PDA

View Full Version : soda can -- half empty or half full?



aostling
01-17-2009, 06:49 PM
I found this oddity in a six-pack I bought last month. Something on the assembly line apparently malfunctioned, and this can was sealed with the contents only partially loaded. As you can see, it weighs 5.5 ounces, compared to 13.2 ounces for a full can.

I'm thinking of putting it on eBay, just to see what it will fetch. It could make an interesting (or frustrating) gift for "somebody who has everything." If the can is opened, it's monetary value (if any) disappears.

I want to know if it would be safe to ship this by air, in an unpressurized cargo hold. Would the reduced pressure risk ballooning the can outward? Or are soft drink cans routinely shipped as air freight?


http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/sodacan.jpg

Evan
01-17-2009, 06:57 PM
Cargo holds are all pressurized. That's where the pets travel.

aostling
01-17-2009, 07:02 PM
Cargo holds are all pressurized. That's where the pets travel.

Good point. What about USPS Priority Mail, does it go in pressurized holds too?

Teenage_Machinist
01-17-2009, 07:05 PM
My family had a tradition using two empty cans.

They were dressed up each Christmas CANnons, ReinCANated, ect.

mooney1el
01-17-2009, 07:21 PM
That can is neither "half empty" (pessimist) nor is it "half full" (optimist), but rather it is just twice a big as it needs to be (engineering).

Richard

IdahoJim
01-17-2009, 07:22 PM
Says right on the label "DIET"...it should only weigh half as much.
Jim ;-)

clutch
01-17-2009, 07:33 PM
I've had 3 cans that were half full in the last year. Sadly they were all beer cans. :mad:

Clutch

oldtiffie
01-17-2009, 07:59 PM
Jim,
I think the intent is that the dieter weigh only half as much and the tin weigh the same.

Clutch,
my solution would be to be thankful for small(er?) mercies and drink all that was there with the aim of getting me half full at least and all the cans quite emptied.

Too much is never enough. Well it was before I had to give up either the booze or the ghost!!!

JCHannum
01-17-2009, 08:05 PM
The only oddity would be if the full half were on the top. In the Pittsburgh area in the 60's around Christmas, Iron City beer would make a special run of Old Frothingslosh beer. The foam was on the bottom.

The sales jingle on the radio was; " Hey dittem dottom, the foam is on the bottom, the beer is on the top."

It was a seasonal treat that did not achieve a great deal of success.

Your Old Dog
01-17-2009, 08:41 PM
With all the can collectors out there I can't believe you wouldn't be handsomely rewarded by putting it on ebay. I have never seen a half full can, although I've seen many fools half in the can.

IdahoJim
01-17-2009, 11:31 PM
Jim,
I think the intent is that the dieter weigh only half as much and the tin weigh the same.



Hahahahahahah...LOL

Doc Nickel
01-18-2009, 12:16 AM
With all the can collectors out there I can't believe you wouldn't be handsomely rewarded by putting it on ebay.

-I may be greatly mistaken, but I was under the impression there's very little collectors' market for relatively modern soda and beer cans, unless it has some measure of fame (IE, "Billy Beer", which had some connection with Prez. Carter) or the company had since gone defunct.

Besides which, I understand that can collectors don't keep filled cans if at all possible- the soda or beer is usually somewhat acidic and will eventually eat away the can and start to leak.

I sold a "generic" beer can on eBay a year or two ago- the old white label with plain black printing, like the generic stuff from the late seventies. The can wasn't in great shape, but it sold for 99 cents, and the only reason the guy bought it was for a gag gift for a friend that collected beer cans.

I also know that some near-new condition all-steel Mountain Dew cans, the kind you had to use a church key to open, sold for less than $5 each on the 'Bay.

Again, I may be quite wrong, but I'd expect you'll get little or no interest in a half-full can of some obscure store-band diet soda.

Doc.

TGTool
01-18-2009, 12:50 AM
The only oddity would be if the full half were on the top. In the Pittsburgh area in the 60's around Christmas, Iron City beer would make a special run of Old Frothingslosh beer. The foam was on the bottom.

The sales jingle on the radio was; " Hey dittem dottom, the foam is on the bottom, the beer is on the top."

It was a seasonal treat that did not achieve a great deal of success.

Thanks, Jim. I've heard of Old Frothingslosh from years and years ago, but never knew where it was made. IIRC the search was for the worst beer made, and somehow that name came up.

aostling
01-18-2009, 02:57 AM
Again, I may be quite wrong, but I'd expect you'll get little or no interest in a half-full can of some obscure store-band diet soda.
Doc.

After my initial post I looked on eBay and found it has hundreds of cans, almost all of them with no bids. It won't cost me much to list it (with a very low starting bid), but now I don't have high expectations.

I learned that I should include a photo of the bottom of the can, to indicate it has not been drilled there. Apparently many cans are bottom-emptied by collectors, to leave the seal intact.

Evan
01-18-2009, 04:50 AM
I have three full cans of PT Cruiser Root Beer. I suppose I should "bottom empty" them?

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics5/rb.jpg

Doc Nickel
01-18-2009, 06:05 AM
Check eBay's "completed listings". That'll give you an idea how many actually had any bids or were actually bought. Just because there's a bunch listed now with no bids means little- collectors usually wait 'til the last second and "snipe" anyway.

Evan- I seem to recall someone saying that come can/content combos could start leaking in as little as five years, if not emptied. Beer and soda cans aren't designed for long-term storage.

That said, I have a 155ml Coke can- think the tall, skinny "Red Bull" style- with a Korean label and ring-pull tab, which I got out of the Officer's Mess on a bulk-cargo carrier some eighteen years ago. It hasn't started to leak yet, though I occasionally think I ought to drill it just in case...

I also tend to wonder what it tastes like. :D

I also have a fairly conventional 16oz glass Coke bottle- the classic shape- that I bought in a Piggly-Wiggly in Illinois in 1986. Full, unopened. The Coke looks okay- there's nothing floating, no suspicious sediments, etc.- but I'd imagine it'd probably taste pretty nasty by now. I kinda doubt Coke ages like a fine wine...

Doc.

Evan
01-18-2009, 10:33 AM
Incidentally, the PT Cuiser pop was a Canada only promotion as far as I know and the cans are bilingual labled in english and french. I wonder if that increases the value in the US?

KiddZimaHater
01-18-2009, 12:31 PM
Have you bought a bag of potato chips in the past 20 years?
Those things are always 'half full'. :mad:

Frank K
01-18-2009, 12:38 PM
Good point. What about USPS Priority Mail, does it go in pressurized holds too?

Yep. Priority and Express Mail fly on FedEx aircraft.

jkilroy
01-18-2009, 01:18 PM
This thread should certainly be labeled OT.

Alistair Hosie
01-18-2009, 02:28 PM
I do believe there are some nutters on ebay who will pay for canary spit bnut even I don't think this is worth a red cent sorry.I once bought a jar of spices sealed and through the glass you could see all sorts of houseflies beetles etc all long since dead when I reported it to the company they were very keen to get it back.being niave then I just gave it to them health and safety was not what it is today or they may have offered me a pretty penny for it's very quiet return.Alistair

aostling
01-18-2009, 05:08 PM
This thread should certainly be labeled OT.

I disagree. It was a question about the strength (or stability) of a thin-walled pressure vessel. Our forum has members with much experience in this.

bigbill04
01-18-2009, 05:23 PM
I have a totally empty can of Gablinger's Beer that my dad found in a six pack he purchased back in the early '70's. My dad was so amazed that a can can be empty while still sealed. It must have been filled on a Friday or a Monday. My dad held on to it figuring that one day it would be worth something. I have it now and one day I checked ebay to see how much something like that would fetch. I found several full cans of Gablinger's Beer listed and they weren't very valuable. One even had a buy-it-now price of $3.00. I just stuck it on a shelf. Maybe in a hundred years or so it may be worth $10. As to Evan's comment about airline cargo holds being pressurized, I can vouch for him. A couple of years back I sent a new spray can full of olive drab paint to a buddy in Florida. I packaged it for Priority Mail not thinking that it was not allowed. When the postal lady asked me if it contained any hazzardous items like paint, I just said no. I told my buddy that the paint was on the way and he scared the heck out of me. He told me once the plane reaches its altitude, the can would explode. He had me worried for two days. I expected the postal inspectors to come at any day to arrest me. Funny thing though, you could hear the ball inside the spray can rattle everytime the box was moved. I got lucky I guess. LOL

lunkenheimer
01-19-2009, 09:52 PM
Cargo holds are pressurized the same as passenger cabin for the main reason that you then have a pressurized cylinder. If the cabin was pressurized but the cargo hold wasn't then you'd have a half-cylinder and the floor would have to resist the total pressure differential. That would mean very heavy floor structures, amongst other problems.

But, cabin pressure in a passenger jet is _not_ the same as sea level air pressure. Everything in the cabin sees some reduction in pressure as the plane gains altitude. The actual cabin pressure can be controlled to a point by the crew, with the limit being the safe pressure vessel strength of the fuselage. The term used is 'cabin altitude'. In fact, flight attendants sometimes ask for the cabin altitude to be raised (pressure lowered) as this causes rowdy, somewhat intoxicated parties to become sleepy rather than rowdy. FYI

So, don't count on air freight seeing the same air pressures as a truck shipment! Also, items like paint are hazardous because of the possible effects of a leak just as much as because of the risk of bursting. Paint fumes are flammable, and in the recycled air of an airplane, are very hazardous. Hell, many truck movers won't deal with spray paint, and for good reason.

This isn't to point out anyone who has sent spray paint by air as a menace, just some background information for this entire discussion.

Evan
01-19-2009, 10:11 PM
Cabin Pressure is set not to exceed 8000 ft equivalent. It may briefly go higher than this if the aircraft must climb over weather but not for more than 30 minutes. The 8000 ft value is based on the maximum allowed pressure altitude of 12500 ft plus a safety factor for people with poor lung function. When flying without pressurization 12,500 ft is the limit for long duration exposure and may be exceeded to a maxumum of 15,000 for no more than 30 minutes. Even that isn't recommended unless you are acclimatised or already live significantly above sea level.

Some of the new aircraft such as the Boeing Dreamliner (I think) will fly with a lower altitude standard cabin pressure. This will make the flights accessible to more people that have lung problems.

tattoomike68
01-19-2009, 10:26 PM
Thanks, Jim. I've heard of Old Frothingslosh from years and years ago, but never knew where it was made. IIRC the search was for the worst beer made, and somehow that name came up.


"Frothingslosh pale stale ale with the foam at the bottom of the can"

It even had a big fat lady in a bathing suit picture on the can.

I do have an old budweiser that was printed upside down, its not too old steel can with an aluminum top.

http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f24/snoopdog6502/budbeer.jpg

BillH
01-19-2009, 10:42 PM
8,000ft is still a pretty good pressure drop. You lose 1" of mercury per 1,000ft of altitude gained. so if the airpressure was 29.92 at sea level, it would be 21.92 at 8,000ft.

This is enough to cause water bottles that were opened at 4,000ft then closed and not opened again, to be caved in the sides when you land. Vise versa, they release a good amount when opened up at altitude but nothing to be worried about, NOT like my stupid shop vac seperator made from a tin garbage can, piece of crap imploded on me.

Evan, the part 91 rules on the use of supplemental oxygen you referenced has more to do with Hypoxia than anything else.

aostling
01-24-2009, 04:02 PM
Again, I may be quite wrong, but I'd expect you'll get little or no interest in a half-full can of some obscure store-band diet soda.
Doc.

Doc,

You weren't wrong. After several days on eBay, with no bids and only one watcher, I canceled the auction for this unwanted can. Now I'm the sucker who is stuck with it, until the day I finally pop the seal.

Until then, I can shake the can whenever I need a little stress relief.