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tony ennis
01-04-2009, 12:30 PM
In woodworking, the bench is everything. It has to be solid and sturdy. You spend a lot of time there. In metalworking, perhaps not so much? You spend your time on the machines.

What is essential about your bench? What size is it? What's it made of? What did you do wrong? Right?

I have the amazing flooding basement, so I won't be doing anything too beautiful. In fact, I see pressure treated lumber in my future. I'm seeing 6' x 2' with the typical vise mounted directly over the front left leg. 4x4 legs, 2x4s around the top and bottom of the legs, and 3/4 plywood on top, maybe laminated. I won't be working on heavy things like real engines. It's hard to get them into the basement...

small.planes
01-04-2009, 12:37 PM
Mine used to be built from 2x4s with a 1/4" plate steel top and lots of diagonal bracing.
That had to go to make room for the mill, so now my bench is a 4'x2'6" surface table :)
The Vice is mounted on a safe, I couldnt bring myself to drill the surface table, even if it was cheap.

Vice mount:
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn274/small_planes/SSC_3993.jpg

You can see the bench lurking in the background, its covered in stuff as Im in the process of moving all the equipment around (again...)
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn274/small_planes/SSC_3981.jpg

Dave

Dragons_fire
01-04-2009, 12:45 PM
heres mine... 2x4s and 1/5" plywood..

http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t305/dragons_fire_photo/IMG_0370.jpg

barts
01-04-2009, 12:50 PM
My bench frame is welded from 3" square tube...the top is from a old gardening bench my wife's mother made many years ago; it's something like 1"x3" lumber nailed flat sides together. I belt-sanded it smooth and epoxied it. I let it clear, but use a piece of masonite as work surface. The bench has a power strip (plug-mold) that runs all the way along it in front, and a large import spinning vice bolted to the left front corner. There's pegboard to the rear and right full of tools.... I welded on feet w/ holes to bolt it to the floor, but so far that hasn't proven necessary.

In retrospect, I should have cut down the top, as it a bit too wide for me to reach the peg board easily, and stuff accumulates as on any bench.

jacampb2
01-04-2009, 12:51 PM
My main work table in my shop is made of a piece of 28"x60ish" .5" mild steel plate. The legs are 3" square .125" wall tube. There are some angled supports from each leg to the bottom of the plate top, and a shelf about half way down made out of rough cut oak. The table is primarily my welding table, but it spends a lot of its time doubling as a work bench, as it rarely moves and I can put damn near anything on top of it I want. I have a big bench vise mounted in one corner and holes drilled throughout the table to allow me to bolt on various add ons when needed.

I could not do what I do with a wood bench. Even if sheeted in some light steel to allow it to be a welding table. I simply beat on it to much and well as get all sorts of nasties on it when working on greasy, grimy old parts and machines. Granted, a wood table could likely built just as strong, or stronger, but not by me. I don't have the patience for wood work. I think I burned this bench together in about 3 hours when I got my Miller 251.

Later,
Jason

SGW
01-04-2009, 01:07 PM
I made the top of mine from a sheet of 3/4" plywood, ripped the long way and glued/screwed together to make a 1 1/2" x 2' x 8' top, with a sheet of 1/4" tempered Masonite as the surface.
I bolted 4x4s to the basement wall, in a corner, 2' and 8', bolted the top down to those, and added a single leg at the free corner with the vise over it. There's also a 4x4 bolted under the front edge. Since it's bolted to the wall, it Does Not Move.
I find that 2' depth is plenty,

Paul Alciatore
01-04-2009, 01:18 PM
I also have done wood work and like a large, flat bench for that. 3' X 8' minimum, better 4'+ X 10' and in the middle of the room.

In my metal shop, the main thing I want is a bench solid enough to hole a large vise without moving about when working on things in it - sawing, filing, hammering, etc. The next thing is space. That's a joke because any space is immediately occupied with ... whatever, it is 100 % occupied. And a lot of electric outlets.

My benches (plural) are constructed with double thick 5/8" flake board and have a 1X2 lip to prevent things from rolling off. The lip sticks up about 1/4" above the top so it does not get in the way. I have a 2X4 frame under them, but would use 2X6 if doing it again to make them more sturdy. My vise is mounted near one set of legs to give greater rigidity. And the benches are firmly attached to the walls with steel angle brackets so they don't move. I finished them with about four coats of polyurethene varnish.

I don't presently do any welding but if/when I did/do I would have a bench designed for that. Probably with a steel top.

dockrat
01-04-2009, 01:40 PM
Mine is constructed with a 2x4 and 2x6 frame. 11' long by 2' wide. Pegboard behind. The top has a layer of 3/4 plywood then that was overlayed with a bunch of leftover 2" oak flooring hardwood. Makes a good solid work surface. 24 various sized drawers built in to keep the stuff off the top of the bench. (But it still accumulates :D ) 3 electrical outlets wired in.Top was originaly painted brown but I have since repainted it with some light cream colored leftover paint....makes it a lot easier to see those lil tiny parts.

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh67/Dockrat1/IMGP1007Small.jpg

Because of my very limited room, my welding/layout table, disk/belt sander, table saw and miter saw are all on casters so that I can roll them out of the way when not in use. Same with my POS bandsaw. It hides behind my mill when not in use

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh67/Dockrat1/IMGP1174Medium.jpg

The cabinet at the end is a leftover from when I ripped out my old kitchen and remodeled. Its mostly metal storage

.

tony ennis
01-04-2009, 02:21 PM
mmm keep it coming. More pics!



Dragons Fire, nice B17. I'd guess an F model. Finish it!

HSS
01-04-2009, 02:40 PM
Dockrat did you clean up for the pictures? My shop very seldom looks that unused.:D
My young bride is always complaining about losing her shop because of all my junk. Junk, I sez. I have you know that junk, as you put it, happens to be a work in progress, at which she says something under her breath and walks off. Women....;)

Ryobiguy
01-04-2009, 03:35 PM
Here's a drawing of the table I designed and built: (No picture of it because it's covered with so much stuff you can't really see it!)
http://www.fricktion.net/~mfrick/table5.pdf

This may sound funny, but I designed it around the 2'x4' plywood for the bottom shelf which I had lying around -- I don't have a truck and thus can't bring home large pieces of plywood.
I thought about it a long time and had 4 other designs before this one which weren't quite good enough.

Original purpose is to have a sturdy table onto which I could roll the Brideport table. It sure is sturdy, but I filled it up with stuff so I haven't rolled the table onto it yet.
Top is out of 2x6 stock. Legs are 4x4 on the very outside of the long dimension (notice the long 2x4 under supports are on the INSIDE of the 4x4,) which gives it better balance or at least spreads the legs out further so it sits better on the lumpy concrete garage floor.

I was also looking at putting some super duty casters on to the legs which could be deployed when needed with some lever/hinge mechanism so I could put the mill table on it, and roll it around to the front of the mill and take off the saddle. Not sure if the table + saddle would overload it though.

-Matt

R W
01-04-2009, 05:09 PM
Mine is 6x2ft, legs are cut from 1935 Ford truck chassis frame 2x2 angle iron, top is made from the baling chamber sides of an international baler.Height is 3ft,a 6" back board is also from the baler.

JeffKranz
01-04-2009, 05:18 PM
Here is one of mine...

Heavy piece of granite 48 x 96 x 10" thick.

http://i422.photobucket.com/albums/pp304/woodzy9370/IM000105Medium.jpg

If you look behind the granite table you will see another one that was 36 x 96 x 12" that I needed to get rid of. My wife said these will be my tombstone.

Jeff

wierdscience
01-04-2009, 05:31 PM
I've got two Lista? workstations,3x6' with the second level shelf and the power strips built into the front of the shelf support towers.

I also have a 2x lumber bench nailed to one wall and a 5x10' welding table with a 3/4" top.

They all have the same problem,the tops are horizonal and accumilate junk:D

Woodworkers have it easy,their benches stay pretty even covered in junk:)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/wierdscience/BENCH1.jpg

isaac338
01-04-2009, 05:36 PM
Here is one of mine...

Heavy piece of granite 48 x 96 x 10" thick.




Holy.. crap. Talk about a sturdy bench, no?

That's awesome.

MickeyD
01-04-2009, 05:47 PM
I found a couple of the 5 drawer Kennedy work stations at a garage sale a couple of years ago. They have drawers on one side and a shelves on the other, and a maple top. The wood top is nice because you don't dink up your projects on it, and the shelves will hold a surprising amount of weight (one has three six inch vises and a four inch vise and it has not fallen over yet). Also, any other flat surface that is not covered gets turned into a temporary bench depending on what I am working on.

snowman
01-04-2009, 06:39 PM
Here is one of mine...

Heavy piece of granite 48 x 96 x 10" thick.

http://i422.photobucket.com/albums/pp304/woodzy9370/IM000105Medium.jpg

If you look behind the granite table you will see another one that was 36 x 96 x 12" that I needed to get rid of. My wife said these will be my tombstone.

Jeff

You would not believe the number of those I've seen go at auctions for $50, even $10 once. NOBODY wants to pay to move it!

JeffKranz
01-04-2009, 07:11 PM
I actually bought this from work. It was a silent auction and I bid $172.00. It included the steel table and they would delivery it to my barn. The only thing I needed to arrange was a fork lift to unload it from our truck. The guy across the road has a machine shop so I treked over there with $20.00 and a dozen donuts and he was over faster than I could walk back.

The smaller one (behind) was free from work but they wanted $75.00 to deliver to to me so once I bought the bigger one they bought it back from me for $75.00 and shipped it to our Alabama plant.

JoeFin
01-04-2009, 08:15 PM
No much sense in a larger bench as you can see all they do is collect things

http://i198.photobucket.com/albums/aa83/Freakindj/CNC-move010-1.jpg

darryl
01-04-2009, 09:20 PM
All of my workbenches are made from wood- 2x4s and often mdf as a top surface. The biggest mistake I often see in wood bench construction is that the legs aren't made to carry the weight of the top on their ends. Sure, the bottom of the legs do, but so often I see a horizontal 2x4 screwed to the sides of the legs at the top. This means that the weight carried by the horizontal framework (the top and everything on it) does not rest atop any of the legs, where it would be most solidly carried. Another thing I don't approve of is putting the legs right at the corners of the bench- they should be in from both ends, and in at least a bit from the front. I know this impacts the available space inside of the legs, but it reduces the sag that will occur in the top over time.

Bracing is a requirement also, not an option, and what I like to do is use solid sheet material at both ends, and either another at the back of the bench or somewhere nearer the center under the top if the bench would be available from all sides. Makes for a lot more rigid structure, and you still have storage space under the top, just not as deep from either the front or the back. Imagine a large letter H made from plywood, turned on its back and standing in the workshop. Add 2x4 legs and frame resting on top these legs, attach the top overhanging all around by some amount, and it's very solid.

The principles of how to carry the weight of a benchtop on legs apply the same to all steel construction. Use your welds to hold the assembly together, not in shear bearing the weight of the top and it's contents.

Wherever a vice is mounted, by all means add a full length support leg of 2x8 or similar directly underneath it, and screw the vice through the benchtop and into this support piece. Makes a world of difference. One of my benches is against a wall, and that's where the vice is situated. The leg I added under the vice is epoxied to the floor. I have never had or used a more solid mounting than this makes. Everything I do with the vice is nicer. Even hacksawing a bolt shorter- rigidity improves a lot of things (minds out of the gutter now- hm, I should talk-) :)

BillH
01-04-2009, 09:26 PM
Funny, just went to Loews today to buy some 2x6's, 4x4's and some nice 3/4 plywood for two workbenches. One for the Lathe, and one for the Mill when it gets here.
Anyhow, I made a drawing of it in Solidworks, anyone care to see it? I COMPLETELY ripped it from http://thehobbyistmachineshop.com/
Same benches he made, although he gave no plans, just description. Oh yeh, I made my 36" tall instead of the usual 32 or 33.
http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2p/v649/156/60/704004005/n704004005_1395839_2930.jpg

Lu47Dan
01-04-2009, 10:21 PM
I have five work benches
#1 The main work bench 8' long X 2' wide , laminated 2 X 4 top with hardened masonite to protect the 2X's , three sets of legs with the end legs set in about one foot , a 2 X 12 back board and a 2 X 8 shelf above that . One shelf below the top for power tools and other things . Legs are 2 X 4 frames with bracing .
#2 Welding bench . 50" X 29" with 1/4" top , frame is 2 X 2 X 1/8" angle , top has 1" overhang on long sides and 3" overhang on ends . Everyone who looks at it say it's too light it will never last , it has been in my shop for 20 years and is still trudging along just fine . The height is higher than most at around 33" or better . At the corners on the long sides I added tool receivers that you can plug and play an assortment of tools , vises , benders , yoke type pipe vise , and several holding jigs of my own design . The receiver tubes run from side to side and have lock bolts to steady the tooling . Shelf below is used for drop storage , adds to the benches heft when you have five to six hundred pounds of steel and welding rod under there :D
#3 &#4 are clones of one that just finally wore out two years ago they are roughly 42" x 48" with 3/4" plywood tops and are built from 4 X 4's for legs and 2 x 8's for top framing . These benches double as parts tables when I have an engine on a stand . But there main use is for heavy work tractor transmissions and such . They take a beating , the original design was cobbled together with what was at hand 24 years ago .:cool:
#5 built like 3 & 4 but smaller and held a table top mill until I retrieved it from the fellow I built it for , after he refused to pay for it . I use it for my experimental stuff . It is a sturdy bench and it is a shame I was out the money for building it , but at least I have it . :D
Pictures after I get my shop straight again . Dan

gregl
01-04-2009, 11:32 PM
I put a vise at each end and aligned the back, fixed jaws so I can hold a long piece at both ends if necessary. Handy from time to time.

Bench height is also critical. The decision depends on what you will do on it. I mostly do little fiddly stuff on mine so the height is up there just above my waist so can see stuff without bending over. But it's too high for working on stuff like cabinetry or furniture, or an auto engine.

My dream shop would have several benches at different heights with wood or Masonite tops, and a separate metal one for welding that would have an adjustable height (perhaps one of those cheap Horrible Fright lift tables?).

andy_b
01-04-2009, 11:47 PM
I made the top of mine from a sheet of 3/4" plywood, ripped the long way and glued/screwed together to make a 1 1/2" x 2' x 8' top, with a sheet of 1/4" tempered Masonite as the surface.
I bolted 4x4s to the basement wall, in a corner, 2' and 8', bolted the top down to those, and added a single leg at the free corner with the vise over it. There's also a 4x4 bolted under the front edge. Since it's bolted to the wall, it Does Not Move.
I find that 2' depth is plenty,

that's about what mine is. the legs are 2x6 spaced every 32" and i have a shelf under it that helps stabilize things and adds weight :) ). i actually have four of these, and they hold anything i put on them.

andy b.

BadDog
01-05-2009, 01:02 AM
Below is an image of my main bench (fab table) when I built it. That was the first incarnation, it has changed many times. I'm constantly tacking something onto it, using it for a while, eventually it gets in the way and I knock it off and grind the tack down. The top is 1/2" steel, so pretty solid. And the shelves are currently holding several hundred pounds of shorts/drops/scrap/etc. It currently has 4 sections of receiver hitch tubing mounted vertically. I use those to mount vises, bead rollers, benders, pseudo-anvils, various fixture tables, table extensions, in-feed rollers, all sorts of stuff. On many occasions I weld scrap to it to form a layout fixture. I made 8 (I think?) "knock down" targets for the local big shooting range (Ben Avery). So I got everything ready and tacked in pieces so I just threw the sections up there and welded. Also welded clamps in key locations. No squares, no tapes, no marking. Just through the pieces into place, clamp, weld, repeat. I built that over 6 (7?) years ago and it has served my every need from buggy fabrication, to Dana 60 axle rebuild (welded on a holding fixture for that too), and all my current machine building as well as machinist projects. The "rule" is that I never leave stuff other than the work in progress on the table, PERIOD. If I switch projects mid-stream, I box up the previous project first (unless it involves complicated tack-on fixtures). It also has a MIG gun "holster" and will soon have a huge "full extension" drawer as well (bough ball glides on ebay).

I also have a smaller table I'm building from an old boring mill t-slot table. It's about 36" x 20" and about 4 or 5" thick with big fat T-Slots. Plan is to make it portable, and use the t-slots to mount various standard fixtures without having to weld them on. Particularly things like vertical angle plates, over-center and cam clamps, notched "squares" with built in clamps for welding bevel corners, and so on. It also has a 1" thick plate of the same dimensions with 1/2" holes every 2" on a grid. Every other hole is fitted for a pin or threaded for a 1/2 bolt. Trying to figure out how to incorporate that as well.

Then there are the "mobile workstations" formed by roll around boxes. My small one is a recently liberated old-school Craftsman "Professional" (my very first!). And I've also got a couple of "Vidmar" type cabinets on casters, but they are a bit too tall to really call "work benches". However, I do have things like my SRD drill grinder setting on them. I was using it tonight, works fine at that height.

Then I've got my surface plate on a low cabinet that looks sort of like one side of '70s era steel desk, complete with drawers, but only about 2" wide. My 18 x 24 Granite Surface Plate fits on top of it very well, and the actual top has been modified to fit snugly on the surface plate. So I can set there on my mechanics stool to do sketches or make lists. Or I can remove the top to access the plate and set there to do layout/measurement as needed.

http://www.members.cox.net/baddog4x4/shop/table2.jpg

Your Old Dog
01-05-2009, 07:30 AM
I agree with Joe Fin. My bench is a little too deep and that means stuff gets pushed to the back instead of put away. My bench is an oak office door that the company, in their infinite wisdom, threw out along with about 10 others. I got 5 of them for free. They are 3'X7' and about 2" thick. The core is similar to bowling alley stock so they are extremely heavy and flat. Two 2x4 legs go to the floor on the near corners and the far side of the bench rest/bolted on a horizontal 2x4 bolted to the wall. It's very sturdy and I can reef on the vice without dragging the table all over the shop.

One question for the OP. Are you left handed? Is that why you want your vice on the left side of the bench? I am right handed and my vice is on the very corner of my right end of the bench. This means, I can stand up a piece of pipe from the floor in mine and swing the vice about 270 degrees and still file from the front of the bench instead of having to step around the bench.

The 2x4 leg on mine is positioned under the workbench just below where the vice rest. I can whoomp on the vice and all the energy gets transferred to the floor.

A.K. Boomer
01-05-2009, 10:21 AM
Oh yeh, I made my 36" tall instead of the usual 32 or 33.



A bench is a bench is a bench as long as it holds stuff and has one very critical measurement --- I cant imagine a bench thats 32" tall and im only 5'9" i experimented with different sizes just working with my arms out and stuff and settled on 40"
My bench base is made of 2 by 6 pressure treated and 2 by 6 oak top, the pic is just about a third of it as it extends and the other end has a vise mounted on it, the bench is mounted and screwed to the wall,
Its small but like Joe f states if you make it bigger you will just bury more crap on top of it:o

So far it looks like Jeff K takes the award for the bench most likely to survive a cat 5 tornado, perhaps even slow the storm down a little...

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC00399.jpg

DickDastardly40
01-05-2009, 10:33 AM
My shop benches are rather flimsy cheap metal affairs that came with the house, which I have put old kitchen countertop onto, they are mostly covered in all manner of rubbish at present.

I am considering making a 3/4" thick wooden cover for my newly acquired 6 x 26 VMC table, which with the head rotated out of the way, would in theory make a useful sturdy bench to which a vice or a chuck can be mounted vertically and is adjustable for hacksawing filing etc. It even has a worklight built in and plenty of stowage space in the drip tray to keep the tools off the bench.

What say you good folks? bad idea and deposit in the cylindrical folder or worthy of further thought?

Cheers

Evan
01-05-2009, 11:19 AM
This is the library and computer shop. Plenty of bench space.
http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/library2.jpg


http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics5/benches1.jpg

BTW, these are best case photos. If you think I am going to show you average case then you are dumber than I look. I am pretty sure when Ernie came up a little while ago he just about had a heart attack. It was pretty close to worst case then.


http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics5/benches2.jpg

Main shop overview.

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics2/shopg1.jpg

tony ennis
01-05-2009, 12:07 PM
A bench is a bench is a bench as long as it holds stuff and has one very critical measurement --- I cant imagine a bench thats 32" tall and im only 5'9"

Exactly right. Neanderthal woodworkers like lower benches as they need to get over their hand planes and other tools so they can bear down with their weight. So my WW bench is 32" - about belt height. And that's exactly why I am asking about metal working benches.

My WW bench is wider than it needs to be 24" with a 6" tray. It's totally covered in trash and the tray is full of chips and stuff that should not be there. 18" wide and trayless would have been better. So it doesn't just happen in metal working.

Regarding a previous comment about my handed-ness, I am right-handed so perhaps putting the vise at the left end is wrong. I intend to center it over a corner post.

shawnspeed
01-05-2009, 12:34 PM
Best bench I ever worked on was a piece of 3/8" hot rolled 5' x10' with a 6" backsplash bent up at the back and a 6" apron with about 1 1/4" rad on the front with 2"x2"x3/8 sq.tube for legs and bracing under the top, with a good 6" vice on one end, 30" top hight . would hold alot of weight , was relativly flat,could hammer rad's on shetmetal parts on the apron,or beat on hammerforms bolted to the top...was a bitc....to move tho...was an awsome welding table....Shawn

BigBoy1
01-05-2009, 01:15 PM
I built my work benchs for me. The top is 44" above the floor, as I'm 6'7". I got tired of always leaning over to work at benchs. A construction site was getting rid of the rough cut oak planks they had used and they said I could have all of them if I hauled it away. I made sure they were all gone within two hours. Most of the oak planking was 2" x 8" in 6 to 10 foot lengths. I made two benches with 8' by 3' tops. I covered the tops with 1/4" plywood that can be replaced when it becomes too damaged. The planking was nailed (I had to drill the holes to be able to drive the nails through the oak!) to oak cross members. Some of the 2"x4" planks were joined together to make the 4"x4" legs. They are very sturdy and solid benches.

Bill

aboard_epsilon
01-05-2009, 02:27 PM
alternative (ignore grey wiring ..is temp )
Thick angle plates in conjuction with wood
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v190/aboard_epsilon/workbench/wb2.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v190/aboard_epsilon/workbench/wb4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v190/aboard_epsilon/workbench/angleirons.jpg

cont

aboard_epsilon
01-05-2009, 02:30 PM
stainless draws, before fronts added.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v190/aboard_epsilon/workbench/6drawers.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v190/aboard_epsilon/workbench/southbenddrawer.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v190/aboard_epsilon/workbench/overallview.jpg

This is the only pic of it finished ..you can just see the draw fronts and hardwood facing on the plank top

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v190/aboard_epsilon/workbench/SOUTHBEND.jpg

other bench in other workshop is made the same way but with 4 inch thick planks...and with 12mm steel plate facing on side and tops........that bench can take all you can give it ..

cont

aboard_epsilon
01-05-2009, 02:33 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v190/aboard_epsilon/rover%20420/WORKBENCH.jpg

all the best.markj

Bunk
01-21-2009, 04:49 PM
Here is mine:
I built the top out of a 4x8 sheet of particle board cut in half and doubled over on itself for 1.5" thickness, glued on a layer of Formica, then attached it to a 2x3 frame underneath to add stiffness since I knew I didn't want a middle leg. Then the top sat in storage for 2 years after my divorce (didn't get to finish it before I got the boot). I met my (now) wife who was kind enough to give this nice corner of her basement and I finished it off. I built the legs out of 2x6s (2 per corner), with a 2x6 stub in the corners to support the bottom shelf, which is 3/4 plywood. I had to shim the front legs because the floor is so uneven (it kicks up quite a bit at the wall). Oh yeah, I forgot, I also trimmed out the top edge and added the back splash with some 1x ash a buddy had from one of his trees he had to cut down.

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/yjqfSCqSd0jFUjH3DoYZZw?authkey=oKti_nCT1MY&feat=directlink

(Apparently I can't post photo's yet?)

I also have this old metal office desk that will serve as a stand for either a mill or lathe. The desk was in the basement from the previous home owners, they must have had to take it apart to get it down there, it is very heavy. The top is kind of nasty, lots of spilled paint and it looks like a vise got ripped out of the thin metal in the corner. I am thinking I will build another top to lay over this one - for both rigidity and to clean the looks up. Its a huge mess right now, I am trying to figure out how to organize this space.

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/LKCYT-JpENRPjvzgsD1scQ?authkey=oKti_nCT1MY&feat=directlink

I think this is actually my first post. Been lurking for a while though.

Chris

Virgil Johnson
01-21-2009, 04:56 PM
http://www.woodcentral.com/shots/shot2.shtml

Its geared toward woodworking but holds steel parts too.

Timleech
01-21-2009, 05:06 PM
Mine used to be built from 2x4s with a 1/4" plate steel top and lots of diagonal bracing.
That had to go to make room for the mill, so now my bench is a 4'x2'6" surface table :)
The Vice is mounted on a safe, I couldnt bring myself to drill the surface table, even if it was cheap.

You can see the bench lurking in the background, its covered in stuff as Im in the process of moving all the equipment around (again...)
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn274/small_planes/SSC_3981.jpg

Dave

There's something a bit familiar about that surface table, racking my brains but just can't place what it is..........

Maybe it's just the junk on top of it that looks familiar :D :D

Tim

small.planes
01-21-2009, 05:14 PM
Nope, the junks all mine :p


Dave

Bill736
01-21-2009, 05:40 PM
I'm in the middle of a "four month" complete reorganization of my shop, which has now taken a year. In the process, a couple of new benches are being built. What caught my eye about Evan's benches was the dedicated bench for electrical work, a feature which I'm trying hard to incorporate into my shop. The electrical section should be away from the machines that produce sawdust, metal chips, and welding sparks. Oddly enough, that puts my electrical section onto one end of my 12 foot long 1870s handmade woodworking bench. Wooden pegs, I'd like you to meet oscilloscope !
Limited space makes for odd bedfellows.

davidh
01-21-2009, 05:56 PM
lets see some pictures of those old benches. . . .

even's shop is fantastic. . thats what a person that does not sleep can accomplish in a lifetime.




I'm in the middle of a "four month" complete reorganization of my shop, which has now taken a year. In the process, a couple of new benches are being built. What caught my eye about Evan's benches was the dedicated bench for electrical work, a feature which I'm trying hard to incorporate into my shop. The electrical section should be away from the machines that produce sawdust, metal chips, and welding sparks. Oddly enough, that puts my electrical section onto one end of my 12 foot long 1870s handmade woodworking bench. Wooden pegs, I'd like you to meet oscilloscope !
Limited space makes for odd bedfellows.

boslab
01-21-2009, 06:01 PM
i'm shure i have a bench, i did have one but i havent seen it for a long time, i might be in fact working on a giant pile of crap with a vise bolted on
mark

Andrew_D
01-21-2009, 06:21 PM
You would not believe the number of those I've seen go at auctions for $50, even $10 once. NOBODY wants to pay to move it!

What does it weigh? (In case I find one at an auction :D )
Or do I even want to know?

Andrew

strider
01-21-2009, 06:27 PM
You guys are unbelievable. How do you keep your shops so clean and organized? (Evan makes me sick:D ). If I had a clue as to which pile of crap, on which bench, was hiding my camera I'd take some pic's of my 'benches'. Of course I'd have to calculate a proper time to post as I wouldn't want you all spewing all of your dinner after looking at the pic's. Sheesh. Maybe I'll go look for it anyway because I need some help with a logo ID, then you'll be sorry you started this post.
Strider

rode2rouen
01-21-2009, 09:23 PM
This is my welding area. Bench is 30" X 72", 3/8" plate top, 1.5" square tube base. It was the first project when I got my first TIG machine.

http://i721.photobucket.com/albums/ww216/bjorn_toulouse/Vise%20Swap/weldbench.jpg


Rex

lane
01-21-2009, 09:26 PM
Here is mine 1/4 wall 3 inch square tubing with a 2ft x3ft 2inch thick blanchard ground plate on top. Weights about 1000 pounds had to put 500 lb rated casters on the bottom just so I could move it around.
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w277/lane5263/Shoplookingnortheast008.jpg

The gray thing in the middle with the arbor press on it.

gdavis2265
01-22-2009, 08:39 AM
Hi guys, this is my first post. I enjoy reading your forum. Thought I'd introduce myself. I'm from spokane.

Here is my welding table and a few of my toys.

http://inlinethumb44.webshots.com/32939/2992062140099097893S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2992062140099097893xBTUWk)

http://inlinethumb56.webshots.com/35447/2878806720099097893S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2878806720099097893KuIDCw)


http://inlinethumb49.webshots.com/42672/2064073230099097893S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2064073230099097893sALjQZ)

http://inlinethumb20.webshots.com/41683/2574345330099097893S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2574345330099097893QQDgYm)

old-biker-uk
01-22-2009, 01:42 PM
4" x 4" frame with 1.5" pine top, steel surface aound big(ger) vice. If I accumulate much more stuff I'll just have to move inside the house...
http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/remark/pages/workshop/images/wshop07.jpg
Mark