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View Full Version : The little Barker mill is resurrected from the ravages of hurricane Katrina



Bill Pace
01-06-2009, 07:23 PM
I finished resurrecting the little Barker mill from the ravages of Katrina this afternoon, and I must say I am Very pleased with the results, this little guy is just too cute and sooo well made. Even the little vice is quite well made!

But now ---- what the heck can I do with it?? Someone on the other thread mentioned notching pipe, and indeed that is a good suggestion (course I dont ever notch pipe!) Any other suggestions ... with those handles to get motion, it would be difficult to get any kind of fine movement. This thing was built to set it up, lock it down and bore, slice, notch, etc those 2-3-4000 gizmos one after another.

Any other ideas?

http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b301/pace1980/Barkermill4.jpghttp://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b301/pace1980/Barkerbearings005.jpghttp://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b301/pace1980/Barkerbearings003.jpg

For a follow-up on the unusual spindle/bearing set-up, I did re-install the original bearings and they are running very smoothly and quiet just bench running, I think they will be good to go.

On putting the spindle back together, I got a clearer picture of the set-up. That groove in the left side was for a big circlip which was a "stop" for the double row bearing to butt against as the nut was tightened, ... but, -- the nut was restrained from putting any load on either bearing by a 'pipe' spacer running down the center of the bore! and when the bearings, etc was in their proper position the nut would 'bottom' out. So, Im still a bit puzzled as to why it is set up that way.

http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b301/pace1980/Barkerbearings002.jpg

speedy
01-06-2009, 07:27 PM
Anyone know where I can pick up a widescreen monitor:D ??

Nice wee machine Bill.

lane
01-06-2009, 07:28 PM
Well like I said I guess now is a good time for me to teach you how to cut acme threads. And lets put some handles on it and make some dials. Hay Bill Look at both pictures did you put a part in up side down. The handle that raises the head up and down.

Rustybolt
01-06-2009, 07:34 PM
They're really a production mill. The one an HSM might want is the overarm model with dials on each axis. Those are a bit pricey.

Doc Nickel
01-06-2009, 07:48 PM
Cute little thing. I'd never even heard of the moveable head concept 'til I got my Nichols, and all of a sudden, I'm seeing it on all sorts of machines. Seems it was a pretty common setup in the old pre-CNC days. :D

For those watching at home, note how the motor is balanced opposite the head, with the pivot able to move sideways slightly. This makes it easier to raise and lower the head (less apparent weight) and lets the pivot allow the head to move straight vertically.

The Nichols uses essentially the same thing, and I've seen the same concept used in several other machines of a similar vintage.

Now, for uses... Well, most of them are, of course, production settings. Tool it up and cut a bunch of pieces. But, one use for which you might keep the tools on hand, is a small chop saw. Keep an arbor/toolholder with a thin sawblade around, and when you need to part something, cut a few sections of short stock, or shorten something up, just plunk it in and saw it off.

A small block/holder/tool for chopping small screws to length is always handy.

Then again, if you ever decide you don't have the room for it, I'll be happy to store it for you. :D I have lots of little semiproduction jobs I could use it for. (Slotting, drilling, notching, etc.)

Doc.

Doozer
01-06-2009, 07:52 PM
Sweet mill. Someone who does handrail or roll cages would LOVE that thing. Small enough to bring into the living room. (I am still single).

--Doozer

Bill Pace
01-06-2009, 08:26 PM
Hay Bill Look at both pictures did you put a part in up side down. The handle that raises the head up and down.
Dang!, leave it to "ole eagle eye Sisson" to spot that handle!!:(
And I fiddled with that thing in both positions --- shuda went and looked at my own pics -- But, is DOES work very well there...



A small block/holder/tool for chopping small screws to length is always handy. Doc, you just may have something there, Im always cutting a screw for something or other and have rigged up 3-4 different jigs trying to get a good way ... maybe this'll do.

lazlo
01-06-2009, 08:28 PM
That really is a neat little mill. Someone else posted a Barker here (or maybe PM) a couple of years back.

Looks like it's begging for a CNC retrofit: pair of ballscrews and a couple of steppers, and you've got a great benchtop CNC machine :D

By the way Bill, the paint looks great -- is that a rattle can?

J Tiers
01-06-2009, 08:51 PM
but, -- the nut was restrained from putting any load on either bearing by a 'pipe' spacer running down the center of the bore! and when the bearings, etc was in their proper position the nut would 'bottom' out. So, Im still a bit puzzled as to why it is set up that way.

You said it earlier.... its a double-row A/C bearing, and is likely internally preloaded, so it wouldn't need any more.

That's why I was less than hopeful about replacing it....I wasn't being prissy, I've already lived that hassle.

AlleyCat
01-06-2009, 10:41 PM
Bill- The longer you have that mill the more you will use it. I bought one about a year ago for a specific job which was slotting a bunch of small shafts. It paid for itself in a few days. Now I use it several times a week. I added a Heinrich 5C air collet vise that works great on that little mill for volume production. Tom

wierdscience
01-06-2009, 10:57 PM
Nice job on the rebuild.

That spindle setup the way that works is the front bearing locates the spindle in the casting.The bearing retainer plate holds it in the front and the retainer ring holds it in the back.

The nut and pipe spacer lock the spindle into location in the front bearing and hold the rear bearing while allowing the rear bearing to float in the housing to compensate for thermal expansion.

Those little mills are handy,too handy to get rid of.The first time you have 200 1/8" key slots to cut,or 50 screw slots to cut you will find it very useful.

torker
01-07-2009, 07:22 AM
Whoa Bill! Nice job you did there!!!
That lil mill is cuter than a bugs ear! I'm sure you'll find a use for it.
Russ