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sidegrinder
01-13-2009, 12:22 AM
I got a laptop for Christmas, and it sure is nice to be able to wander around the house and keep up with the soap opera--er, HSM Forum:). Anyway, can somebody enlighten me on how to set things up so I can receive all emails to both the laptop and desktop. Right now, which ever computer opens an email first keeps it--no trace to the other. I've changed the setting to allow the emails to stay on the server, but that didn't seem to work out. If it matters, the laptop is running Vista and the desktop is XP. TIA, Rob.

dp
01-13-2009, 12:50 AM
I presume you're using Outlook - tell all Outlook clients to leave a copy of the mail on the server. Same thing is true for the Thunderbird mail reader.

ftl
01-13-2009, 01:36 AM
Leaving the mail on the server will eventually fill up the space allocated for you on the server. At that point people sending to you will receive an error because your mailbox is full. You need to empty the server mailbox periodically.

There is no really good way to do this. There are two decent solutions I have used:

1) Keep your mail files on one machine only (say the desktop). Share the folder containing the mail files (outlook.pst for Outlook or a bunch of .dbx files under a hidden "identities" folder for Outlook Express. I'm not sure what files Windows mail uses in Vista).

Setup both copies of your mail program to access the same files on the desktop machine.

Since Outlook [Express] keeps an exclusive lock on the mail files when it is running, only one copy of Outlook can run (either on the laptop or the desktop).

Keeping the files on the laptop has the advantage of having them with you when you travel with your laptop. You always need to keep the laptop running to access your mail from the desktop though.

2) This is what I do. I keep Outlook running exclusively on my laptop. When I am using the desktop, I use Windows remote control to access the laptop. On a local network it is very fast and you can barely tell that you are remotely accessing another computer.

Again, both machines need to be running all the time. It can also be a bit confusing when saving or adding attachments from the desktop because you are actually operating from a different machine.

For me this has the advantage that I only need to keep one copy of Outlook configured (I use a bunch of e-mail addresses and have a bunch of rules set up to automatically move mail around when it is received). Outlook does not make it easy to move all of its configuration settings from one machine to another. When I travel and take the laptop with me, Outlook is ready at all times, and I have all of my mail files with me.

winchman
01-13-2009, 03:02 AM
My ISP has a pretty good mail program (MagicMail) on their server. I use it 99% of the time by logging in there. I go through the inbox, and get rid of the occasional junk that sneaks by the spam filter. I also sift through the spam locker to reroute a few items to the inbox. I delete most messages from the inbox when they're two days old, and I dump the spam and trash every day. I rarely use the Outlook on my computer.

My wife downloads mail to her computer, which is set to leave copies on the server. She never goes to the server. She never sees all the garbage, so there's much less chance she'll open something that could screw up her computer.

We've been doing this for several years, and it works well for us.

Roger

macona
01-13-2009, 03:28 AM
Use an email client that supports IMAP protocol. Of course your email service must support this as well. Gmail does support it.

With IMAP it keep all my mail clients talking together. When I read a email om my iphone it is marked as read on my mac and if I log into mail.google.com and read from the web. Also if I delete an email it is deleted on all of them as well, Sent items are in the sent folder on all devices. Really works great.

Frank K
01-13-2009, 05:59 AM
If you are using Outlook, it allows you to specify how LONG to leave mail on the server after retrieval. I have the same situation with the laptop out in the shop. The laptop is configured to always leave all mail on the server, indefinitely. My desktop machine is configured to leave mail on the server for one day.

Mail retrieved with the laptop will always be available for retrieval by the desktop. Mail retrieved by the desktop will be available to the laptop for one additional day.

Adjust retention period to suit.

Evan
01-13-2009, 07:37 AM
I think Frank's solution is about the best short of using a system that supports IMAP. One thing to make clear though, Outlook is not the same as Outlook Express. Outlook Express is bundled with Windows up to and including Windows XP. Outlook is bundled with Microsoft Office and does not come with Windows. The programs are entirely different with different capabilities. So, when speaking on the subject, to avoid confusion be sure to accurately specify which program is meant.

Ken Gastineau
01-15-2009, 12:40 PM
I manage my e-mail accounts through Google Gmail. I can manage it through any computer anywhere I am as it is all web based. I have been doing it this way for a couple of months and I like it so far.

The onlly drawback is that I cannot access old e-mails without a connection.

Ken Gastineau

dp
01-15-2009, 01:09 PM
I think Frank's solution is about the best short of using a system that supports IMAP. One thing to make clear though, Outlook is not the same as Outlook Express. Outlook Express is bundled with Windows up to and including Windows XP. Outlook is bundled with Microsoft Office and does not come with Windows.

Isn't OE still available as a free download? That was how I got it but that was a couple years ago.

Evan
01-15-2009, 03:38 PM
Outlook Express has been included with Windows since WinME. I think it was a download as a part of IE for Win 98. I'm not sure though, that stuff is getting fuzzy around the edges. It's been a while.

Evan
01-15-2009, 03:42 PM
The onlly drawback is that I cannot access old e-mails without a connection.


Don't worry. Google can.

From their privacy policy:



Google maintains and processes your Gmail account and its contents to provide the Gmail service to you and to improve our services. The Gmail service includes relevant advertising and related links based on the IP address, content of messages and other information related to your use of Gmail.
Google's computers process the information in your messages for various purposes, including formatting and displaying the information to you, delivering advertisements and related links, preventing unsolicited bulk email (spam), backing up your messages, and other purposes relating to offering you Gmail. Google may send you information related to your Gmail account or other Google services.


That paragraph leaves it wide open for them to read your mail and use it any way they wish.

bruto
01-16-2009, 12:18 AM
I have a similar situation when I go away from home with the laptop, with the added problem that most wireless networks won't accept outgoing mail from other accounts than their own. What I do is to use my regular pop mail account on the desktop, and a web mail program on the laptop, which fetches from the same account. When I open mail on the laptop, it stays on the server, and when I open it on the desktop, it's taken off the server and I can keep it on my drive if it's worth keeping.

My ISP provides a web mail service that allows me to send from web mail using my regular address, which is handy. But even if you don't have that you can access the same incoming mail from another account.