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torker
12-23-2008, 10:57 AM
I'm here to tell you...this works amazingly well.
I think it was Ries who mentioned it before.
I was using a punch station on my turret punch this morning that I hadn't used before (11/16" holes in 3/8" plate.).
Was punching just fine...but stripping the part off...holy smoke!!!
It was putting a huge strain on the turret plate. I think the punch may be worn...sorta squashed out around the end)
I remembered the oiling tip...
Squirted a dab of oil around each hole and could NOT believe the difference. The turret plate never even budged as the part was stripped off.
Funny how you pay more attention to things like this when you own the machine huh?
I've punch thousands of holes on ironworkers and prolly would have never bothered to pay heed to anything like that.
Now I own one and want it to last.
A couple lil' dabs of oil prolly just saved me a lot of money down the road. Thanks!
Russ

Ken_Shea
12-23-2008, 11:05 AM
Russ,
11/16 in 3/8" is a pretty good punch, what tonnage is your Iron Worker?


Ken

kbmindustries
12-23-2008, 11:07 AM
I have a 65 ton Scotchman....Agreed

Even with a new die and punch...This typically happens when we're punching 13/16 x 1-1/4 slots the angle/plate comes up against the stripper block and deforms the steel. Valvoline gear oil works wonders every 5-10 cycles

torker
12-23-2008, 12:16 PM
Ken..it's just a little 40 ton Scottie. I love it...maybe a bit small but it does anything I need. Love the turret punches....I'm glad I decided to go with this one out of the two I could have had.
KB...That is a pretty serious slot!

quasi
12-23-2008, 12:44 PM
I have found when broaching square holes for cutters in shop made boring bars (als Frank Maclean) that oiling makes the bit cut an order of magnitude easier.

Doozer
12-23-2008, 03:35 PM
Put a sponge (kitchen sink kind) above the stripper plate. Punch a hole in the sponge first. Keep the sponge saturated with oil. This works well. I used to have a 120 ton scotchman. I used rigid brand black pipe threading oil.
--Doozer

torker
12-23-2008, 03:53 PM
Put a sponge (kitchen sink kind) above the stripper plate. Punch a hole in the sponge first. Keep the sponge saturated with oil. This works well. I used to have a 120 ton scotchman. I used rigid brand black pipe threading oil.
--Doozer
Smartalek :D........why didn't I think of that? Good tip...
Thanks!
Russ

lane
12-23-2008, 06:43 PM
Their is a special oil made for that. Not sure what it is called .The boss calls it stripping oil .We have 3 55 gallon drums full at work. they paint it on the steel with a paint brush before punching are bending stuff. and it makes a world of difference.. It reminds me of about 90 # gear oil but real sticky like vactory # 4 and stringy.

Fasttrack
12-23-2008, 06:54 PM
Their is a special oil made for that. Not sure what it is called .The boss calls it stripping oil .We have 3 55 gallon drums full at work. they paint it on the steel with a paint brush before punching are bending stuff. and it makes a world of difference.. It reminds me of about 90 # gear oil but real sticky like vactory # 4 and stringy.


Yep - for the Formula Car team, we have to do some really wacky bends in all sorts of chrome-moly. The stuff we use is Shell RF 160. Its made for stamping, pressing, bending, and punching. Actually I think they say it is particularly well suited to aluminum, but we mostly handle the chrome-moly. The neat thing about it is that it evaporates from the material so you brush it on and have about 30 minutes to do what your doing before it evaporates. I guess they call it "rinse-free oil".

Ries
12-26-2008, 11:30 AM
I use this stuff called Punch-Eaze, from Cleveland Punch- I bought a quart of it about 2 years ago, still have half of it.
I have a sawed off mountain dew can on top of the ironworker with a chip brush in it, lube up the punch every once in a while.
It seems to last about 5 times as long as oil, is clear, so you can still see what you are doing, doesnt smell bad, and doesnt burst into flame when you weld.

Cost more than used motor oil, its true. But it is the best stuff I have ever used for lubing punches. We do a lot of stainless, and even with lube, that stuff BANGS when you punch it.

DR
12-26-2008, 03:04 PM
Yep, lubrication is good.

Having the correct punch/die clearance for the material thickness is another important factor.

Grinding some shear on the punches helps too.