PDA

View Full Version : Impressive motorcycle project...



x39
12-18-2008, 09:30 PM
Harley lower end with a Ducati top. Safe to say this guy doesn't spend much of his spare time vegging in front of the TV!
www.desmohog.com

wierdscience
12-18-2008, 09:37 PM
Okay,I'm impressed.When do we see a video with it running?

T_henry
12-18-2008, 11:19 PM
Check this one out http://www.jrlcycles.com

x39
12-18-2008, 11:28 PM
Check this one out http://www.jrlcycles.com
I wonder how long the fuel supply on that rascal lasts!

Dragons_fire
12-19-2008, 12:14 AM
Check this one out http://www.jrlcycles.com

this one must be worth lots!!! the engine is made from aeronautical aluminum and billet steel!!!

rockrat
12-19-2008, 08:14 PM
Check this one out http://www.jrlcycles.com

I have seen these before. Man what fun. I enjoy hearing the big bombers fire up at the air show. The engines make a very unique noise.

Had an old Mustang buzz over the house a bit low when I was on the roof once. The sound was incredible. I wonder what a bike like that would cost. Probably enough that I couldn't afford it.

rock~

Doc Nickel
12-19-2008, 09:39 PM
this one must be worth lots!!! the engine is made from aeronautical aluminum and billet steel!!!

-Considering they don't use the term "engine" even once in their site- they keep calling it a "motor"- why would you be surprised? :D

Doc.

Spin Doctor
12-19-2008, 10:07 PM
The Ducati purists have to be pulling their hair out. ONE STRAND AT A TIME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

mark61
12-19-2008, 10:37 PM
That radial engine is nothing new. Go look at Vincent motorcycles. There engines were 2 cylinders from radial air plane engines. Beautifull machines out ragously priced anymore!

mark61

Your Old Dog
12-20-2008, 08:44 AM
Check this one out http://www.jrlcycles.com

I wonder how hard it would be to turn? Seems like you'd have gobs of centrifugal force :D Might make a nice drag bike if you could aim it properly down the track. I know of no mechanical engine that sounds as pretty as a radial, just buckles the knees.

torker
12-20-2008, 08:55 AM
YOD... did you miss this run down the track...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXRic0X8aA0&feature=related

Carld
12-20-2008, 10:18 AM
Sooo, tell me, what is the advantage of building a Ducley engine? Just to say you can do it?

Spin Doctor
12-20-2008, 10:31 AM
Sooo, tell me, what is the advantage of building a Ducley engine? Just to say you can do it?

Better breathing perhaps. Zero valve float at higher RPM for darn sure. And then there is the just plain WOW factor. And I was right about the Ducati purists. The reaction I got at my Saturday morning coffee was "that is so wrong".

About the radials turning ability. I really don't think the engine torque is going to affect that much as it is at 90D to the bikes centerline and I would think a big rear tire would have even more effect. Now if it was a rotary :rolleyes". And I think we could call it a Ducarley

RobbieKnobbie
12-20-2008, 02:30 PM
Uhmmm, ok... so you go to all that trouble to get a little better breathing... you're still bound by a harley bottom end. You wind up with a motor that cant spin high, leaks oil, vibrates... and costs an arm and a leg to set the valves.

Peter S
12-20-2008, 05:52 PM
That radial engine is nothing new. Go look at Vincent motorcycles. There engines were 2 cylinders from radial air plane engines. Beautifull machines out ragously priced anymore!

mark61

mark61,

I know there are lots of odd stories out there, but thats a new one to me. I have read a few books about the design of the Vincent engines and can assure you there is nothing aero about them. Vincent HRD were building single cylinder 500cc engines for some years before the vee-twin. The story goes that in 1936 designer Phil Irving saw two 500cc drawings laid on top of each other and got the idea for a vee-twin. Phil Vincent agreed and the Series A Rapide appeared in 1936, using as many 500cc parts as possible (e.g. cylinder and heads, pistons and many frame parts etc).

I agree about the prices though.

speedy
12-20-2008, 06:07 PM
Sooo, tell me, what is the advantage of building a Ducley engine? Just to say you can do it?

Any mod to a harley has to be an improvement??

Little Jon
12-20-2008, 11:33 PM
Harley lower end with a Ducati top. Safe to say this guy doesn't spend much of his spare time vegging in front of the TV!
www.desmohog.com
I can't imagine using 2 lemmons to make a sweet ride.
Due to cutbacks the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off.

Michael Moore
12-20-2008, 11:54 PM
Way cooler than that is a Rotax with Duc top end and special chassis

http://www.ti-racing.com/gallery.html

Something that is really a race bike, not just a "look how much bling I can throw at this bike" project.

They are working on eventually building all the engine themselves to offer complete bikes for sale.

cheers,
Mcihael

John Stevenson
12-21-2008, 07:31 AM
That radial engine is nothing new. Go look at Vincent motorcycles. There engines were 2 cylinders from radial air plane engines. Beautifull machines out ragously priced anymore!

mark61

I think the confusion came about because Vincents did make an aero engine called the Picador

http://www.myvincent.co.uk/gallery.php?id=31

This was a failed project although a lot of engines were built for testing.
It was based on the standard engine but simplified quite a bit due the the fact that these engines would not have a long life, being designed to be shot down.

The timing gear was on bronze bushes instead of needle rollers and the valve gear was simplified.

Many of these engines found their way into the hands of the sidecar racers in the late 60's to 80's as a very cheap source of spares.

.

bob ward
12-21-2008, 10:26 AM
The story goes that in 1936 designer Phil Irving saw two 500cc drawings laid on top of each other and got the idea for a vee-twin.

Phil Irving a very very clever man, but probably little known outside UK, OZ, and NZ car and bike racing circles.

Involved in AJS, Velocette, Vincent and the Formula 1 Repco Brabham engine.

One of his spare time projects in the 60s was to cobble 2 Peugeot 4 cylinder engine blocks onto a common crankcase to create a V8 for the family Peugeot 403.

There is a hard to find nowadays autobiography from 1992.

John Stevenson
12-21-2008, 10:56 AM
Part of the history here.

http://www.vincent-hrd.co.uk/story.html

He's also responsible for writing Tuning for Speed.

.

robert
12-21-2008, 02:37 PM
Here is another interesting machine with a mix of parts.
http://www.devinsportscars.com/BeltDrive.html

gnm109
12-21-2008, 08:03 PM
mark61,

I know there are lots of odd stories out there, but thats a new one to me. I have read a few books about the design of the Vincent engines and can assure you there is nothing aero about them. Vincent HRD were building single cylinder 500cc engines for some years before the vee-twin. The story goes that in 1936 designer Phil Irving saw two 500cc drawings laid on top of each other and got the idea for a vee-twin. Phil Vincent agreed and the Series A Rapide appeared in 1936, using as many 500cc parts as possible (e.g. cylinder and heads, pistons and many frame parts etc).

I agree about the prices though.


After 1954 when the Indian Co. went out of business in Springfield, Mass., many Indian dealers switched to British bikes to keep the doors open. I worked for an Indian dealer in Chicago around that time and he sold Vincent, Velocette, Royal Enfield and an occasional AJS/Matchless.

It was quite common to see a 500cc. Vincent Comet in Chicago in that era. It looked like a V-twin Vincent in every respect except for the missing rear cylinder.

At that time, a Vincent Rapide (1000cc) was selling for $1,450 which was a small fortune.

bollie7
12-21-2008, 08:45 PM
So whats the go with these bikes with a solid rear end? The roads over there must be a great deal better than ours here in Oz if you can get away with no rear suspension. I'm not really a bike person (the black sheep of the family in that respect LOL. My Brother & Uncle are into restoring vintage & veteran bikes)

bollie7

x39
12-21-2008, 10:55 PM
So whats the go with these bikes with a solid rear end?
Beyond aesthetics, the only real advantage would be on a bike used for drag racing, as rigid frames are lighter than frames with suspension, and there is no power lost on launch due to the suspension compressing.