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HarryG
12-20-2008, 11:05 PM
Newby here, first welding post!

My Lincoln AC/DC “buzz-box” is mounted on a portable table that's based on a semi-live skid with angle iron frame, etc., and I've always just stood next to the table to weld.

I picked up a book a couple days ago (Motorbooks Workshop, “How to Weld” by Todd Bridigum, 2008). The author comments in several sections of this book, “Before you start welding, get comfortable”. Getting comfortable includes sitting on a stool or chair and resting one of your elbows on the table.

It obviously works for the author, but also flies in the face of the safety rules I've seen in the basic “how to get started” welding books and pamphlets: “Don't rest any parts of your body on the workpiece...”

I'm self-taught and don't weld every day; in fact, I may go several weeks or more without going near the welder. So, I'm curious about the guys on here who have much more experience than me - do you sit down and rest your elbows on the table while arc welding?

Lu47Dan
12-20-2008, 11:16 PM
Harry , the do not rest any parts of your body on the work piece statement is a CYA statement for sure . I am a steamfitter , plumber and a welder in my real life , I have had to lay down on the pipe I was welding to get to some of the welds I have done . But being comfortable when welding is the best advice , If you are uncomfortable it leads to the shakes or fatigue then your welds will suffer for it . Being uncomfortable also leads to diminished desire to practice and welding proficiently takes practice . JMTC Dan

torker
12-21-2008, 12:01 AM
Sitting down while arc welding can be REAL uncomfortable....when the sizzlers fly off the table and land in your lap. But...if you can avoid that...then it is better to be comfortable. BTW..I almost ALWAYS anchor my left elbow someplace while welding....and it's usually on the workpiece.
I'm not quite sure how one can avoid touching a lot of parts I've welded...when you have to sit,stand or lay on them...cuz that's where you gotta be.
Welding is a game of great finesse....you have to be steady to achive that.

hardtail
12-21-2008, 11:24 AM
Don't see a lot sitting for stick but you can if the job lends itself on tig.

speedy
12-21-2008, 03:55 PM
Sitting down while arc welding can be REAL uncomfortable....when the sizzlers fly off the table and land in your lap. But...if you can avoid that...then it is better to be comfortable. BTW..I almost ALWAYS anchor my left elbow someplace while welding....and it's usually on the workpiece.
Welding is a game of great finesse....you have to be steady to achive that.

Ha ha I can empathise with that. Welding from a 'chair also plays extra havoc with the clothes with burnt overalls or shirts and jeans. I have some sheets of fire retardant clothing material that I lay on my lap and pin (in bib like fashion) to my top half. It works well when I remember to 'dress' correctly.
Then there are the punctures:eek: Pneaumatic tyres dont like hot slag; I really should get some solids;)
On the brightside, I do have a good excuse for not welding overhead and I can now wear my cap the correct way round.

Dawai
12-21-2008, 04:23 PM
I think it was Hoffman who caught a tig ball in his lap burning something rather important to him.. Seems it took months for it to heal properly. I forget the details other than it wasn't funny.

My old buddy in a wheelchair, he caught a bunch of lathe swarf in his lap.. not fun.. It'd be hard to continue a hobby that hurt you pretty bad. The machine shops would burn him a new one for ten minutes work thou and he was near as cheap as I am.

That all being said, the most used item in my shop is a smallish one inch thick work table.. it has two 2x2 sockets that hold various tools, vices.. benders.. and my chairs go under it to weld on top of the table or in the vices.. Hard to work a pedal on a tig and stand..

hardtail
12-21-2008, 06:21 PM
True most stools do pose a problem to effectively work the foot pedal........solution, maybe one of the best welding tables ever.........

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/showthread.php?t=169917

Adjust your work to you.

speedy
12-21-2008, 07:02 PM
Harry. Keep a short piece of 1" board close by. It provides a safe arm / elbow etc rest area from hot steel. and cold steel for that matter

I think it was Hoffman who caught a tig ball in his lap burning something rather important to him.. Seems it took months for it to heal properly. I forget the details other than it wasn't funny.
My old buddy in a wheelchair, he caught a bunch of lathe swarf in his lap.. not fun.. It'd be hard to continue a hobby that hurt you pretty bad. The machine shops would burn him a new one for ten minutes work thou and he was near as cheap as I am.
That all being said, the most used item in my shop is a smallish one inch thick work table.. it has two 2x2 sockets that hold various tools, vices.. benders.. and my chairs go under it to weld on top of the table or in the vices.. Hard to work a pedal on a tig and stand..
That reminds me, and maybe I have mentioned it before. Years ago before I became reliant on the 'chair I was working with my boilermaker mate cutting and fabricating a access hatch way up a chimney stack.
Hot slag entered my unbuttoned overalls and made its way down my right leg and came to rest at my calf boot. It had'nt finished yet and continued to roast its way in. I had to endure it as there was no where to go (except a long way down) and no hand rail to speak of. The long short of it, it got infected and medication didnt work. My dog Tan worked at it with his tongue for a week and it healed no worries.
I do not know if I would entertain the same cure if the slag had stopped in my lap region though.:)

mark61
12-29-2008, 08:50 AM
90% of the welding I do regularly is sitting down. We have section of T slotted machine tables at various hights from the floor and bench, stools and cobled together chairs to suit the different hights. There are days and weeks when I do nothing but layer build up of 7018 and or Hastalloy an inch think for remachinng worn surfaces. Also I weld up worn and broken machine tools in the pockets where the inserts go. No way could i stand up and free hand weld those small edges! Sit down. Prop tool at comfortable hieghts. Place elbows on knees and sometimes grab the rod with my left hand down near the end to keep from b$tching up an area that does NOT need welded.

You get old and ache fast enough. Be comfortable until then!

mark61