PDA

View Full Version : Fageol (the first bus)



aostling
01-02-2009, 04:01 PM
Yesterday I drove through Goldfield, on US95. It was New Years day, and nothing was open. It's largely a ghost town, though it was once the largest city in Nevada. As always, I drove on some of the back streets, which have miles of dilapidated cabins and ruined foundations. There is a lot of old machinery, now with a coating of snow.

Behind a derelict hotel I found this old Fageol coach. It has wicker passenger seats. Fageol was the first vehicle designed as a bus "from the ground up."

Anybody know what it used for a powerplant?

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/Fageol.jpg

IdahoJim
01-02-2009, 04:14 PM
But, I had an old Fageol Super Freighter of 1953 vintage. My folks owned it. We moved from SOCal to Montana in 1965, and then I moved the folks to Phoenix with that in 1967. When I got out of the military in 1972 I drove it to Washington from their home in Phoenix, with a stop at their ranch near Ely Nevada to drop off some furniture. Good old truck. That '53 model had an International 6 cylinder engine...I think it was a 232 cu.in.
Great pic!
Jim

Your Old Dog
01-02-2009, 04:20 PM
Nothing that nice exist outside in the great NorthEast. It's one of the things I liked most about Nevada. Was like a ride back to yesteryear. That's a great find you got there.

PackardV8
01-02-2009, 04:23 PM
4-cylinder Waukesha, 6-cyl Hall-Scotts and Cummings among others.

John Stevenson
01-02-2009, 04:26 PM
Hall- Scott ?

[Edit] Ooops PackardV8 beat me to it

aostling
01-03-2009, 02:32 AM
There was so much machinery laying around Goldfield, it's not worth a link for everything I found there. Here is another photo, of what I think might be a small yard engine. Where did the engineer sit?

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/Goldfieldsteamer-1.jpg

BillH
01-03-2009, 02:44 AM
There was so much machinery laying around Goldfield, it's not worth a link for everything I found there. Here is another photo, of what I think might be a small yard engine. Where did the engineer sit?

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/Goldfieldsteamer-1.jpg

Uh oh, now you've done it, I feel a need to read up on this town and find out the history of the railroad!
That looks like a neat little 0-6-0 tank engine, probably a switcher. Not too ancient, has piston valves and walsheart valve gear, and air brakes, around 1915 would seam right...

The cab is missing, the engineer and fireman would sit to the right of your picture behind the firedoor of the boiler your looking at. Fireman to the left, engineer to the right.
It was used for tight radius track, probably servicing local industry and not a road switcher, notice the middle drivers have no flange?

John Stevenson
01-03-2009, 06:25 AM
I am surprised that no one has carted some of this stuff away ?
that bus especially if it is all abandoned.

.

Peter S
01-03-2009, 07:12 AM
I don't know much about Fageol, but they did build their own engines at some stage.

I can't find the right book at the moment, but I think they may have even built OHC engines. In the 1940's Fageol was building six cylinder, 18-valve engines (OHC from memory). Ed Winfield was a consultant for Fageol around this time, and apparently designed an improved combustion chamber and cam for this engine. Fageol raced a smaller-displacement version of this at Indy in 1948, the car survives in the Indianapolis Speedway Museum.

Lou Fageol went racing at Indy in the early 1940's, mainly using old Miller-Fords with Offy engines, this included the 'Fageol Twin Coach Special' which used two blown Offy midget engines and two of the Miller-Ford transaxles for FWD...

edit: removed incorrect bit and added -I found the book with photo of the Fageol engine used at Indianapolis. It is a distinctive looking engine because it has 12 exhaust pipes (two exhaust valves per cylinder), and OHC. It produced 260 hp at 5,000 rpm, not bad for a 1940's bus engine.

Rustybolt
01-03-2009, 11:19 AM
John. It might be a state or national historic site. Or somebody might just own it all. I which case it is illegal to haul stuff off.

aostling
01-03-2009, 02:16 PM
John. It might be a state or national historic site. Or somebody might just own it all. I which case it is illegal to haul stuff off.

That's right, it is a protected historical district. There are about a hundred-odd people living in Goldfield, keeping an eye on things.

If you took something, you might make a getaway on this free motorcycle. But there is a sheriff in town, and you'd be nabbed before you got to Tonopah (an hour's drive to the north).

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/Goldfieldmotorcycle.jpg