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View Full Version : Parlmgren Rotary Table "Just needs a good cleaning"



oddball racing
01-17-2009, 04:07 PM
That's what the ad on flea-bay said. I kept trying to find a decent rotab without buying a newer one made offshore . After bidding on more than a dozen this one popped up.
http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m323/lightningale/EBAYPALMGREN.jpg

Then after spending about four hours in the shop on it, I show the end result.
http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m323/lightningale/100_0061-1.jpg
Total cost $204US including shipping. IMO thats better than a new chiwanese rotab at any price.
MIKE

barts
01-17-2009, 04:29 PM
That's what the ad on flea-bay said. I kept trying to find a decent rotab without buying a newer one made offshore . After bidding on more than a dozen this one popped up.
http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m323/lightningale/EBAYPALMGREN.jpg

Then after spending about four hours in the shop on it, I show the end result.
http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m323/lightningale/100_0061-1.jpg
Total cost $204US including shipping. IMO thats better than a new chiwanese rotab at any price.
MIKE

I have one of these I bought used back in the 80s... it works fine for what it is, but a horz./vert. table w/ tailstock and w/o the x/y axis would be more useful to me...

Nice job w/ the red handwheels...

- Bart

BadDog
01-17-2009, 04:30 PM
Looks nice. I've got a similar version in my shop, though not as gussied up. :D

Makes a good bolt circle tool (and the like) for a drill press, but pretty useless for milling. I haven't done it, but it could also be used to mount a vice or the like in order to set the angle (or adjust a feature on axis) and then run coordinate from there.

dp
01-17-2009, 05:04 PM
What is the problem that makes them useless for milling? I've never seen one let alone used one. I presume you mean the x-y table part?

Teenage_Machinist
01-17-2009, 05:11 PM
"not good for milling" WTF that thing looks disassembleable.

If not you might still modify it for use on the table...

lazlo
01-17-2009, 05:16 PM
What is the problem that makes them useless for milling? I've never seen one let alone used one. I presume you mean the x-y table part?

I have one too (hush Lane ;) ), and the table doesn't have a positive clamp with the base, so the table tends to lift up during milling operations.

However, it makes a fabulous drilling table, especially with the x-y adjustment. I have the two-piece vise jaws that Palmgren sold seperately, and it's really useful on a big drill press.

Nice build quality too, by the way.

BadDog
01-17-2009, 05:18 PM
Well, IMO, it is not suited to milling for several reasons. The cross slide castings are relatively light and the screw mechanism also relatively light. Then stack a (again, relatively light) rotary casting on top, and add a round table top that looks (disarmingly) beefy. But you've got back-lash and flex in every direction. Considering all the talk of eliminating the rotary base from Kurt vises to reduce flex, and it's pretty obvious that these Palmgrens (and similar) have issues in that department.

Not only that, the cross slide is on the "wrong" side to be useful on a mill. In that location it serves the same function as the mill table, so it's adding all sorts of problems for no benefit. Cross on the top is a WHOLE different ball game, but they are completely unrelated devices. And the worm drive for the table is absolutely tiny compared to a comparable milling rotary table. The "locks" (using that word lightly) for the table are also not nearly sufficient, and there are no locks on the cross slide (that I recall anyway). Basically, I would put use of this on a milling table at about the same functional level as using a drill press as a mill. Ok, maybe a bit higher as long as you use nothing bigger than 1/4" in aluminum, or perhaps ok for doing micros in a PCB or something.

Just my opinion, and I'm sure someone is going to say that they have used one for milling for years with good results, but I believe that a good look over one of these will dispel most thoughts of using it as a milling rotab. I've got the 12" model, and it doesn't even cross my mind to mount it on a mill. It is, however, great for mounting on a drill press, locate the table co-axial with the spindle, and crank out to a bolt circle radius (or otherwise locate it), then sit-n-spin...

Peter N
01-17-2009, 05:19 PM
What is the problem that makes them useless for milling?

Maybe the steel is a bit too hard, but then a nice carbide corn-cob rougher should mill it quite nicely :D





....ducks and runs

BadDog
01-17-2009, 05:22 PM
Ha! I almost made a similar statement, but decided against it...

dp
01-17-2009, 05:27 PM
Thanks, Lazlo and BD - that's the kind of thing you can't see in a picture.

barts
01-17-2009, 05:38 PM
I'll echo the "suffers from anemia (lack of iron)" comment; I've laid out plenty of bolt circles w/ mine, but the few slots I've done were tricky to keep right. The curved slot on the aluminum bronze slip eccentric drive on the steam engine in our 19' boat took a long time to do, and it is tiny. The ratio is pretty fast as well, which doesn't make it any easier.

- Bart

Rustybolt
01-17-2009, 05:41 PM
LOL. Odball, you beat me. I have the exact same one , but mine cost 31 dollars.
I havent used it yet, though.

Alistair Hosie
01-17-2009, 06:07 PM
Nice job you did on the restoration welll done. Alistair

NickH
01-17-2009, 08:45 PM
Nice job, looking good.
Would you use linear motion under the rotary table on a mill?
Nick

kvom
01-17-2009, 10:50 PM
I got one of those thrown in with my mill, although I'm not sure if it's a "palmgren" or a knockoff of the same. One of the t-slots is off-center (one arm shorter than other), so not that well made.

I used it the other day as a rounding table to round off a small brass part on the Bridgeport. It worked "OK" although the handle to rotate the table is a bit stiff. Seems to rotate 9 degrees per rotation of the handle.

oldtiffie
01-17-2009, 11:08 PM
Here is a current thread that - on the face of it - the "Palmgren" will fit right into but in reality may not be the best for the job.

A good discussion on both threads.

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=32688

Doozer
01-18-2009, 12:17 AM
Could you eliminate the "middle of the sandwich" axis and gain some rigidity?
Could you make some mounting plates and "flip" it so the x-y is on the top?
Otherwise, lipstick on a pig.
--Doozer

lane
01-18-2009, 06:32 PM
Those were made to use on a drill press to drill holes . They are not any good for milling . Besides the x-y slide is on the wrong side of the rotary table for good use. They look nice but every one I know that got one could not throw it far enough.