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madman
01-06-2009, 02:25 PM
I finally found a supplier Mcmaster Carr that would sell me 4 feet of 6 inch schedule 40 clear food grade PVC Pipe. NOW i call leave visa number and 4 hours later some guy calls and says we wont sell to you. I was told they ONLY sell to existing customers> OK thats that, No xmas card for them this year.

Jim Caudill
01-06-2009, 02:37 PM
If you think you will use them as a regular supplier, open a new account with them. If this is pretty much a "one time" deal, then get someone with an existing account to get it for you and just reimburse them.

I tried looking in your "public profile" for your location, but you don't seem to want to let much information about yourself be known. Someone like myself could order it for you and then forward it to you once received.

A lot of suppliers don't sell "over the counter", but only to those with accounts. Like I said, open an account if you are going to use them. I think it has to do with how taxes are collected and paid. The Local Grainger store used to say something like "wholesale only" or "no public sales". They kind of looked the other way for a while and guys would buy from them and pay cash, but say it was for the company they worked for. A few years ago, they tightened things up and now will only sell to those with an account number.

McNeillMachine
01-06-2009, 02:52 PM
I've never had a problem with them... all of the bearings and some of the raw stock I built my recent stirling engine with came from them. I order online, using a credit card, and it arrives the next day. Are you in canada? I have heard some members griping about not shipping to there.

Phil

radkins
01-06-2009, 02:57 PM
McMaster Carr?:confused: You have got to be kidding, I have used McMaster Carr for the last 26 years with no problems at all! The last thing I ordered was two bronze bearings that cost less than $15.00 and they shipped them right out. I know Grainger has this thing about being particular about who they sell to, which makes exactly ZERO sense, but I have never heard of anyone having a problem with McMaster Carr.

gellfex
01-06-2009, 03:05 PM
DO NOT!! They're gods!!! I would die without them!

Seriously, I remember the bad old day when I could spend a week trying to get things like stainless metric socket cap screws. Also, I'm in a messenger zone, and if I get an order in by 11 am, I get it that afternoon, often by 3 pm, at teh same price as UPS. How sweet is that!

I long ago learned to BS my way into "trade only" places. Lie boldly! I'm a 1 man shop but have had a M-C account for decades. Try opening an account online, and then use the credit card. I never use open account payment.

phatfred8
01-06-2009, 03:08 PM
I have a online account with them. Go to their website and set it up. Then they will take your order and not ask any questions. I have been doing it this way for years.

I think they are a great supplier.

Brian

Evan
01-06-2009, 03:19 PM
Mike is in Canada. They won't ship to Canada.

thistle
01-06-2009, 03:26 PM
they wont ship outside of the us, the reason being something pathetic like homeland security,

however it is easy to trick them by using a forwarding company, ie a US address, and they send it on.

Jim Caudill
01-06-2009, 03:26 PM
I had no way of knowing his name is "Mike" or that he lives in Canada. Too bad he's so reluctant to include anything in his profile.

lazlo
01-06-2009, 03:37 PM
they wont ship outside of the us, the reason being something pathetic like homeland security.

It's not a pathetic reason -- the Homeland Security Act now requires a ton of paperwork to ship stuff out of the country, and there are all kinds of legal liabilities if the recipient does something stupid with the stuff the vendor ships.

So a lot of American companies just don't want to deal with it...

"Thank you for your order. Unfortunately, due to the ever increasing complexity of United States export regulations, McMaster-Carr can only process orders from a few large, long-established customers in Canada.

We sincerely regret any inconvenience this causes you."

But hey, I sleep better at night knowing my children are safe because we won't ship food-grade PVC tubing to Canada, especially since the tubing probably came from China in the first place... :confused:

JCHannum
01-06-2009, 03:57 PM
They sell & ship such a large variety of products that with the export laws being what they are, it can well be a nightmare to keep up with what is considered a violation and what is not and who or what country is on the approval list to sell to. It is simpler to just cease export, which is what they have done, worldwide, not just to Canada.

They reported a violation themselves, paid a fine, and at about that time stopped their export operations.

Thruthefence
01-06-2009, 05:40 PM
If a lurker may comment, I had used them for years, under a business account, ( company I worked for had it ) and had super service. I could order a screw & washer, & get the same great service at the Hangar, as the plant got with huge orders.

Haven't had occasion to use them in years, but I opened a personal account last Friday, & ordered $15.00 worth of Bundy brake tubing, & got like, three emails confirming my order, shipping, thanks for using, ect.

My experience is probably small compared to some folks, but I don't remember them ever not having stock.

gellfex
01-06-2009, 06:30 PM
My experience is probably small compared to some folks, but I don't remember them ever not having stock.

If it's out of stock at the local warehouse, they ship from one of the other 4. Occasionally my stuff comes out of Chicago and takes an extra day. I also think there's certain obscure stuff that isn't stocked everywhere.

tony ennis
01-06-2009, 07:15 PM
I only ordered from them once, and had a perfect experience. Like $50 worth of bronze bearings and such. Easy Peasy. And their web s1te r0XoRZ MI boX0rz.

Wirecutter
01-06-2009, 07:51 PM
It's not a pathetic reason -- the Homeland Security Act now requires a ton of paperwork to ship stuff out of the country, and there are all kinds of legal liabilities if the recipient does something stupid with the stuff the vendor ships.

So a lot of American companies just don't want to deal with it...

"Thank you for your order. Unfortunately, due to the ever increasing complexity of United States export regulations, McMaster-Carr can only process orders from a few large, long-established customers in Canada.

We sincerely regret any inconvenience this causes you."

But hey, I sleep better at night knowing my children are safe because we won't ship food-grade PVC tubing to Canada, especially since the tubing probably came from China in the first place... :confused:
Interesting you should mention China. I was building a testset at work a couple of years (but not pre-911) ago. On the same day, I ordered some wall wart power supplies from Canada and some really obscure line cord parts (that are usually over-molded) from China. The parts from China took days to arrive, the Canadian stuff a couple of weeks - all with standard "when it gets here" shipping methods. Apparently, the pipe from China moves at a pretty brisk pace, but Homeland Security needs to keep a pretty tight lid on all those dangerous Canadians and their stuff. :D

-Mark

ammcoman2
01-06-2009, 08:26 PM
I live in Canada and purchased quite a bit from them and then one day "got the notice".

Funny that Enco, MSC, et al can still send stuff to me. I think one of the reasons was that they were taking the GST off at source which probably makes for a pile of paperwork. The others mentioned above don't, and I am charged either by UPS or by the Canadian post office (sometimes).

Similar experience at Acklands Grainger locally - won't sell to individuals. Reason: potential liability. How does KBC manage?

Grrrr.

Geoff

andy_b
01-06-2009, 08:44 PM
that's pretty funny how Homeland Security can keep a piece of food-grade PVC from slipping across the border, but not much else.

andy b.

Thruthefence
01-06-2009, 09:16 PM
who ever controls the McMaster-Carr warehouses after the apocalypse will control the world. Just think of the MadMax stuff you could put out.

lazlo
01-06-2009, 09:18 PM
who ever controls the McMaster-Carr warehouses after the apocalypse will control the world. Just think of the MadMax stuff you could put out.

LOL! Somehow I got this weird picture in my head of Mel Gibson with food-grade PVC tubing wrapped all over him for body-armor :)

jkilroy
01-06-2009, 09:37 PM
McMaster-Carr is the shiz! ;)

Teenage_Machinist
01-06-2009, 09:50 PM
McMasterCarr is t3h U83r 133754uc3!!!!11111!111111oneone


Leetspeak translation: McMaster Carr is the uber leetsauce!!!!!!

Evan
01-06-2009, 10:57 PM
We have been over this before. Canada is exempt from all export regulations in the US. There are no regulations to deal with when shipping to Canada unless it is firearms or radionuclides. Both countries prohibit the import and export of those items without serious paperwork and permits. For everything else there is a single form to fill out that takes about 2 or 3 minutes. That hasn't changed.

wierdscience
01-06-2009, 11:30 PM
I order from McMaster at least once a week,sometimes more.In several years now they have never screwed up an order and I nearly always get the stuff next day.

If I was running HLS I would not allow them to ship anything outside the US.

After all,if some lunatic overseas was building a nuke and needed a special part to make it work,chances are McMaster would have it in stock:D

lazlo
01-07-2009, 12:12 AM
We have been over this before. Canada is exempt from all export regulations in the US. There are no regulations to deal with when shipping to Canada unless it is firearms or radionuclides.

United States to Canada: Export Regulations and Data Requirements
http://www.csx.com/?fuseaction=customers.transcanada#ustocan

Under the new Department of Homeland Security regulations, the United States Principal Party of Interest (USPPI) ( the exporter) has three options to declare export shipments based on the goods to be reported.

1. Exports previously requiring a Shipper's Export Declaration must be done using the CBP Automated Export System (AES) or approved software that will interface with AES. This process will provide to the USPPI a unique internal transaction number (ITN) as proof of export declaration.
2. USPPI may apply for Option 4 - Post Departure Filing Privileges
3. Exports that are exempt from export declaration

Proof of Filing number

All rail bills of lading received for shipments from the United States to Canada must contain a proof of filing number or exemption statement. Rail carriers will not accept bills of lading without this required information.

Rail carrier responsibility and liability are limited to making sure the proof of filing number is provided and reflected on customs documentation. Rail carriers are not responsible or liable for validating the accuracy of the proof of filing numbers provided on rail bills of lading.

Under the new regulations, the USPPI must provide the proof of filing number assigned depending on the option used for Shipper's Export Declaration on the rail bill of lading. The following examples explain how the proof of filing number is conveyed electronically on rail bills of lading:

1. Automated Export System (AES) Internal Transaction Number (ITN)
This number, which is generated by the U.S. Census system, is assigned to a shipment confirming that the AES transmission was accepted and is on file in AES.

Transaction Prefix - 1 alpha, e.g. X
Numeric ID - 14 numeric digits, e.g. 20020424123456

The complete Internal Transaction Number for this example is: X20020424123456
EDI Example: N9*ITN*X20020424123456

2. Automated Export System Option 4 Employee Identification Number
This is a U.S. Census exemption statement containing the USPPI ID number. If a forwarding agent is filing for an Option 4-approved USPPI, both the USPPI and the forwarding agent ID numbers are required, and the USPPI ID must appear first. The USPPI ID consists of 9 digits followed by an optional 2-position alpha-numeric suffix.

Qualifying Prefix - 1 numeric; e.g. 4
USPPI ID number - 9 numeric, 2 alpha; e.g. 123456789AB
Number Separator - colon; e.g. :
Forwarding agent's ID number - 9 numeric; e.g. 741234567

The complete AES Option 4 Exemption Statement for the above example is: 4123456789AB:623156725
EDI Example: N9*PDF*4123456789AB:623156725

3. Automated Export System Export Information Code Exemption Number (Note 1)
This is a U.S. Census exemption statement containing the reference number in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), which allows the shipment to be exported without pre-filing identifiers. The exemptions are contained in 15 CFR Part 30, Subpart D, Sections 30.50 through 30.58 or other appropriate sections of 15 CFR Part 30, Subpart D. The exemption statement must completely identify the location of the exemption, e.g. "30.58 (a)" is reported as "3058A".

Qualifying Prefix - 5 alpha; e.g. NOEEI
U.S. Reference - 4 numeric; e.g. 30.36

EDI Example: N9*CEN*NOEEI 30.36


For assistance with billing U.S. to Canada shipments, call 1-877-ShipCSX (1-877-744-7279), option 2.

Ken_Shea
01-07-2009, 12:31 AM
Lazlo's quote is is exactly why I stopped exporting anything anywhere, it reads as gibberish and makes no sense except to export professionals.

quasi
01-07-2009, 12:34 AM
no wonder America is circling the bowl, you can't export anything without the central scrutinizers approval?

lazlo
01-07-2009, 12:37 AM
Most of the new export control bullsh!t, "Export Administration Regulations", surrounds "Trade Party Screening" -- the Homeland Security Act now makes it a legal requirement that the shipper insure that the buyer is not on the Individuals of Interest or Organizations of Interest lists at the Dept of Homeland Security, State Department, Department of Justice, DEA, ...

What's really amazing is that if you go to the Ebay seller discussion forums, Homeland Security is beginning to randomly hit individuals shipping stuff to Canada with the same bureaucratic nonsense:

"Trade Party Screening establishes whether a company or individual is present on any official denied party or transshipment list, banned from import or export transactions, sanctioned by a government for performing illegal acts or a forced child labor or convict labor violator."

Why does America have Export Control Laws?

Simply put, export controls implement U.S. national security and foreign policies, protect U.S. interests at home and abroad, and enforce other internationally mandated economic and trade sanctions.

These interests, covered in such laws as the Homeland Security Act and the USA Patrioit Act, include protection against the threat of terrorism, military action, and nuclear, chemical, and biological warfare, as well as disruptions due to the short supply of critical goods.

What about shipments to Canada?

Compliance with the EAR includes shipments to America's closest trading partner, Canada.

In addition, CFR 15 [Commerce and Foreign Trade] requires a Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) for shipments:

* Requiring a Department of Commerce License.
* Requiring a Department of State, Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, export license under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR, 22 CFR Parts 121-130).
* Subject to the ITAR but exempt from license requirements.
* Requiring a Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration, export declaration (21 CFR Part 1313).
* For storage in Canada but ultimately destined for third countries, the specific country of destination being unknown at the time of export to Canada.
* For all exports of items subject to the EAR (15 CFR Parts 730-799) that will be transshipped through Canada to a third destination, that would required an SED, AES record, or Commerce license if shipped directly to the final destination from the United Status (13 CFR §30.58).

andy_b
01-07-2009, 01:20 AM
i realize it is fun to make fun of all this bull, but as Lazlo posted, that is pretty much how it is. we actually had an entire department at work with the single job of making sense of all that crap. i almost got sucked into it at one time, but, as with most problems in large bureaucracies, if you ignore them long enough they will either go away or someone else will do it. :)

the worst part is, even if you change one thing like a letter in the text printed on a part, you have to go through the entire process again and you can't just say, "it's the same as the last one only with one letter different."

andy b.

barts
01-07-2009, 03:22 AM
Maybe as part of our new economic stimulus package we can relax some of the silliness that's getting in the way of US companies exporting products... I work in computer software, and the gyrations we go through to ship open-source cryptographic software (that's obtained from outside the US) back to the same countries we got the sources from.....

I'm all in favor of being careful w/ nuclear bomb triggers.... but plastic pipe?

- Bart

Evan
01-07-2009, 05:27 AM
If you read what Robert posted it applies only to rail shipments. The reason for that is that they are not examined at the border and may contain goods that are subject to trade agreements not covered by NAFTA, vehicles and lumber being two main items. It has actually become easier to ship to Canada in recent years as most courier services will pre clear the shipment for the shipper saving both the shipper and the receiver having to do any paper work.

My wife imports and exports machinery and machine shop supplies from/to the US daily and and there has been no change in regulations at that level.

thistle
01-07-2009, 08:39 AM
a SED is only needed for shipments with a value over
$2500

the old paper form only took a minute to do ,

i buy lots of stuff from the US

paper work is never a problem,

Mcgyver
01-07-2009, 09:12 AM
a counter point to the logistics challenges is digikey. I don't know of a company with more sku's yet every time I've ordered they manage to correct pick, ship, important and get to my doorstep the next day. As there is no one in Canada with the same extensive catalogue and internet ordering as MC, it would seem a unbelievable decision to just abandoned the market....its like saying California just isn't worth it; no company does that because its too big a market. Instead of retreating they could own Canada....and the logistics is a cop out.....digikey does it just fine.

The extent of this homeland stuff is surprising. There's an distinct economic cost to these bureaurcratic layers, not only do you have tax to pay for it all, it affects competitiveness...both of which are drags on economic activity. As we, western democracies, wrestle with how to compete globally, we need leaders who understand economics and who are focused on removing drag not increasing it.

Still....it surprising MC wouldn't see it as an opportunity rather than pack it in.

lazlo
01-07-2009, 01:12 PM
If you read what Robert posted it applies only to rail shipments.

Evan, the reason that first post talks about rail shipping is because it's from the CSX web page. :) They had the best summary of the new EAR (export restrictions) resulting from the Patriot Act.

The second post, which talks about how the Patriot Act EAR's apply to exports to Canada, is from the Department of Homeland Security.

Evan
01-07-2009, 01:19 PM
Regardless, there has been no change in the last decade in the paperwork required to import and export items such a babbit pots, specialized milling machines, palletloads of grinding wheels and related items. Also, the items I order from the US from time to time still have the same customs declaration on them as they have for years.

lazlo
01-07-2009, 01:26 PM
From the Canadian side yes, but there's a ton of new paperwork (EAR's) if you're shipping to Canada.

One of the biggest being that you have to file paperwork with the Department of Homeland Security for Trade Party Screening, to insure that the individual or organization you're shipping to is not on their Persons of Interest list.

Evan
01-07-2009, 02:01 PM
Nope, Canada is exempt.



TITLE 15 - COMMERCE AND FOREIGN TRADE

SUBTITLE B - REGULATIONS RELATING TO COMMERCE AND FOREIGN TRADE

CHAPTER I - BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

PART 30 - FOREIGN TRADE STATISTICS

subpart d - EXEMPTIONS FROM THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE FILING OF SHIPPER'S EXPORT DECLARATIONS

30.58 - Exemption for shipments from the United States to Canada.

(a) Except as noted in paragraph (c) of this section, shipments originating in the United States where the country of ultimate destination (see 30.7(i)) is Canada are exempt from the Shipper's Export Declaration requirements of this part. This exemption also applies to shipments from one point in the United States or Canada to another point thereof by routes passing through the other country.

(b) The Harbor Maintenance Fee applies to shipments by vessel exempt from Shipper's Export Declaration requirements by virtue of being destined to Canada.

(c) This exemption does not apply to the following shipments: (The Bureau of the Census also reserves the right to reinstate the Shipper's Export Declaration requirements of this part in specific instances for the purpose of ensuring statistical accuracy.) (1) Requiring a Department of Commerce license.

(2) Requiring a Department of State, Office of Defense Trade Controls, export license under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR22 CFR parts 121130).

(3) Subject to the ITAR but exempt from license requirements.

(4) Requiring a Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration, export declaration (21 CFR part 1313).

(5) For storage in Canada but ultimately destined for third countries, the specific country of destination being unknown at the time of export to Canada (see 30.39 for reporting requirements).

(6) Shipments of rough diamonds exported (reexported) to Canada for use or consumption in Canada.

(7) For all exports of items subject to the EAR (15 CFR Parts 730 through 799) that will be transhipped through Canada to a third destination, that would require an SED, AES record, or Commerce license if shipped directly to the final destination from the United States (see 30.55(h)(2), including exports of items subject to the EAR that will be transhipped through Canada to Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea, Serbia (excluding Kosovo), Sudan, and Syria.

[55 FR 49615, Nov. 30, 1990, as amended at 65 FR 42564, July 10, 2000; 68 FR 59879, Oct. 20, 2003]



15 CFR 30.58 - Exemption for shipments from the United States to Canada.
Code of Federal Regulations - Title 15: Commerce and Foreign Trade (December 2005)


http://vlex.com/vid/19633802

lazlo
01-07-2009, 02:18 PM
Evan, that's just saying you're exempt from the Export Declarations paperwork. You still have to file the Homeland Security Paperwork (the Trade Party Screening), plus all this sh!t:

What about shipments to Canada?

Compliance with the EAR includes shipments to America's closest trading partner, Canada.

In addition, CFR 15 [Commerce and Foreign Trade] requires a Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) for shipments:

* Requiring a Department of Commerce License.
* Requiring a Department of State, Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, export license under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR, 22 CFR Parts 121-130).
* Subject to the ITAR but exempt from license requirements.
* Requiring a Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration, export declaration (21 CFR Part 1313).
* For storage in Canada but ultimately destined for third countries, the specific country of destination being unknown at the time of export to Canada.
* For all exports of items subject to the EAR (15 CFR Parts 730-799) that will be transshipped through Canada to a third destination, that would required an SED, AES record, or Commerce license if shipped directly to the final destination from the United Status (13 CFR §30.58).

lazlo
01-07-2009, 02:32 PM
On a related note, some here (Dennis) may remember when this headline flamed-out on Slashdot a couple of years ago: Symantec will longer export encryption software to individuals in Canada, because of Homeland Security interference:

Schneier on Security
http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2005/12/are_computersec.html

December 28, 2005
Are Computer-Security Export Controls Back?

I thought U.S. export regulations were finally over and done with, at least for software. Maybe not:

Unfortunately, due to strict US Government export regulations Symantec is only able to fulfill new LC5 orders or offer technical support directly with end-users located in the United States and commercial entities in Canada, provided all screening is successful.

Commodities, technology or software is subject to U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security control if exported or electronically transferred outside of the USA. Commodities, technology or software are controlled under ECCN 5A002.c.1, cryptanalytic.

You can also access further information on our web site at the following address: http://www.symantec.com/region/reg_eu/techsupp/enterprise/index.html

Mac1
01-07-2009, 04:57 PM
some guy calls and says we wont sell to you. I was told they ONLY sell to existing customers> OK thats that, No xmas card for them this year.

I posted this thread several years ago concerning MMC and everyone on this board told me I was wrong and they are the greatest company on earth. I'm glad to hear someone else had a similar experience.

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=4456&highlight=Mac1

jkilroy
01-07-2009, 05:02 PM
The fact that McMaster-Carr won't sell to Canada is only bad for you guys in Canada. ;) They still rock south of the border. I guess people get all flamed up over this because they are a great company, with a great web site and impressive inventory. I'd be real pissed if they stopped selling in Mississippi thats for sure.

lazlo
01-07-2009, 06:48 PM
Just in case anybody gets all excited about all the good stuff at the MMC website and tries to place an order, they don't accept orders from individuals for WILL CALL (pick up).

Grainger does the same thing: they ask if you're an individual. If you say "yes" they won't sell to you. If you make up a bogus company name, they're more than happy to sell to you :) I think some of the MSDS items are regulated only for commercial establishments -- I was asked that by McMaster once about soda glass (or some other chemical) that I ordered.

Not to rub it in the noses of the Canadians, but McMaster really is superb. Their prices are retail (i.e., higher than MSC), but they have everything, their shipping is incredibly cheap, and they ship before you even place the order :D

MSC is very obviously trying to match McMaster, and MSC's shipping really is pretty darn fast now (a lot of times I'm getting packages from the MSC Atlanta warehouse the next day), but there are enough glitches with MSC orders that they still have some catching-up to do.

I order a pair of Gibraltar thumb screws from MSC two weeks ago. In the paper and online catalog, it clearly states that the price ($5) was for quantity 2. I received one. When I called, MSC customer service just flatly told me both their online and paper catalogs were wrong -- that was the price each.

When I asked to order a second thumbscrew (I needed two for the Wilton bandsaw I just rebuilt), the Customer Service lady realized it was pretty crappy for me to have to pay $10 UPS shipping for a mistake in MSC's catalog, so she shipped me the second thumbscrew gratis.

So thumbs down for the mistake in the catalog(s), but thumbs-up for eventually doing the right thing. McMaster would have sent me two thumbscrews in the first place, if that's what their catalog said...

Evan
01-07-2009, 07:09 PM
Evan, that's just saying you're exempt from the Export Declarations paperwork. You still have to file the Homeland Security Paperwork (the Trade Party Screening), plus all this sh!t:

What about shipments to Canada?

Compliance with the EAR includes shipments to America's closest trading partner, Canada.

In addition, CFR 15 [Commerce and Foreign Trade] requires a Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) for shipments:

* Requiring a Department of Commerce License.
* Requiring a Department of State, Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, export license under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR, 22 CFR Parts 121-130).
* Subject to the ITAR but exempt from license requirements.
* Requiring a Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration, export declaration (21 CFR Part 1313).
* For storage in Canada but ultimately destined for third countries, the specific country of destination being unknown at the time of export to Canada.
* For all exports of items subject to the EAR (15 CFR Parts 730-799) that will be transshipped through Canada to a third destination, that would required an SED, AES record, or Commerce license if shipped directly to the final destination from the United Status (13 CFR §30.58).



That is the same thing I posted. None of that applies if the shipment is destined for Canada to stay in Canada unless you are shipping diamonds, weapons, nuclear material or restricted drugs.

EAR stands for "Commerce Export Administration Regulations" and has nothing to do with homeland security.

lazlo
01-07-2009, 07:17 PM
EAR stands for "Commerce Export Administration Regulations" and has nothing to do with homeland security.

This is from the Homeland Security Web page Evan. The new Patriot Act EAR's require that the shipper file paperwork with the Department of Homeland Security to insure that the Candian recipent is not on the "Persons or Organizations of Interest" lists. Do you really think that McMaster, Symantec, and other US companies just decided to stop exporting to Canada at the same time just because they don't need the business? :)

What about shipments to Canada?

Compliance with the EAR includes shipments to America's closest trading partner, Canada.

In addition, CFR 15 [Commerce and Foreign Trade] requires a Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) for shipments:

* Requiring a Department of Commerce License.
* Requiring a Department of State, Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, export license under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR, 22 CFR Parts 121-130).
* Subject to the ITAR but exempt from license requirements.
* Requiring a Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration, export declaration (21 CFR Part 1313).
* For storage in Canada but ultimately destined for third countries, the specific country of destination being unknown at the time of export to Canada.
* For all exports of items subject to the EAR (15 CFR Parts 730-799) that will be transshipped through Canada to a third destination, that would required an SED, AES record, or Commerce license if shipped directly to the final destination from the United Status (13 CFR §30.58).

davidh
01-07-2009, 08:00 PM
does this apply to friends or relatives just sending stuff to friends or relatives.??????

i have not needed to ship to Thunderbay for quite a while but is it now that difficult ?

Evan
01-07-2009, 08:28 PM
Robert,

Complying with the EAR means you don't have to file. That is what the Commerce EAR says.

lazlo
01-07-2009, 08:42 PM
This was an example of the post 9/11 paperwork you have to go through -- it's basically the same EAR's I copied from the Homeland Security web page. Note the new legal liability of the shipper for the end user.

From a discussion on PracticalMachinist about McMaster back in 2007

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/showthread.php?p=663288#post663288


What a mess. Out of interest about my favorite industrial supplier [McMaster], I looked up some US export law.(here) This is what you're responsible for doing EACH time you export something:

Summary of Steps to Take to Process Your Export:


Ensure that your export is under U.S. Department of Commerce jurisdiction.

Classify your item by reviewing the Commerce Control List.

If your item is classified by an Export Control Classification Number (ECCN), identify the Reasons for Control on the Commerce Control List.

Cross-reference the ECCN Controls against the Commerce Country Chart to see if a license is required. If yes, determine if a License Exception is available before applying for a license.

Ensure that no proscribed end-users or end-uses are involved with your export transaction. If proscribed end-users or end-uses are involved, determine if you can proceed with the transaction or must apply for a license.

Export your item using the correct ECCN and the appropriate symbol (e.g., NLR, license exception, or license number and expiration date) on your export documentation (e.g., Shipper’s Export Declaration).

Note that YOU are responsible for finding out how your foreign buyer intends to use each item.

Title of this thread should read "I have no use for idiotic laws."

He's quoting from the US Department of Commerce here (http://www.bis.doc.gov/licensing/exportingbasics.htm). Here's the bullsh!t about the shipper having to screen the recipient for being on the Denied Persons list.

Introduction to Commerce Department Export Controls
...

Who will receive your item?

Certain individuals and organizations are prohibited from receiving U.S. exports and others may only receive goods if they have been licensed, even items that do not normally require a license based on the ECCN and Commerce Country Chart or based on an EAR99 designation. You must be aware of the following lists:

Entity List - EAR Part 744, Supplement 4 - A list of organizations identified by BIS as engaging in activities related to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Depending on your item, you may be required to obtain a license to export to an organization on the Entity List even if one is not otherwise required.

Treasury Department Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List - EAR Part 764, Supplement 3 - A list maintained by the Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control comprising individuals and organizations deemed to represent restricted countries or known to be involved in terrorism and narcotics trafficking.

The Unverified List is composed of firms for which BIS was unable to complete an end-use check. Firms on the unverified list present a “red flag” that exporters have a duty to inquire about before making an export to them.

Note! Denied Persons - You may not participate in an export or reexport transaction subject to the EAR with a person whose export privileges have been denied by the BIS. A list of those firms and individuals whose export privileges have been denied is available on this Web site. Note that some denied persons are located within the United States. If you believe a person whose export privileges have been denied wants to buy your product in order to export it, you must not make the sale and should report the situation to BIS’s Office of Export Enforcement. If you have questions about Denied Persons, you may contact BIS’s Office of Enforcement Analysis at (202) 482-4255.

Liger Zero
01-07-2009, 08:44 PM
So how does one find out if one is on this list?

lazlo
01-07-2009, 08:47 PM
So how does one find out if one is on this list?

I was wondering about that too -- there were all sorts of stupid errors in the secret Homeland Security "No Fly" list -- Senator Ted Kennedy was on it at one point :)

So how do you know if you're wrongly on the secret "Denied Persons" list? According to the way the "Trade Party Screening" works -- you send paperwork to Homeland Security, Department of Commerce, DoD, DEA, and if no one responds, you're OK to ship.

JCHannum
01-07-2009, 09:37 PM
When you consider that a seller must go through that exercise for each individual item on a purchase, it is easy to understand why McM chooses not to export on a random basis. I would not infrequently authorize orders of two or more pages, single spaced, for routine nuts & bolts items. This is a large part of their business, and I doubt it has a high enough profit margin to warrant the additional time required to process.

dan s
01-07-2009, 10:00 PM
I was wondering about that too -- there were all sorts of stupid errors in the secret Homeland Security "No Fly" list -- Senator Ted Kennedy was on it at one point :)


Must fight the urge to comment must fight..... :D

Evan
01-08-2009, 12:51 AM
When you consider that a seller must go through that exercise for each individual item on a purchase, it is easy to understand why McM chooses not to export on a random basis. I would not infrequently authorize orders of two or more pages, single spaced, for routine nuts & bolts items. This is a large part of their business, and I doubt it has a high enough profit margin to warrant the additional time required to process.


Hardly likely. Only a very few specific items as mentioned in the EAR are restricted, not all possible items. Even homeland security doesn't care about an order of nuts and bolts sent to Canada.

Even more far fetched is the idea that they would have to examine an order for 1/4-20 cap screws and find that it was allowed but then do the same again for the next line item of 5/16 cap screws.

If any of this were true there would be no trade with Canada. My wife deals directly with the US shipping departments to arrange shipping and clearance of items she brokers or sells. When she must return a product she must fill out the same form for US customs that the shipper does. She knows the process and it doesn't include any of the claimed tedious complications listed above.

madman
01-14-2009, 04:54 PM
Did I open up a can of CRAP lol Anyhow i just wanted to say Mcmaster Carr Sucks thanx Mike in Ontario Canada

Ken_Shea
01-14-2009, 07:48 PM
Well with the business McMaster Carr has and they suck, I know I have at least one pending customer that will say On Target Sports sucks, so maybe business will pick up now :D

,

bob_s
01-14-2009, 08:17 PM
"If McMaster Carr is used as a model for business, how is the US economy going to recover?"

dave5605
01-15-2009, 12:21 PM
Go look in the back of a Fastenal catalog at the things that are restricted and can't be shipped to Canada if you want to see something weird. Endmills, drills, taps, wrenches and a whole host of greases, adhesives, etc.

In many cases on the drills, taps they have almost the same part number as a substitute item except with the letters CN after the US part#.

I'll bet its some kind of restriction the Canadian government put on the items. Maybe the country of origin of the items is someone Canada doesn't want to import things from.

Don't be so quick to blame the US for the restrictions you see.

Black_Moons
08-23-2009, 03:03 AM
Intresting, I Found a refrence to the mcmaster case; http://efoia.bis.doc.gov/antiboycott/violations/a659.pdf

Also about restricted parts to one country with a sub in another

I know busybee and grizzly often carry the near exact (or exact) same machines, but they have signed a non competion agreement.
busybee won't export to USA, grizzly won't export to canada.

Maybe Fastenal has parts from similarly 'non' competing companys and is trying to honor those agreements?

I highly doubt such silly export restrictions are the result of some goverment export restriction on endmills of a perticular type/size/shape/grind or company.

J Tiers
08-23-2009, 03:13 AM
Osama bin ladin was a genius......

He said "The americans will create their own hell.".

Welcome to hell.

OldRedFord
02-16-2010, 04:07 PM
Well I just opened a account with them. Hopefully they dont mind that I "work from home" :eek:

SpyGuy
02-16-2010, 05:40 PM
LOL! Somehow I got this weird picture in my head of Mel Gibson with food-grade PVC tubing wrapped all over him for body-armor :)

Wierd indeed! All my fantasies are of WOMEN! :D

Duffy
02-16-2010, 06:18 PM
Madman-THINK A BIT! If you want plastic , buy from a plastics supplier-not a hardware store! You dont live at the end of the world. Try Fabco Plastics, Cadillac Plastics, hell even try Canus Plastics in Ottawa-they might ship it to you. Lots of people in the Frozen North actually process foods and PROBABLY use food-grade plastic.

Kibby
02-16-2010, 07:27 PM
McMaster Carr is the finest MRO and supply company I have ever used. They are certainly not the cheapest, but they are hands-down the best at what they do. I have spent literally hundreds of thousands of my previous employers money at McMaster, and never once have they sent me something I didnt ask for, or got the order wrong somehow. Not once.

DougA
02-16-2010, 07:46 PM
They sell & ship such a large variety of products that with the export laws being what they are, it can well be a nightmare to keep up with what is considered a violation and what is not and who or what country is on the approval list to sell to. It is simpler to just cease export, which is what they have done, worldwide, not just to Canada.

They reported a violation themselves, paid a fine, and at about that time stopped their export operations.

If it was due to complexity then wouldn't it be just as difficult to ship to an older established company in Canada then someone who wants to set up a new account.

gnm109
02-16-2010, 08:09 PM
Just another kudo for McMaster-Carr. I needed three new handwheels for my new to me Webb Mill and they were the only company with any selection. I ordered them and they arrived in two days. I've used them several times in the past year with the same good results.

They aren't inexpensive but they have an incredible stock and when I really need a specific item, they will be my first choice.

I guess the dfficulties have to do with shipments to Canada. I'm sorry to hear this but many things have changed since 2001.

JCHannum
02-16-2010, 08:48 PM
If it was due to complexity then wouldn't it be just as difficult to ship to an older established company in Canada then someone who wants to set up a new account.

If they limit to established accounts, they have a finite number of accounts to deal with. Attrition will eventually eliminate those.

SpyGuy
02-16-2010, 11:22 PM
that's pretty funny how Homeland Security can keep a piece of food-grade PVC from slipping across the border, but not much else.

Agreed, the borders are too porous. And the biggest threat crossing our borders are PEOPLE, not things. Just like the myth of gun control, what we really need is terrorist control and criminal control.

That said, a lot of seemingly "innocent" stuff can be weaponized. I don't blame McMaster-Carr. I don't even blame the federal government (securing our borders and regulating international commerce are actually two of the VERY FEW things the federal government are tasked to do by our Constitution, with virtually everything else being unconstitutional and, thus, illegal).

If you want to get mad at someone, get mad at the global Islamic terrorists who account for 90+% of all military and paramilitary violence in the world.

nheng
02-17-2010, 12:05 AM
Agreed, the borders are too porous. And the biggest threat crossing our borders are PEOPLE, not things. Just like the myth of gun control, what we really need is terrorist control and criminal control.

That said, a lot of seemingly "innocent" stuff can be weaponized. I don't blame McMaster-Carr. I don't even blame the federal government (securing our borders and regulating international commerce are actually two of the VERY FEW things the federal government are tasked to do by our Constitution, with virtually everything else being unconstitutional and, thus, illegal).

If you want to get mad at someone, get mad at the global Islamic terrorists who account for 90+% of all military and paramilitary violence in the world.

No, we also reserve the right to get mad at ridiculous laws created and passed by idiots. Today, Conoco, BP and Caterpillar pulled their support out for the climate nonsense. Perhaps there is still hope for common sense to reign again.

And while we're at it, we need to get back our "checks" and "balances". Everything is now shoved down our collective throats with very little opposition.

SpyGuy
02-17-2010, 12:38 AM
No, we also reserve the right to get mad at ridiculous laws created and passed by idiots.

While I don't disagree with you, I doubt the laws have outlawed the export of food-grade plastic tubing. I suspect the problem is that there are so many other industrial components (many of which may be valid for restriction) on the list that McMaster-Carr just threw up their hands and said, "We can't afford to sort all this out and deal with the red tape."

Anyway, from your post I suspect that you and I would tend to agree on more things than not with regards to government, people, and politics.

HSS
02-17-2010, 01:06 AM
So how does one find out if one is on this list?

Uh-oh Liger, I just looked and you're on the list.:eek:

CCWKen
02-17-2010, 01:51 AM
I just bought one-pound of a rare chemical from Canada. It must be rare--US companies want five times the price for a lower grade. It was triple bagged and shipped via UPS in a large envelope. The shipping charge was on par and there was no fees or duties to pay. I received it in the normal UPS delivery time. I don't understand why material can flow so easily FROM Canada but to ship material TO Canada requires a full body scan and orifice probe on this end. I always get the eye when I ship small packages to Canada. Why, I don't know but the clerk always helps me fill out the form.

Kibby
02-17-2010, 06:35 AM
Just another kudo for McMaster-Carr. I needed three new handwheels for my new to me Webb Mill and they were the only company with any selection. I ordered them and they arrived in two days. I've used them several times in the past year with the same good results.

They aren't inexpensive but they have an incredible stock and when I really need a specific item, they will be my first choice.


Another good reason McMaster is so good. They have stuff you won't easily find anywhere else!

Carm
02-17-2010, 07:13 AM
Osama bin ladin was a genius......

He said "The americans will create their own hell.".

Welcome to hell.


How true. How sad.

gnm109
02-17-2010, 12:39 PM
Osama bin ladin was a genius......

He said "The americans will create their own hell.".

Welcome to hell.

Yes, and this comes from a man who wears filthy clothes, smells like a goat and lives in a cave. That's quite an insight. I guess hell is a relative term.

.

Mcgyver
02-17-2010, 01:32 PM
Yes, and this comes from a man who wears filthy clothes, smells like a goat and lives in a cave. .

Who? Jerry? I don't believe it


:D

gnm109
02-17-2010, 01:56 PM
Who? Jerry? I don't believe it


:D


LOL. I don't know Jerry but I've seen Obama...I mean Osama Bin Laden. (sorry) :)

EddyCurr
02-17-2010, 03:33 PM
Canadians, what about Spaenaur? (http://www.spaenaur.com/)

While I do not immediately see 6" Food Grade tubing as sought by the
OP, Spaenaur has many other interesting items useful to the HSM market.

What's more, they happen to be based in Kitchener, On. and have long
followed the practice of catalog sales to customers across the country.


"Mr. Spaetzel traveled across Canada by train, stopping at all of
the towns and cities securing sales orders. It didn’t take him long
to realize the vastness of the country would keep him on the road
all year round and he still wouldn’t reach all of Spaenaur’s customers.
Spaenaur needed a new strategy to reach its customers. As a result
Spaenaur developed its first 66 page catalog in 1938, which was
distributed to automotive maintenance customers across Canada.
The catalog was an instant success. It offered customers the flexibility
to source and purchase products whenever desired."

.

DougA
02-17-2010, 03:56 PM
[QUOTE=EddyCurr]Canadians, what about Spaenaur? (http://www.spaenaur.com/)

While I do not immediately see 6" Food Grade tubing as sought by the
OP, Spaenaur has many other interesting items useful to the HSM market.

What's more, they happen to be based in Kitchener, On. and have long
followed the practice of catalog sales to customers across the country.

Spaenaur is great for fasteners but McMaster has so much more. I just recently ordered through Canadian Bearings a 6 foot long rack and matching gear from McMaster. Price was cheap compared to having something made.

EddyCurr
02-17-2010, 04:11 PM
Spaenaur is great for fasteners but McMaster has so much more.No question that McMaster is a treasure trove.

But to give credit where due, Spaenaur has more than just fasteners.
One needs to get their physical catalog for best results, Spaenaur's
on-line catalog simply doesn't display product as successfully as some
other vendors.

.

form_change
02-17-2010, 04:44 PM
I join others in throwing my support behind McMaster. They are willing to ship to Australia, although as I've been buying from them for some time I could come under the existing customer rule I guess.
Recently I found something that they wouldn't ship due to US regulations. I had some screws to do up on a job that were awkward to get to and wondered if anyone made a replacable tip screwdriver with a universal joint. Looking in the McMaster catalogue, of course someone did so I ordered one. I then got an email asking me to remove it from the order as it contained a 'hazardous substance'. I removed it but sent an email asking what the hazardous substance was (thinking that it's a screwdriver - the most hazardous bit is the person holding it). The answer came back that it had a magnet in it and so transport regulations meant that it couldn't be air freighted. Sounds a little screwed up to me...

Michael

EddyCurr
02-17-2010, 05:57 PM
Some neodymium magnets are powerful enough to prevent an
aircraft's (non-ferrous) landing gear from properly extending.

.

Carm
02-18-2010, 07:45 AM
Yes, and this comes from a man who wears filthy clothes, smells like a goat and lives in a cave. That's quite an insight. I guess hell is a relative term.

.

IMO, everything is relative. But as reference, international flights in the 1960s took maybe 15 minutes to go through customs.
Domestic U.S. flight groundtime is now extended several hours and my nonagenarian blue eyed mother gets searched. The enactment cost of all this security is staggering.
None of which prevents you from being seated next to someone with explosive underwear.

bin Laden chose his lifestyle.

gnm109
02-18-2010, 01:33 PM
I need some 17 ga. (.058 ID) 304 stainless steel tubing to make a steam probe for a steam unit that I will use for doing guitar neck resets on guitars that were assembled with hot hide glue.

Local hobby shops have 1/6" (.0625) but only in brass. There were several sources that I found n the internet but all of them, except McMaster-Carr, wanted to sell me large quantities and I would have to send them an RFQ which I presume would require a large puchase at a great expenditure.

I got on line yesterday and ordered a 36" section of tubing, which is approximately 6 times what I need and will probably be a lifetime supply. I checked this morning and it will be here at my door tomorrow afternoon.

They also had 100 or more other sizes in both 304 and 316 SS. What's not to like about that?

fireguy
03-12-2010, 12:20 PM
Im in the great white north

I use a company called CBI USA

they are a receiving company/warehouse where you can ship products to and then pick up. They are located in Niagara Falls NY, so its helpful if you live somewhat in the area. Lots of Ontario Plates are seen there.

KJ

fireguy
03-12-2010, 12:24 PM
they wont ship outside of the us, the reason being something pathetic like homeland security,

however it is easy to trick them by using a forwarding company, ie a US address, and they send it on.


I use a company called CBI USA in Niagara Falls NY

So it helps if you live in the area. Im down about once a month picking up items. I have a couple friends who ship to my account and then I pick up for them.

Their prices are very reasonable.

Sorry for the double posting , forgot to get the reference quote the first time.

KJ

elderlyiron
03-12-2010, 12:38 PM
I have personally lived and died by McMaster Carr for over 25 years and I have had nothing but great service, fast shipping and professional dealings with them. I order anytime before 7:00pm and even though I'm 3 states away, I get delivery the next day by UPS ground always so I've never had to use express shipping. I can always depend on it. 100's of orders and they've never shorted me once or made a mistake on an order that was their mistake, but I've made plenty of boo boos in that same time. I'm disappointed by title of this thread since it diminishes a really well run company so I'm hoping at least to convey my personal experience so that any bad ones can be blanaced. Henry

madman
03-12-2010, 12:47 PM
I will try explaining The Title. i had a Job to do for a firm, I required a piece of tube, (Clear PVC Large Dia.) i call Mcmaster carr and great yes will ship it I give thanx Visa number and off to next thing to do. I had been making my living machining from my home shop and getting supplies can make or break you. Hours later i get a call from Them,,sorry wont send it ect. I was ticked off. Anyhow I did get over it . I just dont like these companies taking my order over the phone telling me its being shipped, give muy visa number then nothing happens. I DID get it from them later on bye a fellow i knew at a local bearing supply houise. Hopem this is a little clarification for you why i named my Posrt that way. Never meant to piss anyone off, but if i did dont worry you wont be the first one.

Gtroms
03-14-2010, 10:01 PM
I have done business with McMaster - Carr for years and had always been impressed with their service and their willingness and ability to answer questions. Last week. I had a bad experience with them. I wanted to purchase some carbide turning inserts.
I e-mailed asking what type of chip breaker the insert had and received the response, "All of the inserts we have available are found on our website". I thought this was strange because in the past they were extremely helpful. They have even sent me their suppliers spec sheet or would call with the information I had requested.
I responded to the e-mail asking the question again and received the following response, "All available information is listed on our website". "We are unable to provide any further information for these items".
Theresa
I responded, You are either not qualified or do not want to take the time to do the research to answer my question. In the past I have requested information and and the person answering has taken the time to send me your suppliers spec sheet.
I still have not received any information on the inserts.
In the mean time I looked at other sources and found what I needed at The Carbide Depot for less money.
McMaster is no longer the first place I go when looking to purchase. I will only use them as a last resort.
Strange how one bad employee can cast such a bad light on a company.

J Tiers
03-14-2010, 10:36 PM
Who? Jerry? I don't believe it


I clearly don't smell like a goat, they run from me....... I assume its on account of the smell NOT being like a goat, because it's known as a fact that goats don't respond at all to "ugly", they don't understand it. So it ain't on account of ugly, must be the smell.

Or maybe it's the goatskin tents..... The city inspector has been giving me trouble about them, and now even the goats don't like them. Well, I can forgive the goats being shy of someone who lives inside of uncle Pete and cousin Myrtle, but those city inspectors are a pain.....

Do you think that if I invite the inspectors to a feast and offer them only the very best of the sheep's eyes and diced gall bladders that they will stop bugging me?

macduff
06-08-2010, 01:13 PM
New to the forum. Found it while googling McMaster Carr and saw a result for McMaster Sucks.

Clicked on it and here I am. I was given MMC's name as a supplier for some specialty gear. When I saw the "sucks " post I was disappointed that they do not deliver to Canada.

I email the company and asked if they delivered to Nova Scotia, Canada.

Their answer was that they do deliver to Nova Scotia, which to the best of my knowledge is still in Canada.

When I filled out on their web page I clearly filled in Canada for the country. Good enough for me. Actually, the fellow who I got the name from has bought gear from MMC in the past, without any problems.

PeteF
06-08-2010, 11:24 PM
I join others in throwing my support behind McMaster. They are willing to ship to Australia, although as I've been buying from them for some time I could come under the existing customer rule I guess.
Recently I found something that they wouldn't ship due to US regulations. I had some screws to do up on a job that were awkward to get to and wondered if anyone made a replacable tip screwdriver with a universal joint. Looking in the McMaster catalogue, of course someone did so I ordered one. I then got an email asking me to remove it from the order as it contained a 'hazardous substance'. I removed it but sent an email asking what the hazardous substance was (thinking that it's a screwdriver - the most hazardous bit is the person holding it). The answer came back that it had a magnet in it and so transport regulations meant that it couldn't be air freighted. Sounds a little screwed up to me...

Michael

Have you purchased from them lately? If so, yes I'd suggest it's because you're an existing customer. My understanding is they won't send to Oz anymore (for new accounts). This homeland security business is just a lame excuse, what difference would it make if someone has been buying for years or not? I could have set up an account years ago to buy a handful of nuts and that would then make me ok to send to forever after? I buy quite a bit from US companies and all are more than happy to send it, no homeland security pathetic excuses, and generally quite fast. The fact is MMC does have items subject to export restriction and so it's just easier for them to make a blanket statement about all exports to all countries. An interesting business model, clearly times are good there :rolleyes:

Pete

oldtiffie
06-09-2010, 01:06 AM
Originally Posted by form_change
I join others in throwing my support behind McMaster. They are willing to ship to Australia, although as I've been buying from them for some time I could come under the existing customer rule I guess.
Recently I found something that they wouldn't ship due to US regulations. I had some screws to do up on a job that were awkward to get to and wondered if anyone made a replacable tip screwdriver with a universal joint. Looking in the McMaster catalogue, of course someone did so I ordered one. I then got an email asking me to remove it from the order as it contained a 'hazardous substance'. I removed it but sent an email asking what the hazardous substance was (thinking that it's a screwdriver - the most hazardous bit is the person holding it). The answer came back that it had a magnet in it and so transport regulations meant that it couldn't be air freighted. Sounds a little screwed up to me...

Michael


Have you purchased from them lately? If so, yes I'd suggest it's because you're an existing customer. My understanding is they won't send to Oz anymore (for new accounts). This homeland security business is just a lame excuse, what difference would it make if someone has been buying for years or not? I could have set up an account years ago to buy a handful of nuts and that would then make me ok to send to forever after? I buy quite a bit from US companies and all are more than happy to send it, no homeland security pathetic excuses, and generally quite fast. The fact is MMC does have items subject to export restriction and so it's just easier for them to make a blanket statement about all exports to all countries. An interesting business model, clearly times are good there :rolleyes:

Pete

Michael.

I had an email from McM-C (USA) and another from BusyBee (Canada) declining my orders on what would have been new accounts - perhaps a year or so ago - for shipping to OZ.

I have had no similar problems with most other suppliers in the USA, Canada, UK and Europe.

The worst most recent one was when I went to the "Starrett" OZ web site for some literature but got automatically flick-passed to the USA site which not only required me to register but to include a USA state and post-code - which I could not do and so it fell in a heap. I was going to email or phone Starrett OZ but it was more trouble than it was worth so I forgot it and moved on.

PeteF
06-09-2010, 01:20 AM
I was going to email or phone Starrett OZ but it was more trouble than it was worth so I forgot it and moved on.

... no surprise people are buying Mitutoyo instead :D

lost_cause
06-09-2010, 09:24 PM
food grade pvc tubing to canada? clearly there was a maple syrup crime in the making. thousands of lives were probably saved.