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Alistair Hosie
01-18-2009, 01:20 PM
Could you tell me how to overcome a slight problem I only occasionally have that is how to use my present of buy a new keyboard suitable for writing German i.e. umlauts and other German symbols s'ss and others do I need a new keyboard and software or just adapt my own I don't want it permanently on German letters I hope I am making myself clear.???Alistair

winchman
01-18-2009, 01:32 PM
I juat googled "german keyboard":
http://www.google.com/search?q=german+keyboard&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

On the second page is a hit for German keyboard stickers:
http://www.latkey.com/keyboard_stickers.asp?SubCat=56

http://www.latkey.com/images/stickers/M121.jpg

They include a "map" which (I suppose) shows where they go.

Seems like that would work.

Roger

bruto
01-18-2009, 01:39 PM
Could you tell me how to overcome a slight problem I only occasionally have that is how to use my present of buy a new keyboard suitable for writing German i.e. umlauts and other German symbols s'ss and others do I need a new keyboard and software or just adapt my own I don't want it permanently on German letters I hope I am making myself clear.???Alistair

In Windows, I think there are different ways of doing this, depending on how much of it you need. One is to remap the keyboard. There are various programs available to change key assignments. Another is to go to the "Regional and language" section of your control panel, and choose another language, but I'm not sure whether or not you can apply that only to the keyboard, or whether you'll end up with German all the way through. A third, if you're simply after the special characters, etc. is to get the "alt-number" key assignments. You can open the Windows character map program "charmap.exe" to see all the characters available in each windows font. There are standard assignments for special characters, using the alt key plus a number typed on the numerical pad with "numlock" on. Or you can simply copy and paste a symbol from within character map itself.

Here's one web page with some information on options: http://www.starr.net/is/type/kbh.html

e.t.a. I usually just have a little card next to my computer with the most common accent codes, so if I need an e acute, for example, I just put in alt-233, and get .

keelan
01-19-2009, 12:06 AM
Alistair,

Heave out that PC and get yourself a mac. There are keyboard shortcuts for most all of the letters used in other languages, and they're a lot easier to remember than the confounded alt-codes Windows uses...

typing option-u before a vowel sticks an umlaut over it (,,,,,), option-e before a vowel puts an acute accent (,,,,), option-i circumflex (,,,,), etc.

Things like have their own keystrokes (option-s), etc.

It sounds confusing, but they're much easier than the alt-codes to remember. Even if you forget, it doesn't take much trial and error to find what you're looking for.

- Keelan

nheng
01-19-2009, 12:45 AM
Alistair, A cheap and dirty but effective way is to open the Microsoft "character map". You'll find it under start, accessories, system tools, character map. Bring up the font you want to use then click and drag whatever special character you want over to the text you are typing in another application.
Den

Alistair Hosie
01-19-2009, 08:18 AM
Thanks guys when my son is here I'll get hime to help me with it with your encouragementm regards Alistair

bytewise
01-19-2009, 09:39 AM
MS Windows provides fairly convenient support for more than one language on the keyboard. You choose another language and it is set up so you can switch between it and English any time within a document. The accented characters are mapped to several of the punctuation keys at the right of the keyboard.
Look in MS Help, alternate keyboard for detailed instructions.

Dawai
01-19-2009, 09:45 AM
HI Alistair..

Why type at all? they have speech translators.. you can speak, it translates, they hear..

I'll look for the package I had on the old windows 98 crashed machine.. I had it registered.. ALSO.. you can take any text, be it web page, or scanned into text book convert it into a mp3, dump it to a cdrom or ipod, take it with you.. note cdplayer must be smart and mp3 capable.. like the fancy assed one in my lowrider truck. That is the proper way to travel.. I used to listen to symphonies.. now books.. I started reading up on that for Cousin Thrud.. I don't think he ever got it set up.. he was going blind.. NOW, I am on a big sony lcd with the most contrast of any monitor.. danged.. six hundred dollar monitor..

Hang in there bud..

Evan
01-19-2009, 09:51 AM
Alistair,

Why not buy a german keyboard? You should be able to find one there and it shouldn't cost more than 5 or 10. The only real difference when typing in English is that the Z and the Y are exchanged in place. I have a spare german keyboard but I am afraid it would cost more to ship than it is worth.

lazlo
01-19-2009, 10:28 AM
Heave out that PC and get yourself a mac. There are keyboard shortcuts for most all of the letters used in other languages, and they're a lot easier to remember than the confounded alt-codes Windows uses...

Fortunately, Windows has easy to remember keyboard modifiers too :)

First, enable the "English-International" keyboard setting (as opposed to "English-American". If your machine was built/configured in the UK, it's probably already configured that way:

Windows XP:

1) In the Control Panel folder, click on "Regional and Language options"

2) Select the "Languages" tab, and then click the "Details" button. This brings up "Text Services and Input Languages"

3) On the "Settings" tab of the new window, click on "Add.." . This brings up the "Add Input Language" window.

4) Input language should be English (United States). Click to checkmark the "Keyboard layout/IME" radio box, and in the drop-down box, select "United States - International". (If it's already installed, it won' t be there). Click on OK, click on Apply then OK on the Text Services and Input Languages window, and click OK on the Regional and Languages Options window.

Then all you do is:

<right Alt> a, e, i, o, u for acute
<right Alt> a, e, i, o, u y, for umlaut

lazlo
01-19-2009, 10:29 AM
Why not buy a german keyboard? You should be able to find one there and it shouldn't cost more than 5 or 10. The only real difference when typing in English is that the Z and the Y are exchanged in place.

If you touch-type, the swapped y and z keys will drive you insane. I grew up in German (my father was stationed there), and a bunch of the special characters are swapped as well:

http://www.aufgehts.com/images/German_Keyboard.png

Evan
01-19-2009, 11:08 AM
It didn't take me long to get used to it. I have used a german keyboard for about 15 years. It made it a lot easier maintaining the german language portions of my (now retired) unofficial -official Bowron Lake Park web site.

Anyway, here is a free remap utility that will allow the special characters to be assigned to whatever keystroke(s) you please .

http://webpages.charter.net/krumsick/

tony ennis
01-19-2009, 11:39 AM
duplicate posting

tony ennis
01-19-2009, 11:41 AM
If using Word,

1. Select Insert from the top menu bar
2. Select "Symbol..." from under that

A box comes up with a lot of symbols in it. Choose the one you want. Then click "Shortcut key."

This will tell you the keyboard control to insert the special character. No numerics required.

For example, to insert an unlauted cap U, I type control-colon followed by U. Alternatively, you can click the insert button and the character will be put straight into your document.

If you have Word but aren't using it for your task at hand, bring up Word anyway and create a pallete - a document of handy characters - as you go along. Whenever you need something German, copy-paste the character from Word. Save the pallete document and it will be handy for next time.

<-- copy/pasted from Word
<-- same. And found an error in Word's mappings. In is control-& then s not control-& then S.