PDA

View Full Version : Anybody familiar with Van Norman Mills?



hawgwrench
01-10-2009, 08:29 AM
I dont have any exact info as to model right this sec....but is pretty cheap and very close in location....anybody familiar with these machines?....looks like a alot larger machine than my old Millrite....I'm gonna make effort to go have a look monday,and theres several other items that may be of interest...once I check everything out I'll try to post whats there and condition...

rockrat
01-10-2009, 08:53 AM
I own one and love it. I think that I did a rundown in the past. I'll search for it and let you know if I find it. Until then, in general,

1) Many are nice heavy machines. Take big cuts all day long. But, spindle speeds are lower than newer machines.

2) Some take 5V collets. Originals are hard to find. New ones made here or china on ebay for under $200 a set of 10

3) Some internal drive chains are hard to find once broken. This only effects the automatic feed. You can still crank it by hand.

4) HEAVY. Mine is about 3,300lbs. It is a 22L.

5) It has a nice following on the web but not large. Yahoo has a group and it is discussed here as well as on PM, where it has a listing with a few other heavy machines alike to Cincinnati and KT. Also there is a fellow with a dedicated website for the VN.

6) There is still parts support for many of the machines parts, but not all.

7) Get the over arm supports with the machine if you buy one!

Let us know more about it and we can narrow down more things to look for.

rock~

torker
01-10-2009, 08:58 AM
Here is a very good site...
http://jmkasunich.com/vannorman/VN_Home.htm
There may be a cast in model number at the front of the base.
Like most VN's I've read about...it's probably a heavy sukker.
I have a 2SU (Standard Universal) that weighs about 6600 pounds...mine is more as it has a BP head mounted on it as well.
I'd like to see pics of it.
Russ

rockrat
01-10-2009, 09:10 AM
Here is a very good site...
http://jmkasunich.com/vannorman/VN_Home.htm
Russ

Indeed. Thats the one I was trying to remember.

Here is one of the parts places.
RPI - Repair Parts Inc
http://www.repair-parts-inc.com/about.htm

rock~

Bmyers
01-10-2009, 09:27 AM
I have a #12, I love that machine. Watch when buying 5V collets they can be worn. There is a Van Norman group on Yahoo

Saratoga Bill
01-10-2009, 10:15 AM
I've also got a van Norman 12. really good machine working both horizontal and vertical. Only problem with mine is that the chain for the table drive is stretched so bad it will not function. RPI price for a new one is out of sight. Project will be to convert this to a tooth belt drive.

Bill

derekm
01-10-2009, 10:38 AM
I've also got a van Norman 12. really good machine working both horizontal and vertical. Only problem with mine is that the chain for the table drive is stretched so bad it will not function. RPI price for a new one is out of sight. Project will be to convert this to a tooth belt drive.

Bill
it isnt just a length of "industrial" drive chain?

rockrat
01-10-2009, 10:54 AM
it isnt just a length of "industrial" drive chain?

I have not had mine apart but the chain is a unique size. Why? I dont know. There are long threads on the yahoo site about trying to find this chain and/or trying to find an equivalent.

rock

hawgwrench
01-10-2009, 11:00 AM
Here is a very good site...
http://jmkasunich.com/vannorman/VN_Home.htm
There may be a cast in model number at the front of the base.
Like most VN's I've read about...it's probably a heavy sukker.
I have a 2SU (Standard Universal) that weighs about 6600 pounds...mine is more as it has a BP head mounted on it as well.
I'd like to see pics of it.
Russ
thanks for all the info yall...from the pics on this site one (turns out there are 2)appears to be a model 12....the other is considerably larger...cant identify yet....thanks again for all the help,I'll post more info as I get it...

Bmyers
01-10-2009, 12:52 PM
I have not had mine apart but the chain is a unique size. Why? I dont know. There are long threads on the yahoo site about trying to find this chain and/or trying to find an equivalent.

The drive chain used on VN mills is of the silent type. not widely used anymore. I have seen them converted to bicycle chain and timing belt.

Carl_In_NH
01-10-2009, 04:51 PM
I have a VN #26; it's ~5300 pounds of cast iron, with 2 HP on the power feed and 3 HP on the spindle. These larger machines have a 50 taper spindle - and that's mighty nice to have if you can afford the room in the shop for the bigger machine. They typically don't go for much money because of the large footprint they require - but they will mill anything you can swing up onto the table and secure. Nice to have the angling head and movable ram - and a few arbors for horizontal milling. Spindle speeds on the larger machines cover quite a range - mine is from 30 to 1500 RPM if memory serves, in 18 steps. Also has 18 feed rates plus rapids in all directions, too. If it's not beat to death, and you've got the space in the shop, I personally wouldn't hesitate to give one of these a home - they are a real, no nonsense industrial machine. Makes me smile every time I fire it up for a cut.

If you can't find the model number on a plate on the front of the base of the larger machine, take a look at the top of the dovetail ways for the knee - the serial number and two-digit model number were stamped there on my 26. The Yahoo! group is a great source of information - make certain you join up.

Regards,

-Carl

lane
01-10-2009, 06:33 PM
I have a VN 12 with all the attachments . Nice old machine It is not a Bridgeport but will do an awful lot.
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w277/lane5263/VanNormanMillwellssaw017-1.jpg

bhjones
01-11-2009, 12:16 AM
A full size mill is the last bit of machinery I need to add to the shop. I like some of the aspects of the VN a lot (minus the fixed quill), so I'm curious Lane if you had the option of the std. Series One with a 9x42 table and the #12 VN which would you go for, and why?


I have a VN 12 with all the attachments . Nice old machine It is not a Bridgeport but will do an awful lot.