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MinnesotaHSM
01-02-2009, 01:57 PM
My Mother-in-law's cookie press handle broke off this Christmas. Since the relatives now associate me with metal, I am the one she called upon to fix it for her.

Anyway, the cookie press is aluminum. Here are the pictures.

This shows how the handle should be attached.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo9/vipertml/DSCF3274c.jpg

This shows the current pieces.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo9/vipertml/DSCF3278c.jpg

This shows the small internal clearance with the plunger.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo9/vipertml/DSCF3277C.jpg

Any ideas on how to fix this? She would like the handle on, as opposed to just sealing the holes. Looks like there is some residual glue which I don't know if that is from the manufacturer or my father-in-law.

We have an updated model from the same manufacturer. They no longer make them with the handle, probably due to the potential for breakage.

Your help is appreciated.

-T

Liger Zero
01-02-2009, 02:01 PM
Looks like it was spot-welded? Find someone with aluminum weld-fu (if you don't know how) and have them render an opinion on the situation.

...most welders when asked to render an opinion on welding aluminum share the exact same opinion and it is spelled $&#!! unless you pay them in cash and beer. :D

doctor demo
01-02-2009, 02:19 PM
My Mother-in-law's cookie press handle broke off this Christmas. Since the relatives now associate me with metal, I am the one she called upon to fix it for her.

Anyway, the cookie press is aluminum. Here are the pictures.

This shows how the handle should be attached.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo9/vipertml/DSCF3274c.jpg

This shows the current pieces.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo9/vipertml/DSCF3278c.jpg

This shows the small internal clearance with the plunger.



http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo9/vipertml/DSCF3277C.jpg

Any ideas on how to fix this? She would like the handle on, as opposed to just sealing the holes. Looks like there is some residual glue which I don't know if that is from the manufacturer or my father-in-law.

We have an updated model from the same manufacturer. They no longer make them with the handle, probably due to the potential for breakage.

Your help is appreciated.

-T
Make her a new cookie press body out of stainless and tig weld on nice ergonomic handle. Then just use the gutsfrom the old press.
My wife is gettin quite a colection of shop made ss cookie cutters etc, seems like she allways needs a new something when I'm trying to finish a part for Myself.

Steve

TGTool
01-02-2009, 04:01 PM
That's the kind of PITA repair I'd try to avoid doing if possible.

However, if it had to be done, I'd make a small dimple from the inside to accommodate the head of a flat head rivet. Then drill the holes in the handle for the rivet body, and also drill holes opposite on the outside part of the handle. You may also need to make a small countersink on that inside face of the handle to seat the dimple in the body. Then you've got a place to put a punch through to set the rivet while it's bucked from the inside. A large piece of round stock held in the vise might give you the backup you need to set the rivet. Check to make sure the plunger can clear on the inside and file or grind as necessary.

Fasttrack
01-02-2009, 04:17 PM
There is also the possibility of aluminum brazing. They sell aluminum repair kits for window flashing and what not. It uses some kind of nasty flux, so you'd want to be sure to get it all real clean before making cookies with it! Anyway, it seemed to work well for me. I was brazing some compartments in a tray made from aluminum diamond plate. The joints haven't broken yet ('course there is virtually no load on them!) If you are familiar with ordinary brazing, its not much different. Practice a bit on scrap and you'll probably be able to braze on the handle and leave it looking clean and professional.


... not sure what the heat would do though. Have to be careful not to warp the tube.

ckelloug
01-02-2009, 04:19 PM
I like the rivet idea.

Scishopguy
01-02-2009, 04:41 PM
I second the rivets. If you get some aluminum rivets be sure to heat them in the oven on low heat for an hour or so to aneal them. It will make them much easier to work with.

Look at the bright side, if you fix the handle for her it will insure that you always get lots of cookies. :D

johnnyd
01-02-2009, 05:12 PM
There is a "solder" available that allowes the repair of aluminum,zinc, & various other white metals. It will also attach brass,copper & other metals together. It is basicly? an aluminum/zinc alloy rod with a very low melting point. A quick google search for ...soldering aluminum.... came up with a pruduct called....Dura Fix... You may find it at the local swap meet or flea market.

capperbar
01-02-2009, 05:41 PM
We just replaced that exact broken press. I think we still have it. let me know if you goof the repair and want to try another.
Sav

torker
01-02-2009, 05:47 PM
Was me and I wanted to fix it quick...put it back where it came from then tack the sides of the handle to the body. 4.387 minute job.
If the thing will come apart...short back cap on the tig torch...MIGHT reach in there....creative bending on the tig rod :D...eyes crossed...hold breath..
Clean, clean ,clean...but I'm bettin more cooking oil, etc are in that metal than you think.
Russ

lwalker
01-02-2009, 06:12 PM
Glue? The glass-fiber handle of my wood maul is glued to the steel head with epoxy and I doubt it's ever coming loose.

I bought some JB-Weld last summer for aluminum-aluminum adhesive on the recommendation of some on this board, but I haven't tried it yet.

SGW
01-02-2009, 06:19 PM
Maybe a band (or two) around the outside of the cylinder to attach the handle to.

Mike Burdick
01-02-2009, 08:55 PM
I'd just drill out the old rivet in the handle, fit back together and then tig weld both holes shut, thereby welding both handle and cup together. Finish with die grinder and sand paper. This way all the welding is done on the outside so size of equipment will not matter. When completed no one will ever know the repair took place.

Maybe someone on the board that has some tig equipment will do it for you if you pay postage both ways.

rockrat
01-02-2009, 10:36 PM
No matter what you do, fix it! A man can not live on metal alone, he needs cookies also.

I had to make an emergency cookie press repair last year. And thank goodness I did cause this years cookies are so good.

rock~

torker
01-02-2009, 11:55 PM
Whoa Mike...two layers of alu...the bottom one being thinner...and prolly really dirty(that stuff is thin...very hard to clean it right and have anything left...)...that could be a tough weld job.
I'm seeing the bottom hole getting really big...really fast.
For that small, thin stuff...you don't have the control with tig on ac. You'd have so much heat into the thicker piece...you'd vapourize the bottom hole into a swimmin hole size real quick.
And you are going to suck dirty air in between the two pieces...guaranteed.

J. Randall
01-03-2009, 12:30 AM
You could use a couple small stainless screws, shape the heads for clearance on the inside if needed, slip the handle on them an nut it down, trim of any protruding threads. You also have enough surface there that JB Weld would probably hold it.
James

Optics Curmudgeon
01-03-2009, 01:28 AM
Holy crappo! My family had exactly the same cookie press, and had exactly the same thing happen. My father wrapped the thing in filament tape and they used it that way for another ten years.

Joe

BillH
01-03-2009, 01:38 AM
braze it on with some lead solder and some mercury flux.







:)

dockrat
01-03-2009, 02:11 AM
A couple of large screw type hose clamps if you just want functionality and not beauty

macona
01-03-2009, 03:40 AM
Second the hose clamps. But not the screw ones. The Band-it ones:

http://www.hosexpress.com/bandit/banditjrclampsandtools.htm

See, you fix it, save the day, and get a new tool!

Your Old Dog
01-03-2009, 08:12 AM
Well, if her cookies are any good, I'd use aluminum welding rod as rivets. I've had great success doing that. In this case, I'd secure a 1 3/4 pipe in a vice to use as an anvil, drill the next size hole so its a clean hole, put the aluminum rod in there and whoomp on it for a bit. It might not look too good but because the material is kind of whimpy, you might want to put some band/hose clamps over the handles tabs to add some moral support.

If she still has a good grip and doesn't need the handle then just fill in the holes and toss the handle.

If her cookies suck then I'd tell her it's beyond repair and be grateful she broke it :D

Do you do estate, yard and garage sales at all? They show up there all the time. Take her's home and tell her you'll have it for next Christmas the yard sale like crazy. When you find one give it to her and tell her it took the better part of the Summer but you did fix it for her. (leave your wife out of the loop) !

torker
01-03-2009, 08:20 AM
If her cookies suck then I'd tell her it's beyond repair and be grateful she broke it :D


LOL! I know it's early yet but that has to win "Funniest Post of The Day"!

winchman
01-03-2009, 12:56 PM
Whatever happened to just rolling the dough out and using a cookie cutter? Or rolling out more dough and walking out with a box of cookies?

I've had really good luck using JBWeld to bond aluminum pieces together. I doubt the cured material would be affected by the dough or soapy water. Nothing I've tried will touch it.

Roger