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R W
12-18-2008, 06:15 AM
Has anyone built there own Cole Drill.

torker
12-18-2008, 07:42 AM
No...but Evan will now :D

jdunmyer
12-18-2008, 01:16 PM
RW,
Cole drills come up on eBay pretty regularly, in fact there's one there now:

http://cgi.ebay.com/Cole-Tool-Mfg-No-7-Portable-Drill-Press_W0QQitemZ190274892042QQcmdZViewItemQQptZBI_T ool_Work_Holding?hash=item190274892042&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_trkparms=72%3A1205%7C66%3A2%7C65%3A12%7C39%3A1%7C 240%3A1318%7C301%3A1%7C293%3A1%7C294%3A50

dp
12-18-2008, 01:20 PM
I'll end up with one but as a result of building a universal tool post from cannibalized benchtop drill press parts.

Liger Zero
12-18-2008, 01:45 PM
Hunh. Another tool I had no idea I needed.

Fasttrack
12-18-2008, 02:49 PM
LOL I was going to post the exact same thread the other night but decided I didn't want to open that can of worms yet. Instead, I decided to ask about rotary broaches! :D

The cole drill is another useful and seemingly simple tool that I'd like to get my hands on. Seems like it would be easy enough to build one.

hornluv
12-18-2008, 04:07 PM
The cole drill is another useful and seemingly simple tool that I'd like to get my hands on. Seems like it would be easy enough to build one.

I've been thinking that for a long time, but haven't gotten around to it. Does anyone have one that would be willing to fill us in on the thread pitch used to advance the drill. I was thinking 20 TPI would probably be about right. That would advance the drill .050" per revolution, but it wouldn't be so fine that it would strip out easily.

jdunmyer
12-18-2008, 04:48 PM
I bought a Cole drill at a flea market, thinking it's something that might come in handy "one day", but I've never used it in the 8 or 10 years I've had it. Still not ready to part with it, because "it might come in handy one day". :-)

Checked the thread pitch, and it appears to be 10 TPI. A quicky check with a caliper says that the diameter is 1.236".

Mine has a 1/2" chuck on it.

R W
12-23-2008, 05:11 AM
See the Cole Drill on Ebay went for $104, looked to be a good one.
If shipping and the exchange rate wern't so high I would have put in more bids.

hornluv
12-23-2008, 01:27 PM
Checked the thread pitch, and it appears to be 10 TPI. A quicky check with a caliper says that the diameter is 1.236".

Thanks. I'm surprised the thread is that course. Seems like that heavy a feed would really punish the tip on a drill bit, especially smaller ones (1/2" and below).

djc
12-23-2008, 03:39 PM
Does anyone have one that would be willing to fill us in on the thread pitch used to advance the drill? I was thinking 20 TPI would probably be about right. That would advance the drill .050" per revolution, but it wouldn't be so fine that it would strip out easily.

From this and a later comment, I think you may be slightly misunderstanding how the drill operates. The 'feed' is not an automatic one, so it is not tied/geared in any way to the drill's rotation. You have to turn the big nut by hand/spanner to put on the cut. Obviously, the more you turn it, the harder it then is to crank the ratchet handle.

jdunmyer
12-23-2008, 04:30 PM
That screw doesn't feed the drill bit as the bit rotates, it has a large hex on the top; turning that feeds the bit as it's being rotated by the crank.

Doozer
12-23-2008, 05:22 PM
...And wouldn't it be spiffy to link the two with a slip-clutch?!?

--Doozer

hornluv
12-23-2008, 08:34 PM
OK. So you tighten the nut and it will advance the bit, which cuts while you turn the handle until all the metal is removed, then you turn the nut to advance a bit more, lather, rinse, repeat. Is that right?

jdunmyer
12-23-2008, 08:46 PM
OK. So you tighten the nut and it will advance the bit, which cuts while you turn the handle until all the metal is removed, then you turn the nut to advance a bit more, lather, rinse, repeat. Is that right?

More like turn the crank, while advancing the bit with the big hex bolt. Adjust the torque on the latter to keep the torque on the former within reason. Although I've never used mine, that's how I picture it.

Herm Williams
12-23-2008, 10:34 PM
we have one at work, if you are interested we can either list it on ebay or whatever.
re
hermwill@cox.net

andy_b
12-24-2008, 12:31 AM
so i want to be sure i get this correct.
that big nut on top is connected to the threaded shaft going through the nose of the drill. you turn the nut to advance the threaded shaft.
inside the threaded shaft is another shaft that is free to spin inside the threaded shaft, and the top end of it has the ratcheting mechanism and the bottom end holds the drill chuck.
is that correct?
if so, i didn't realize that was how they worked. i also thought that the threaded shaft was part of the shaft holding the drill chuck and as the shaft turned it advanced and also spun the drill chuck. now i understand why a Cole drill would be so useful.

andy b.

rgbai
12-24-2008, 01:40 AM
This is a picture of the nut. i sold this one on ebay a while back it was made of
aluminum so i would think it would be easy to cast one. i also have a cast iron
one that I'm keeping

rgbai
12-24-2008, 01:41 AM
oops forgot the picture.
http://i223.photobucket.com/albums/dd320/rgbai/006.jpg

jdunmyer
12-24-2008, 09:30 AM
so i want to be sure i get this correct.
that big nut on top is connected to the threaded shaft going through the nose of the drill. you turn the nut to advance the threaded shaft.
inside the threaded shaft is another shaft that is free to spin inside the threaded shaft, and the top end of it has the ratcheting mechanism and the bottom end holds the drill chuck.
is that correct?
if so, i didn't realize that was how they worked. i also thought that the threaded shaft was part of the shaft holding the drill chuck and as the shaft turned it advanced and also spun the drill chuck. now i understand why a Cole drill would be so useful.


Andy,
That's exactly correct. I first saw the Cole Drill in one of Guy Lautard's Machinist Bedside Readers, he wrote glowingly of its capabilities. When I saw one at a flea market, I just had to have it. Unfortunately, I've never had occassion to use it. A friend sent me a copy of the original sales literature, which is also more or less the instruction manual; it wouldn't surprise me if it's online somewhere.

You can clamp the thing upside down, on the side of a truck frame, or wherever, then go to work.

mister honey
12-24-2008, 09:44 AM
rgbai,

What is the length of the piece of 1-1/8" diameter barstock that attaches the upper apparatus to the base?

My Cole is missing that piece!

Thanks!

Mike




oops forgot the picture.
http://i223.photobucket.com/albums/dd320/rgbai/006.jpg

JCHannum
12-24-2008, 09:56 AM
The barstock can be any length needed to accomodate the work being performed.

The Cole drill is only one part of the equation. The Cole vise is the second. The vise can be used as a blacksmith leg vise, pipe wrench, clamp and other functions. Together the vise and drill make a versatile portable tool set that is capable of many tasks not accomplished with normal tools, and they require no power beyond the imagination of the user.

http://dfennell.com/mmtprod.html

Herm Williams
12-24-2008, 11:29 AM
Google "cole drill" for answers to almost all your questions. The weight of the complete drill kit less the drill chuck is almost 70 #.
re
herm

jdunmyer
12-24-2008, 06:04 PM
The bar is 15" long on my Cole Drill.

mister honey
12-24-2008, 07:08 PM
Thank you for your response!

Best regards,

Mike

bruto
12-25-2008, 10:24 AM
so i want to be sure i get this correct.
that big nut on top is connected to the threaded shaft going through the nose of the drill. you turn the nut to advance the threaded shaft.
inside the threaded shaft is another shaft that is free to spin inside the threaded shaft, and the top end of it has the ratcheting mechanism and the bottom end holds the drill chuck.
is that correct?
if so, i didn't realize that was how they worked. i also thought that the threaded shaft was part of the shaft holding the drill chuck and as the shaft turned it advanced and also spun the drill chuck. now i understand why a Cole drill would be so useful.

andy b.The main shaft is free to turn in the nut, but as the bit bears down on the work, it bears on the base of the nut and tends to contribute to the turning of the nut - not usually enough to self feed, but the nut is easy to advance by hand. It's a pretty clever design.

I must confess, however, that although I have had one of these drills for many years, and tried it out just because I had it, I have never really found I needed it. On the other hand, if and when I do, I suspect that nothing else will do quite so well, so I keep it. Now all I have to do is try to remember where I misplaced the v attachment for the base. That turned out to be the most useful part, useable on a drill press, and it's gone walkabout.

The vise, on the other hand, has been in regular use for the last 20-plus years. It's very versatile and very tough.