- last week I bought a notebook that's held together with the full length spring thing. I then mounted a stiff wire to the wall behind the lathe. The wire is horizontal and one end is free. I do my drawings for things that I repeat from time to time on the pad, then open it to whatever page I need to refer to, then slip it over the wire. It hangs there nicely, and when done I slip it off, close it up, then put it back. No more curled or lost pages, hidden parts of drawings, etc. Because it's not laying around I'm not tempted to use it as a scratch pad, and I managed to select a pad with thicker than normal paper so it's more durable.

The paper is lined on one side and clean on the other. I can make a drawing on the clear side, then write any notes I need on the other side. OR- and this is what I'm going to do now- if I leave it hang and open it, the opened section will lean against the wall above the wire. I have the clear page above for the drawings, and a lined side below for notes.

Here's another handy thing- I bought one of those heavy plastic segmented trays, probably meant as a cutlery tray or maybe a candy and nut serving tray. I keep all the drill bits, screws, taps, etc, that are in use at the time in it. It's good to put small parts in as well when there's a little project going on. No more losing this stuff off the side of the bench.

JRouche
11-10-2008, 01:24 AM
Yeah!!! Great thread, I love to use all the tips I can get. And hey Evan, like that one. I have left soldering irons or hot glue guns on over night. Im looking at that tip.

I dont have any. Umm, super glue for cuts LOL Car windshield anti fog for all my glasses and face shields? Laundry matt for washing the shop towels so my wife doesnt kick my butt!! Spray bottles and gallon jugs of WD-40 instead of aerosol cans.

I dont have any but I sure love reading about others.. JR

dp
11-10-2008, 01:30 AM
Good tip, Evan - yesterday I was trickle charging some batteries from a UPS I have. Forgot all about them and when I looked next they were very swollen on every side - in excess of 1/2". I dropped a couple towels over them, pulled the power on the charger, and set them on the floor under a plastic bucket. Nearly had a hell of a fine problem.

derekm
11-10-2008, 04:10 AM
1)Teflon baking sheet plus a couple of magnets = instant way cover.
2) Closing/mashing last thread of T-nuts with a centre punch, to allow use of all thread bar.
3) 1" CRS bar + 3/4" UNF set screws = Engineers jacks.
4) dot of red paint by the grease nipples(zerks) that use grease and not oil and red tape round the end of the grease grease gun.
5) Second Evans about a light/s to indicate distribution being live and being able to switch it all off. (I use LEDS).
6) Aluminum baskets out of pressure cookers to hold parts in the parts washer...

mark61
11-10-2008, 07:10 AM
I use the bottom drawers from old refridgerators for storage. Even built shelves that they just fit into so I can't over load them on top. Cheap and the junk heap!

mark61

Your Old Dog
11-10-2008, 07:48 AM
Pork bellies.

1. Well not actually. I am using neodymium magnets more and more in my shop. I purchased 80 of them to hang wedding decorations from a metal pavilion for my daughters wedding. (they worked perfect)I toyed with the idea of selling them back on ebay but held off. These are 1/2' diameter by 3/8's inch long and have tremendous gripping power. I am thinking of making a mount to one of my digital calipers so I can use it wherever necessary on the lathe or mill and it shouldn't get damaged if over-extended. I use it to hold lights on my mill, wrenches on the side of the mill, refrigerator (toolbox) magnets. I am thinking on using them as magnetic catches on a primitive china cabinet in the dining room by drilling them into frame. I recently mounted a digital control box to the side of my ham radio using 3 of these magnets. It may as well be screwed to the case.

2. I also epoxied one of these magnets to the top of the drain plug on my mill just to see what chips it takes out of circulation from the fluid. Makes getting the plug started a real trip!

I found these are easier to handle if you bore a tight hole in aluminum and press the magnets into the aluminum. Be sure and cover them with a rag while pressing them in as they are very brittle and damn near explode when they fail.

3. I use the FRS radios as an intercom to the shop from the house. That way I don't have to look at a sour face while I'm eating dinner :D

4. I have a wireless light switch to a spotlight in the shop so the wife can get my attention when the radios are off. It uses a key fob and is kept near a window that she can see if I get the message.

5. I put up a 6" shelf all around my shop walls about 12" down from the ceiling. It makes it easy to spot spray cans, grease, oil and such with just a quick scan and it's completely out of the way effective storage.

6. I mounted the satellite dish for my shop HDTV entertainment center close enough to a bush that I can mow the lawn around it! The 125 watt sub-woofer just sits on a workbench for better whomp then I"d get on the concrete floor :D

7. I put a timer on my overhead shop propane furnace. While it never turns the furnace on, I do that manually, It turns it off everyday at 5PM, about the time I go in for dinner. If I want to go back out it's a simple matter to manually turn it back on with the timers override switch. This way, it is never on all night at about $3.00 a gallon.


I use the bottom drawers from old refridgerators for storage. Even built shelves that they just fit into so I can't over load them on top. Cheap and the junk heap!

mark61

I thought of doing something like that with deep cookie sheets such as the wife uses. Would give you mass storage for small parts. I do have a large sheep pizza thick aluminum tray I use for messy jobs like hydraulics and tearing down lawnmower engines. It keeps all the crap in one area.

BillH
11-10-2008, 09:16 AM
Don't part between centers and don't walk barefoot in the garage, especially in front of the grinder used to grind HSS

rockrat
11-10-2008, 09:23 AM
6. I mounted the satellite dish for my shop HDTV entertainment center close enough to a bush that I can mow the lawn around it! The 125 watt sub-woofer just sits on a workbench for better whomp then I"d get on the concrete floor :D


WHAT?!?!?!?!?!? HDTV in the shop? I have been accused of trying to get a bathroom and shower installed in my shop so that I never have to go into the house, but you sir, have vision. :cool:

rock~

jkilroy
11-10-2008, 10:42 AM
Be careful milling stainless, the chips are like needles!

Modern computers can use tremendous energy,(500 watts+) turn off when not in use.

Carbide is cheaper in the long run.

Make something for SWMBO at least two or three times a year.

Scishopguy
11-10-2008, 01:14 PM
You know the drill, "where did I lay the %#$@ chuck key for the drill press? Well, I found that the doughnut magnets from an old discarded microwave oven, which are usually broken in half when they fail, make a fantastic hanger for that chuck key. I put one on the side of each drill press and one on the overarm of the BP, and now I can find the keys without the danger posed by chains, cords, and cables attached to the machines.

Wrenches and allen keys are cheap and available at flea markets. I like to keep the tools needed to adjust attachments and tooling for the lathe and mill handy. I leave the box end wrench on the column of the BP that fits all the bolt heads on the machine. I keep the wrenches that fit the lathe in a can on the end of the chip pan nearest the tailstock. Saves a lot of time running to the tool box looking for the right wrenches.

I found that an old cafeteria tray will fit in the bed of the Clausing lathe and catch most of the chips and cutting oil drips. It makes cleanup a lot easier and I can just carry it over to the parts washer once I dump the swarf in the can.

I love to hear these gems of wisdom from others. Experience is a real good teacher. Keep up the good work guys!

lazlo
11-10-2008, 01:27 PM
WHAT?!?!?!?!?!? HDTV in the shop? I have been accused of trying to get a bathroom and shower installed in my shop so that I never have to go into the house, but you sir, have vision. :cool:

I've got HDTV playing on my shop PC with one of those cheap K-World USB tuners.

It's nice to have Monday night football playing on a high definition screen while you're cranking away on the mill :)

Fasttrack
11-10-2008, 01:30 PM
Be careful milling stainless, the chips are like needles!

Modern computers can use tremendous energy,(500 watts+) turn off when not in use.

Carbide is cheaper in the long run.

Make something for SWMBO at least two or three times a year.


Yeah stainless has been a new discovery for me, and along with learning about harmonics, I also learned about razor sharp swarf! :D

I don't think carbide is cheaper in the long run at all. Maybe for production settings that can take advantage of the high speeds and feeds combined with ease of changing out a cutting edge (time=money for those guys!)...

I mean, it costs me 2.50 for a 1/2" by 4" piece of HSS. Generally, I have to sharpend HSS twice for every time I need to swap out inserts. The cheapest inserts I've found are around $4-$5 and they provide three cutting edges. So, three cutting edges for 4 bucks or 20 cutting edges for 2.50. And you can even get more than that out of a 4" stick of HSS...

Endmills are probably a different story.

Evan
11-10-2008, 01:48 PM
Modern computers can use tremendous energy,(500 watts+) turn off when not in use.


That would only be the case if you had a multi core machine that was cranking hard on some problem continuously. I have measured the power consumed with a watt hour meter and for the average machine with an LCD monitor the consumption when idling is about 100 to 150 watts. The monitor alone only draws about 10 to 15 watts. Laptops are normally more efficient and will draw less than 100 watts in AC power mode, some of them much less.

dan s
11-10-2008, 02:35 PM
Some of mine:

1. You can never have enough light
2. Insert tooling is safer than HSS, unless your one of people that can grind chip breakers.

lazlo
11-10-2008, 02:48 PM
Modern computers can use tremendous energy,(500 watts+) turn off when not in use.That would only be the case if you had a multi core machine that was cranking hard on some problem continuously.

The older 65nm Quad-cores like the Q6600 have a 105W TDP. The newer 45nm quad-cores are 95W TDP. But in both cases, that's with all four cores running full out. At idle, they'll go into snooze or sleep mode, which requires way less power.

The biggest power consumption in a modern PC is the GPU (graphics card) -- the latest offerings from ATI and Nvidia consume around 250 W peak (i.e., when running a render intensive 3D application) -- about twice a high-end quad-core CPU.

In any event, most of the hardware in a modern PC will snooze when not being used. If you have an LCD monitor, set it to turn off the backlight (which is the majority of the LCD's power consumption) when not in use, and your PC will use a meager amount of power in stand-by mode.

Frank Ford
11-10-2008, 03:13 PM
My favorite shop tip? It's whatever one I just used, I suppose, and today it was gluing bin boxes. You know - those little shelf bin cardboard boxes. If you glue the flaps when you assemble the boxes they will hold heavier loads and last much longer without failing:

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/ShopTips/111.jpg

Here's a link to 406 more of my favorite shop tips:

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/ShopTips/tiplist.html

dp
11-10-2008, 03:14 PM
Frank Ford has some great ideas posted at his website. It would be pretty hard to not find something useful there.

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/

derekm
11-10-2008, 04:42 PM
...Wrenches and allen keys are cheap and available at flea markets. I like to keep the tools needed to adjust attachments and tooling for the lathe and mill handy. I leave the box end wrench on the column of the BP that fits all the bolt heads on the machine. I keep the wrenches that fit the lathe in a can on the end of the chip pan nearest the tailstock. Saves a lot of time running to the tool box looking for the right wrenches...


I've bought into this one of dedicated machine tool spanners but my garage toolsets are combination spanners and the dedicated machine spanners are deep set ring. That way I can tell which are which. I've gone for good quality ones but usually found at car boot sales (elora, matador). This is none trivial since its
BSW/BSF (lathe and DH)
AF (mill,shaper,DH)
and Metric (pillar drill,RT).
And now the shaper need a two sockets on a long extension...
does it never end :)

ptjw7uk
11-10-2008, 04:51 PM
I have some drill batteries that require 6 hour charge so in case I forget to turn em off I have used a one shot timer set to 6 hours.
I have looked for more one shot timers but that are in short supply.
The one I have is german and is electro mechanical and does secs mins hours so can go to 12 hours
Peter

BobWarfield
11-10-2008, 05:20 PM
- Use welder's "arrow magnets" to hold your chuck keys near where they'll be used. For example, the drill press, mill, and lathe tailstock.

- Use colored electrical tape to color code the wrenches and where they are to be used on your lathe:

http://www.cnccookbook.com/img/Workshop/Organization/P6293509.JPG

Suddenly I always have the right wrench at the right time after doing that. Yay!

- Kant-Twist clamps rock. They have a thousand and one uses. For example, as a carriage stop in this picture:

http://www.cnccookbook.com/img/SteamEngines/VerburgRevOpenCol/P1010485.JPG

- If you like Kant-Twist, track down one that fits in a T-slot. Awesomely handy:

http://www.cnccookbook.com/img/Tooling/TransferScrews/P1010882.JPG

- It's really easy to make your own transfer screws and they are so handy!

http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCTransferScrews.htm

- Make a rack for your air tools. Leave the air tool oil nearby.

http://www.cnccookbook.com/img/Workshop/P1010285.JPG

- Buy a box of steno pads and a box of Sharpie markers for the shop. Spread 'em around so there is always one handy.

Cheers,

BW

oldtiffie
11-10-2008, 06:05 PM
Good tip, Evan - yesterday I was trickle charging some batteries from a UPS I have. Forgot all about them and when I looked next they were very swollen on every side - in excess of 1/2". I dropped a couple towels over them, pulled the power on the charger, and set them on the floor under a plastic bucket. Nearly had a hell of a fine problem.

Sorry about replying late to this Dennis as I meant to earlier in the piece.

I think there is something I should know about in there somewhere about Uninterpretable Power Supplies (UPS's) for my computers.

I have been using APC UPS's (made - it says - in the USA)for years and a locally made one from OZ before that. All of them are on 24/7 and they charge the batteries as required. They "cut in" to either keep my computer going until power is restored or until I can shut the computers down, if power supplies get too low or cut off. They also act as a filter for "spikes" and "surges" etc. They - as inverters - use the (DC) battery supplies to generate the 230v 50Hz single phase supply required.

I have never had a battery failure other than "old age" or "worn out". I would not be without them. I couldn't imagine running a CNC machine without a UPS for the computer - particularly in the case of some who walk away and leave the CNC-ed machine to "carry on" unsupervised. Same applies to any computer in the shop because of potential "spikes" as machines/motors etc. are switched on and off.

I have to replace at least one of my three UPS's shortly and would appreciate any advice on the batteries or anything else about them.

Back to the OP.

Use UPS's on your computers and at least "surge and spike suppressors" for sensitive electronics - particularly in the shop.

They "work" for me.

oldtiffie
11-10-2008, 06:18 PM
Frank Ford and Bob Warfield,
you are not only a gold mines of info and help but very generous with the way you make it available.

It is surprising how often I browse those lists when I "hit the wall" or "want another opinion".

Thank you.

38_Cal
11-10-2008, 06:41 PM
Spray paint your wrenches, pry bars, brooms, hammers, etc., on the handles/shanks, with bright colors...red & white, blue & yellow, etc., to make them easier to spot in your son's car, neighbor's garage, wherever, when it's time to "borrow it back". No question then about who it belongs to...

David
Montezuma, IA

dp
11-10-2008, 06:48 PM
I have to replace at least one of my three UPS's shortly and would appreciate any advice on the batteries or anything else about them.

Back to the OP.

Use UPS's on your computers and at least "surge and spike suppressors" for sensitive electronics - particularly in the shop.

They "work" for me.

I have two telco racks full of servers in my "rec" room that serve as my backup storage and lab systems. I buy lots of batteries as that is what fails the most. I usually second hand APC UPS boxes from a local computer recycler. I pay maybe $5.00 for them and then replace the batteries. This unit I pulled the batteries from had been on line for 2 years working perfectly then suddenly a few days ago it failed with an open cell in one of the four batteries. I was testing them using my trickle charger to see if any were salvagable. The two that nearly exploded were fine until I screwed them up :). At the present time I have about 10kw capacity in UPS running, and another 5kw that needs batteries.

I just ordered two 12v 12ah batteries to replace the ones I buggered up - free shipping in the US, $75.00 for the pair. While I'm waiting for the new batteries I bought a second hand APC UPS on Craigslist for $80 and it was a drop in replacement. That one supports the tape backup units and network switches and routers.

oldtiffie
11-10-2008, 07:15 PM
WHAT?!?!?!?!?!? HDTV in the shop? I have been accused of trying to get a bathroom and shower installed in my shop so that I never have to go into the house, but you sir, have vision.


I've got HDTV playing on my shop PC with one of those cheap K-World USB tuners.

It's nice to have Monday night football playing on a high definition screen while you're cranking away on the mill :)

No radios, no TV, no talking in my shop - period.

I was brought up when the only - single - radio was on the mantle-piece in the Lounge - at home!!

When I was in "shops" in the "good old days" - what BS!! - there was no talking unless something needed to be said. And the machine or operation was stopped while that talking went on. In other words, if you had bugger all to say that was useful or relevant - don't!!

A shop then was a work-place - not an amusement park.

Its the same here. My wife never speaks to me when I am in the middle of something in the shop - she waits until I look up or until I stop or pause what-ever I am doing.

If I can't give the shop all my attention concentration, I either walk out until I can or not go into it.

When I was working in later years and I had to go to see people in various trades and shops, if a radio was going, I just raised my voice over the radio. It soon almost stopped the shop and either the radio was turned down/off or we left the shop to discuss what-ever the issue was.

My wife had a radio on most of the day - just for "noise/music" (and company???) - but the radio in my computer room is only turned on occasionally for the "News" and then turned straight off when finished.

I never go into my shop to do anything unless I am wearing "full-on" "Industrial" safety boots with re-inforced non/anti-skid soles and steel toe-caps. They've saved me some "grief" over time. I always wear jeans or overalls with nothing loose or flapping that can get "snagged".

Perhaps I'm old and old-fashioned but I've still got all my bits-'n'-pieces.

oldtiffie
11-10-2008, 07:18 PM
Thanks Dennis.

Good advice - appreciated.

dan s
11-10-2008, 07:31 PM
When I'm welding, I have a "knock and get permission before you enter" policy.



No radios, no TV, no talking in my shop - period.

lazlo
11-10-2008, 07:37 PM
No radios, no TV, no talking in my shop - period.

Try hand scraping for 8 hours straight. It'll drive you crazy without at least some background music.

I'm going to add a web cam to my shop computer so y'all can see what a disaster my shop looks like :)

Doc Nickel
11-10-2008, 07:58 PM
- Make a rack for your air tools. Leave the air tool oil nearby.


-An improvement on that is to use a structural rib extrusion instead of angle. This "encloses" the QD nipple end, and better protects the open end from dust and grit.

http://www.docsmachine.com/machineshop/airtoolrack.jpg

Doc.

oldtiffie
11-10-2008, 08:10 PM
No radios, no TV, no talking in my shop - period.


Try hand scraping for 8 hours straight. It'll drive you crazy without at least some background music.

I'm going to add a web cam to my shop computer so y'all can see what a disaster my shop looks like :)

Easy. If I am concentrating as I should be then nothing else matters and distractions are not needed.

In shops in those - thankfully - "far off good old days" it was like that every 8 hour working day.

It was known as "keeping your head down" - or in the vernacular - "head down and ar$e up - or else".

Oh, and "hand-scraping" was exactly that - no "power" or TC scrapers then. There was a time for it on your "Job Card" too.

It was hard enough just scratching or scraping a living!!

There were plenty of others in need of a (your??) job. That was our "bonus and incentive scheme".

And if anyone of us in our hobby shops wonders or blames any kids for giving workshops a "miss" in favour of "better things - I'm not one of them.

oldtiffie
11-10-2008, 08:13 PM
An oldie but still a goodie.

Use or make a "shadow-board" where every tools has its place (painted outline). It is very easy to do an audit and see if anything is missing and needs to be replaced or found.

DR
11-10-2008, 09:25 PM
Shop tips...............go to a large university engineering library. Look for the back issues of American Machinist magazine. The older issues had a couple pages of reader submitted "practical ideas". Lots of good stuff, all shop and machining related.

lazlo
11-10-2008, 10:12 PM
Easy. If I am concentrating as I should be then nothing else matters and distractions are not needed.

Geez, I have headphones on when I'm composing formal language definitions of coherency protocols.

For hand scraping, or feeding an endmill on a bazillion passes on the axis that doesn't have power feed (isn't that always the case? :) ), I'd go nutters if I didn't have something playing in the background.

lazlo
11-10-2008, 10:17 PM
Doc: I really like that style of air tool hanger better than the CarToys air rack that's on all the car shows:

http://static.summitracing.com/global/images/prod/Large/cfa-2001078.jpg

Is that extrusion you're using a standard structural aluminum shape, or was that a one-off?

wbleeker
11-10-2008, 10:35 PM
put a whiteboard up in the shop and dedicate a corner to tool loans, ie if you loan something to someone write down what it is and who to,preferably with the date, its a bugger when you can't find something and you think you lent it to someone, but can't remember who?
Will

38_Cal
11-10-2008, 11:18 PM
A friend came by recently with a garage sale find of a cigar box half full of flexible strip magnets...the type of material that signs are made on and "business cards" get printed on. I use them on the steel doors in my shop for notes, much as Will does with his whiteboard.

David
Montezuma, IA

oldtiffie
11-10-2008, 11:43 PM
Easy. If I am concentrating as I should be then nothing else matters and distractions are not needed.


Geez, I have headphones on when I'm composing formal language definitions of coherency protocols.

For hand scraping, or feeding an endmill on a bazillion passes on the axis that doesn't have power feed (isn't that always the case? :) ), I'd go nutters if I didn't have something playing in the background.

Thanks lazlo.

I must say that I was sorely tempted to comment on you "going nutter", but as "nutter" means the same in the vernacular here in OZ as it does in UK and probably NZ as well, I thought I'd best leave it to Wikipedia (what else!!).

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/nutter

Check the opening comment/definition as well as the topics under the heading of "Concepts commonly named Nutter" here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutter

I'm getting noises in my head too - so I will be off to see the "Shrink" (again??) before his "heavies" come and see me with that white coat with straps on - again!!!

See ya - when (if??) I get "out" again!!.

oldtiffie
11-11-2008, 01:36 AM
Get a good First-Aid kit, learn how to use it and keep it stocked with stuff still within its "Use-by date".

If you are alone in your shop or waiting for some-one else to assist, you may be glad you have it and used it!!

dan s
11-11-2008, 02:19 AM
If you don't have a tap guide, get one. It's one of the most useful "simple" tools in my arsenal.

http://img354.imageshack.us/img354/6600/tapguidemf2.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

Paul Alciatore
11-11-2008, 02:49 AM
I have purchased several of those inexpensive, import wrench sets (open end/box combos) you find at Wal-Mart and other discount locations. The individual wrenches are then removed from the sets and assigned permant duty at various places around the shop where they fit. Clamp sets, lathe adjustments, collet closer, etc. Very handy and my good wrenches stay in the full sets for general use. Before I started doing this I was always searching for wrenches.

Also, they can be reground for special purpose tools at very little cost. You will have little hesitation to grind up a $1 wrench. The 1/4" hex drive sockets and other 1/4" hex drive tools are good for this also. I always keep some extras around the shop for this.

DickDastardly40
11-11-2008, 04:05 AM
Get a good First-Aid kit, learn how to use it and keep it stocked with stuff still within its "Use-by date".

If you are alone in your shop or waiting for some-one else to assist, you may be glad you have it and used it!!

I keep a number of various sized sticking plasters out of the box with the wrapper already opened so that they are easier to find and self-apply on odd occasions of skinned knuckles or a 'burr rash'.

oldtiffie
11-11-2008, 04:32 AM
As you get older there is a pretty good chance that you will start to forget where things are or where they belong and seemingly forever "losing" stuff that you need NOW!!.

I pretty well have a place for everything with - mostly - everything in its place. I can just about always put my hand on what I want because I put it away in the same place. I have been caught too often with not putting things back where they belong, forgetting where I put them, bought a new replacement item for the one I couldn't find or remember where I'd left it and within minutes or days found the "lost" one.

So let's have a look.

Ever not been able to find those Fukung spanners? Well I might have them. Here they are - "made in China" which I bought in Hong Kong in late 1958 - 50 years ago. And I've had first class service from them ever since - including in my tool-box while at sea in the Navy. So, anyone who thinks that all "Chinese" stuff is new or "$h*t" had better thing again. I had quite a lot more of it - mostly very good (mainly) and some rubbish too.
http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Shop_and_tools/Shop_tools1.jpg


I just had to get my storage right so that I could put stuff away and away from corrosion/rust etc. and so that I could find it - like this. All them Fukung spanners and most other hand-tools for the bench and else-where. Those hard-wood strips are screwed to battens fixed to the shop wall girts. I just put nails in and bend them to suit the tools. It is all easily replaced. I can see what I've left off that has to be found before I close the shop.
http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Shop_and_tools/Shop_tools2.jpg


This is the "back" of the shop with its racking which is commercial grade and is adjustable and takes a lot of weight and is very accessible:
http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Shop_and_tools/Shop_tools3.jpg


This is my lathe bench. I have three of them (more later). It is fully braced and has four extra RHS legs welded in and to the bottom shelf. The bench top is 3mm steel plate as is the shelf/tray underneath. It had lots of weight on it and handles it easily. The drawers are on ball bearings. All of the lathe stuff is in the draws and on the shelf. There is some other gear there as well.
http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Shop_and_tools/Shop_tools4.jpg


These are my Tool & Cutter and Surface grinders on their bench. The drawers are full of mill stuff. All the precision grinder parts are in the separate steel cup-boards - with the precision measuring gear - at the far end of the bench.
http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Shop_and_tools/Shop_tools5.jpg


These are my universal grinder and my Sieg X3 mill on their new fully braced - and four new legs, as before - with mainly mill stuff in the drawers and the bottom shelf as yet empty waiting to be filled/populated. The universal grinder precision accessories are in the new cabinet at the end of the bench.
http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Shop_and_tools/Shop_tools6.jpg


This is a shot from my car-port/work-shop extension toward the shop.
http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Shop_and_tools/Shop_tools7.jpg

And I CAN find just about everything - mostly.

John Stevenson
11-11-2008, 04:39 AM
Get a good First-Aid kit, learn how to use it and keep it stocked with stuff still within its "Use-by date".

If you are alone in your shop or waiting for some-one else to assist, you may be glad you have it and used it!!

Don't forget the tin of Borax welding flux and masking tape, no joking it's saved me many times.
The borax dries the would up and the tape holds it together.

Ironically on my current tin it says keep out of cuts and seek medical attention.
So you get this into a cut, go to the ER and they wash the would, clean it and put borax powder on it :p

I have been a manual worker all my life, no office jobs and for 19 years worked on large trucks, not an easy job and had my share of injuries. The rest of the time has been on machines.
In all my working life I have had zero stitches, fingers opened up to the bone have been washed, powdered up and taped back.

.

Your Old Dog
11-11-2008, 07:42 AM
Spray paint your wrenches, pry bars, brooms, hammers, etc., on the handles/shanks, with bright colors...red & white, blue & yellow, etc., to make them easier to spot in your son's car, neighbor's garage, wherever, when it's time to "borrow it back". No question then about who it belongs to...

David
Montezuma, IA

In that same vane, if you want to keep something till it wears out just ugly it up a little. Crude job with spray can will make undesireable for stealing. Nice new shiney stuff usually walks first!!

Your Old Dog
11-11-2008, 07:48 AM
Try hand scraping for 8 hours straight. It'll drive you crazy without at least some background music.

LOL Ain't that the truth. The sign on my door says "Don't talk louder then the HDTV - wait for a commercial break"

My shop is like an extension of my living room, I go there to relax and play.

lazlo
11-11-2008, 08:59 AM
My shop is like an extension of my living room, I go there to relax and play.

Exactly!

That's why I've been resisting CNC in my shop -- I build computers all day, the last thing I need when I come home is to see another computer.

Good thing I'm not a gynecologist :)

biometrics
11-11-2008, 09:16 AM
To Keep Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) batteries "healthy"... you must exercise them because sealed lead acid batteries are just like you... they atrophy when not used.

The Army has a maintenance/safety policy for these devices. At least once a month, they must be tested.

This involves removing AC power from them and allowing the batteries to run down for at least 30 minutes (or whatever length of time they are rated for). Then when you plug them back up, they fully charge...

This exercise makes them last a lot longer than just sitting on the charge current for their lifetime...

smiller6912
11-11-2008, 09:28 AM
The "workmate" (and its HF clones) http://www.blackanddecker.com/ProductGuide/CategoryOverview.aspx?cPath=1496.1506 is just one of those things that makes my life a bit easier.
I have a few of these, one I keep cleaned of and drag around the shop for what it was designed, A work table, and others have things mounted to them and casters installed so that the tools are simple to get to when needed and put back in their parking spot when not. It is amazing how much working space I have when the lesser used tools (miter saw, buffer,blast cabinet, disk sander, bench grinder, etc) are not permanently occupying valuable real estate.

dp
11-11-2008, 12:29 PM
This exercise makes them last a lot longer than just sitting on the charge current for their lifetime...

Probably so, but then they'd have to be called Interruptible Power Supplies :). My largest supply does that automatically but has enough batteries it can stage segments of them to take off line and still keep enough on line if there's an outage. There's no way I can shut down the data center once a month to save a little on batteries. CPU time is money.

TheAndroid
11-11-2008, 01:14 PM
Have and maintain fire extinguishers appropriate for your current task nearby. You NEVER know if you'll need it.

I have a three bay metal building workshop in which I store a 1974 Eldorado convertible which I am working on. I move the car in and out as I need the bay in which it is kept. One day last June, I backed the car out and left it idling while I did some layout work for welding up a barbeque pit. Since I don't drive this car much, I often let it idle to charge the battery.

As I was working, I noticed the engine compartment smoking! It took me about a minute to find the electrical extinguisher. During that time, the car burned up the distributor, coil and a fair bit of the wiring on the engine. If I knew where the extinguisher was in the first place, I would have saved myself a bunch of trouble.

Having the extinguishers isn't enough. Know where they are and that they are charged and ready to go. I have electrical (dry) and foam (wet) ones because of the range of things I do in the shop. Clearly identify which is which.

Scishopguy
11-11-2008, 01:23 PM
I've bought into this one of dedicated machine tool spanners but my garage toolsets are combination spanners and the dedicated machine spanners are deep set ring. That way I can tell which are which. I've gone for good quality ones but usually found at car boot sales (elora, matador). This is none trivial since its
BSW/BSF (lathe and DH)
AF (mill,shaper,DH)
and Metric (pillar drill,RT).
And now the shaper need a two sockets on a long extension...
does it never end :)

I have run into this issue too and I am seriously looking through flea markets and junk shops to find the correct wrenches that came with my tools. So far I have come up with some of the square head box end wrenches that come with tool holders, a combination square box and open end that goes to a larger lathe than mine, and lots of other odds and ends. It is fun to find them cheap too!:D

smiller6912
11-11-2008, 01:36 PM
If you don't have a tap guide, get one. It's one of the most useful "simple" tools in my arsenal.

OMG......... do you love that thing or what? I don't know what I did without it. :cool:

danlb
11-11-2008, 01:42 PM
When using a small shop vac to pick up the scrap, swarf and other stringy stuff around my garage, the hose often clogs as a splinter or other long piece wedges into the corrogated hose.

I replaced the hose with a flexible 6 foot vinyl tube from Home Depot. I chose one with the same OD as the original hose. It was a dollar a foot. The thick walls of the tubing keep it from collapsing.

The smooth walls let me suck up all the swarf around my lathe or mill without worrying about the hose. Splinters and shaving from woodworking just pass right through. It has not clogged in the last year.

Dan

Scishopguy
11-11-2008, 02:02 PM
No radios, no TV, no talking in my shop - period.

I was brought up when the only - single - radio was on the mantle-piece in the Lounge - at home!!

When I was in "shops" in the "good old days" - what BS!! - there was no talking unless something needed to be said. And the machine or operation was stopped while that talking went on. In other words, if you had bugger all to say that was useful or relevant - don't!!

A shop then was a work-place - not an amusement park.

Its the same here. My wife never speaks to me when I am in the middle of something in the shop - she waits until I look up or until I stop or pause what-ever I am doing.

If I can't give the shop all my attention concentration, I either walk out until I can or not go into it.

When I was working in later years and I had to go to see people in various trades and shops, if a radio was going, I just raised my voice over the radio. It soon almost stopped the shop and either the radio was turned down/off or we left the shop to discuss what-ever the issue was.

My wife had a radio on most of the day - just for "noise/music" (and company???) - but the radio in my computer room is only turned on occasionally for the "News" and then turned straight off when finished.

I never go into my shop to do anything unless I am wearing "full-on" "Industrial" safety boots with re-inforced non/anti-skid soles and steel toe-caps. They've saved me some "grief" over time. I always wear jeans or overalls with nothing loose or flapping that can get "snagged".

Perhaps I'm old and old-fashioned but I've still got all my bits-'n'-pieces.

Oldtiffie...I understand and respect your stance on shop practice. Every shop is different, however, and a lot of things come about due to the type of work they do and how the workers function in their jobs. The tool and die shop that I worked in was very strict about safety gear and horseplay in the shop. There was no music there, but that was because it was a huge plant and it was not practical. The fabrication shop I worked in was a greatly different place. My small prototype area/machine shop was next to the tig welding booths. There were 5 welders working on large sheet metal cans all day long. Whenever they would weld on these cans the cans would warp and they would warp and had to be beaten back into shape with large rawhide mallets. THe machines I had to work with were "tired old nags" with lots of slop in the screws and were pretty scarry to work with. This was compounded by the welder pounding his can without any notice. It was here that I learned to block out outside sounds, even loud and unexpected ones. I did it by playing the radio nearby and using it as a noise dampener. It worked and now I can block out anything or anyone, even if they come up behind me. This was especially handy in the university shop, where people would walk in and demand attention instantly. I had a "frank and meaningful discussion" with many a faculty member about the safety and liability issues associated with interruptions of shop personnel. I still like soft background music while I work. It clears my mind of distractions and helps me focus on what I am doing. I've been in this business about 35 years, worked around power presses, large milling machines, sheet metal machines, and a whole bunch of dangerous stuff and I am proud to say that I still have all my bits, eyes, and hearing. I guess it all boils down to what helps you concentrate on what you are doing.

best regards,

dockrat
11-11-2008, 02:11 PM
Speaking of shopvacs....I made up a PVC fitting to reduce the 2 1/2 shopvac hose to 2" in-house vac pvc pipe and plumbed it in and hung the pipe from the ceiling joists all the way down my basement with 3 outlets. I bought a 25 foot in-house vac hose from home depot and now the shopvac just sits in its corner. No more dragging it all over the basement. I can reach all the rooms with it down there besides the shop area and also out into the driveway to do the vehicles.

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh67/Dockrat1/IMGP1132Medium.jpg

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh67/Dockrat1/IMGP1131Medium.jpg

Note: I hang the hose alongside the pipe...easy storage and out of the way

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh67/Dockrat1/IMGP1133Medium.jpg

bollie7
11-11-2008, 08:52 PM
6) Aluminum baskets out of pressure cookers to hold parts in the parts washer...
What! You don't use the dishwasher in the kitchen?

bollie7

bollie7
11-11-2008, 09:18 PM
I like to keep a 20 litre bucket of water in the shed. Good for cooling stuff, some fires (never had to use it for that though) and great if you burn yourself. The 2 Rotties love it as well. Must taste better than water from the dog bowl.

bollie7

oldtiffie
11-11-2008, 09:49 PM
6) Aluminum baskets out of pressure cookers to hold parts in the parts washer...


What! You don't use the dishwasher in the kitchen?

bollie7

That's the way - use what you've got for what its for.

Use the 4-legged helper in the kennel to pre-clean the plates and the 2-legged one in the Kitchen to scour and scrub them before doing them in the sink. Use the auto dish-washing machine for "shop stuff". 2-legged helper won't mind a bit - she'll be only to honoured and pleased to help - and then she can wash the dishes and put them away.

Gotta show the hired help who is in charge and to keep them showing due deference and knowing their place and staying in it.

Now when you stop whining and pick yourself up .............

oldtiffie
11-11-2008, 09:50 PM
Keep a good portable fan for removing welding fumes.

Evan
11-12-2008, 02:19 AM
To change a bandsaw blade really requires three hands. #$*^^@

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics5/bandsaw3.jpg

It makes it so much easier...

dan s
11-12-2008, 02:39 AM
And a good thick set of gloves.


To change a bandsaw blade really requires three hands.

danlb
11-12-2008, 03:23 AM
And a good thick set of gloves.

Very good advice. A bandsaw blade that is collapsed into 10 inch coils can NOT be uncoiled without being bit by the teeth. And trying to toss it away does not really work either. I tried.

And now for a shop trick.

I keep my lathe accessories in plastic containers. I made the containers double hinged by cutting them in half ( so there is a front and back half) and rejoining them with thick packaging tape. Now I can slid one 1/2 way out of it's slot, raise the front of the lid to grab a tool and slide it back in. The lids keep the swarf out.

There is a picture of the containers here:

http://home.earthlink.net/~dbsweb/shelves1.jpg
http://home.earthlink.net/~dbsweb/shelves2.jpg

Dan

dockrat
11-12-2008, 11:35 AM
Those cheap plastic trays that KBC sells make good dividers for endmill storage and they just fit into a sidebox drawer.

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh67/Dockrat1/IMGP1134Medium.jpg

jkilroy
11-12-2008, 12:31 PM
By "modern computers" I mean, as Evan pointed out, monster desk tops. Mine, a quad core gorilla draws right at 200w without anything in it (hard drive, graphics card, etc) in it and no operating system running. Thats the mother board and power supply. I am sure a lot of that is the multitude of fans, three in the power supply alone, three in the case. Supposedly the processor draws 120w by itself, at full bore, then you have to add hard drives, and the graphics card, and whatever else you have.

On the carbide being cheaper, I did mean end mills. However, if there is any value being placed on time, inserts, even at full retail, are cheaper than HSS. The time wasted on grinding and setting center height will pay for the inserts.

derekm
11-12-2008, 12:57 PM
What! You don't use the dishwasher in the kitchen?

bollie7

If its really bad and worth the wait for it to cycle yes. She doesnt have a problem with oily mucky, but she doesnt like swarf in her sink or dishwasher.

Racing car parts were never a problem, e.g. oil radiators, bell housings, gearbox sumps, valves, cylinder heads ... all got the green light for the dishwasher... After all she was the mechanic on race days!

When I got this one she came with a car, a set of tools, a bolt extractor set, a head gasket kit, a can of oil and the knowledge on how to use all of them. Oh and she could cook. So putting some oily bits of metal in the dishwasher ~ No problem :)

lazlo
11-12-2008, 01:13 PM
Mine, a quad core gorilla draws right at 200w without anything in it (hard drive, graphics card, etc) in it and no operating system running.

Supposedly the processor draws 120w by itself, at full bore, then you have to add hard drives, and the graphics card, and whatever else you have.


From the 2nd page:


The older 65nm Quad-cores like the Q6600 have a 105W TDP. The newer 45nm quad-cores are 95W TDP. But in both cases, that's with all four cores running full out. At idle, they'll go into snooze or sleep mode, which requires way less power.

The biggest power consumption in a modern PC is the GPU (graphics card) -- the latest offerings from ATI and Nvidia consume around 250 W peak (i.e., when running a render intensive 3D application) -- about twice a high-end quad-core CPU.

In any event, most of the hardware in a modern PC will snooze when not being used. If you have an LCD monitor, set it to turn off the backlight (which is the majority of the LCD's power consumption) when not in use, and your PC will use a meager amount of power in stand-by mode.

dp
11-12-2008, 03:30 PM
From the 2nd page:

The snooze mode is triggered in software is it not? If so then with no OS installed the MB runs in wakeup mode all the time, I would guess. I don't work around Intel procs much so am relying on incidental reading on the subject.

oldtiffie
11-12-2008, 05:29 PM
................................
................................

When I got this one she came with a car, a set of tools, a bolt extractor set, a head gasket kit, a can of oil and the knowledge on how to use all of them. Oh and she could cook. So putting some oily bits of metal in the dishwasher ~ No problem :)

Same here Derek.

Can't beat a good w(r?)ench in the servicing department.

Any problem - straight onto the bench and get stuck into it.

If if gets too retarded and won't start - a good kick in the slats helps no end. Too advanced? Cut it off at the knees. When its running sweetly - you've got it right.

Replacement? Even better - see Hugh Hefner for another - new or used ("Pre-loved"??) - your choice.

Oh - I see you have already placed your order. Here is our Service Manager (motto: "Service with a smile") air-freighting a selection of road-tested (for optimum performance) Pit ("Bull") crew (Lipstick - optional) for your choice.
http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Funnies/Virgin1.jpg

Our "buy one - get one free" option - no payments for 36 months - has been approved.

Our "money back if not fully satisfied" guarantee applies.

We have tested these in our approved Testing Laboratory (ISO 6000/9000 - endorsed and regularly audited) - full pink granite surface plates have been used. Our world-class superior Metrology scientists have used their unique "slip-guage test" - with successful "wringing" achieved.

Comes with a free/bonus pen and score sheet for your exclusive use.

Any useful and relevant work-shop tips will be appreciated and acknowledged and incorporated into our comprehensive User/Operating/Service manual.

This offer does not apply to the US or NAFTA zone (waste of time and effort) but DOES apply to those in Canada and Alaska at concession rates for the winter ("Snow Bunny") season - optimised for "cold starts".

Virgil Johnson
12-20-2008, 09:26 PM
I had been thinking about this for a while and accomplished it last week. First I measured all of my parallels I use on the mill and recorded the actual size under each one on the holder on the wall where they hang. Next I measured the height of the jaws on my Kurt vise. I subtracted the size of each parallel from the jaw height and wrote this number under each corresponding parallel. This is the minimum stock thickness that can be milled without hitting the vise jaw. I figured in .005 safety for each size. If you need a min of .567 protruding from the vise then its a simple look at the chart to see which size will work best.