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Sportandmiah
01-20-2009, 12:55 PM
First time long time. Glad to be a member.

Looking for some pictures of the Harbor Freight Micro Lathe, and the Mini Lathe, pics that can give me a sense how big or small these things are. Maybe a pic or two of each next to a ruler, or a soda can?

Regards

NSB
01-20-2009, 01:32 PM
http://www.mini-lathe.com/Default.htm

Lots of pics if you have a dig around.

Sportandmiah
01-20-2009, 02:07 PM
Great site, but I've looked through it many times. I've scoured the internet as well...lots of pics, but none that give me a sense of size.

tony ennis
01-20-2009, 02:38 PM
What do you mean by size?

For physical dimension, you know the swing is 7", so measure the drawing and scale appropriately. For weight, that's probably on the Grizzley site.

RPease
01-20-2009, 02:39 PM
You could try those interest groups that are linked from the site that NSB mentioned. They should be able to help.......

sansbury
01-20-2009, 04:59 PM
I'm looking at the typical inkjet printer sitting on my desk. Put two next to each other, that's roughly the size of my 7x10.

The micro-lathe (4x5) is about the size of a shoebox. First time I saw one, I thought "holy $#@! that's tiny!" You could easily put it on the kitchen table, do some turning, and put it back in a tupperware box on top of the fridge, assuming of course that your spouse let you. Supposedly they sell a ton of them in Japan since almost no one can afford dedicated shop space. The Sherline is longer, but in terms of mass I'd say it seems similar.

I've never made chips on either, so can't help you on how it might work. There is a dedicated Yahoo group for the micro-lathe.

Sportandmiah
01-20-2009, 05:25 PM
First time long time. Glad to be a member.

Looking for some pictures of the Harbor Freight Micro Lathe, and the Mini Lathe, pics that can give me a sense how big or small these things are. Maybe a pic or two of each next to a ruler, or a soda can?

Regards

I completely screwed up, I meant Micro MILL and Mini MILL, both from Harbor Freight. I've seen hundreds of pictures, but I can't tell the size without anything to reference them to, maybe a beer can or a ruler. And by size, I mean how big it the piece of machinery. I just can't visually size it up without something familiar in size next to it. Trying to figure how much room I will need in my shop.

Regards

S_J_H
01-20-2009, 06:01 PM
here's a pic of my old mini mill and mini lathe on a bench.
I miss those little machines!

Steve
http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n48/S_J_H/Picture003.jpg

heidad01
01-20-2009, 06:07 PM
I have a couple of HF 7x10's and 7x12. Approximation from memory, the foot print is about 8" front to back and about 24" left to right and the macine stands about 12" tall from the desktop to the top of the headstock. They do not take much room and can be set aside if not bolted down (less than 100lbs). If you have a bit more room, consider the HF 8x12. Much more rigid and a better machine, and if you wait and look at HF adds you can buy the 8x12 for not much more. 7x10s are just not comfortable to work with because of the small work aread between centers. least go for a 7x12. Also, 7x14s are becoming very common now a days DavidH

pcarpenter
01-20-2009, 06:19 PM
Here is a photo of my Grizzly mini-lathe and HF mini-mill in my former basement shop. I bought the HF mill for the R-8 spindle. Its on a standard Craftsman workbench and there is an Enco catalog on the shelf above it for size reference. I think the bench is right around 60 inches long.

I hope this helps. Of course, actual dimensions and (more importantly) work envelopes are available on the web sites of the various companies that make these. For a given specified work size, they are all pretty similar (ie the 7x10's are not quite comparable with 7x14's, but any two makers of the 7x10 make units that are about the same physical dimesions.

http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n16/pfcarpenter/shop%20pictures/LatheandmillSmall.jpg

Paul

Teenage_Machinist
01-20-2009, 08:08 PM
DO NOT BUY A MICRO MILL UNLESS YOU HATE MACHINING! BUY A MINI MILL INSTEAD> IT IS ABOUT THE SAME SIZE AND WAAAAYYYY BETTER FOR THE COST. THE ONLY ADVANTAGES OF A MICRO MILL ARE THE SENSITIVE DRILLING FEED AND THE SLIGHTLY SMALLER SIZE/COST



:mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:

I hate that machine, gonna buy an X3 as I will have money saved up before too long.

doctor demo
01-21-2009, 01:14 AM
DO NOT BUY A MICRO MILL UNLESS YOU HATE MACHINING! BUY A MINI MILL INSTEAD> IT IS ABOUT THE SAME SIZE AND WAAAAYYYY BETTER FOR THE COST. THE ONLY ADVANTAGES OF A MICRO MILL ARE THE SENSITIVE DRILLING FEED AND THE SLIGHTLY SMALLER SIZE/COST



:mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:

I hate that machine, gonna buy an X3 as I will have money saved up before too long.
Don't hold back... Tell us how You realy feel with out sugar coating it.

Steve

tiptop
01-21-2009, 01:28 AM
Gotta love it, hey Steve. These kids these days, never happy. Jay

Teenage_Machinist
01-21-2009, 01:30 AM
Oh, well, it either really has rigidity issues or I am always climb milling. And I know I am not climb milling.


Frankly for the class of machine a mini mill is far better and can use more common tooling.

This apparently does not apply to the KX1 mill whihc is much more rigid.

Sportandmiah
01-21-2009, 02:02 AM
DO NOT BUY A MICRO MILL UNLESS YOU HATE MACHINING! BUY A MINI MILL INSTEAD> IT IS ABOUT THE SAME SIZE AND WAAAAYYYY BETTER FOR THE COST. THE ONLY ADVANTAGES OF A MICRO MILL ARE THE SENSITIVE DRILLING FEED AND THE SLIGHTLY SMALLER SIZE/COST



:mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:

I hate that machine, gonna buy an X3 as I will have money saved up before too long.

Your post says the Micro is: More affordable than the Mini, is about the same size as the mini, and has a better drilling feed than the mini. Sounds like I'll get the Micro unless this time you can explain to me why I shouldn't.

LG
01-21-2009, 03:14 AM
Sportandmiah
Take Teen_Mach's advice and don't buy a Micro Mill I have one and can tell you that there are no advantage's over a Mini Mill they are just not ridged enough and you will be really disappointed they should be removed from sale or come with a warning like " These Machine's are Crap"

Lee

danlb
01-21-2009, 03:44 AM
Here's a picture with the following references:

A minimag (2aa ) light on the 2 inch wide precision vise.

The gap between the topmost box and the brace under it is 1.5 inches

The table is an aftermarket 15 x 6 inch part and cost an extra $80.

Yes, the mini-mill is much more capable. But a 1/2 ton knee mill is even more usable. But then again, I can move the micro mill off the bench if I need to.

The micro is not super rigid, but if you tighten the gibs and the backlash adjusters you can do a lot using sharp tools and light cuts. Tonight I managed to stall it for the first time in 2 years. I forgot which mill I was using and took a .10 cut while side milling instead of the normal .025. On the third pass it grabbed, moved the vise and stalled. No damage. :) None to the mill anyway.

The techniques used on the micro are exactly what you use on a Bridgeport. The same tooling is available once you learn where to look. Endmills, fly cutters, boring heads.... etc.

I've cut aluminum, brass, copper and steel on my micromill. The key is to take cuts that are appropriate for the mill and the material. It's great for the small cutters, since it does over 2,000 RPM.

If I were to buy a benchtop mill today, I'd go with the mini-mill. Taking cuts twice as deep with cutters that are twice as wide means you can do the same work in 1/4 of the time.


http://home.earthlink.net/~dbsweb/micromill1.jpg

This picture shows the vise on the original table setting which is on the aftermarket table. The bigger the table the more complex your setups can be. I usually use the vise for most everything, though I also have collets, a small rotary table and clamps, etc.

http://home.earthlink.net/~dbsweb/b+l_tables.jpg

Good luck with your decision.

Dan

danlb
01-21-2009, 03:56 AM
I forgot to include another picture with a reference.

The guy is 5'9, 200 pounds. You can guess which of the two mills is the HF model.


Dan

http://home.earthlink.net/~dbsweb/mill/leaninghfs.jpg


http://home.earthlink.net/~dbsweb/mill/leaningMrWong.jpg

Sportandmiah
01-21-2009, 04:28 PM
Thanks guys. I went to HF today, and they had the Mini and Micro Mills and Lathes on display. Sure enough, the mini and micro mills are almost the same size, but I was impressed how smooth and tight the Micro floor model was. I'll probably just stick with the Micro. It's easier on the wallet, and I think that with proper cleaning, adjusting, tuning, etc. it will suit me just fine. I will be making 1/32 slot car parts, aluminum and brass, small stuff. Thanks for the pics and info, much appreciated.

danlb
01-21-2009, 10:27 PM
Glad to have been of some help.

I wonder if the posts would have been different if you had mentioned the 1/32 slot cars at the start ? :)

Dan

wierdscience
01-21-2009, 11:29 PM
Just a suggestion,have you considered Taig?

http://www.taigtools.com/mwlinks.html

Sportandmiah
01-22-2009, 04:11 AM
Just a suggestion,have you considered Taig?

http://www.taigtools.com/mwlinks.html

Yeah, Taigs are nice, but pricey, for me at least. I've pretty well researched every make, model, color, retailers, etc.

Sportandmiah
01-22-2009, 04:13 AM
Glad to have been of some help.

I wonder if the posts would have been different if you had mentioned the 1/32 slot cars at the start ? :)

Dan

LOL, probably. I guess it would have helped, especially since I won't be machining big items.

macona
01-22-2009, 05:37 AM
Your post says the Micro is: More affordable than the Mini, is about the same size as the mini, and has a better drilling feed than the mini. Sounds like I'll get the Micro unless this time you can explain to me why I shouldn't.


More along the lines that the mini does not take up much more than the micro and does not cost more.

The micro is a joke. Not rigid, not fast enough spindle. Needs a whole lot of work before it is usable. Even a little pressure will deflect the head/column. the table is so small its almost useless as well the travel. By the time you buy any upgrades to make it somewhat useable you have as much invested in it as a mini.

Next is the taper. it uses MT2 in the spindle so you are stuck using MT2 collets or MT2 end mill holders which eat Z. There are very few accessories available for MT2 spindles. The mini is available in R8 which is the same taper as a bridgeport. That means there is all sorts of cheap tooling with a large variety.

macona
01-22-2009, 05:43 AM
http://i65.photobucket.com/albums/h228/macona/Supermax%20CNC/DSC02690.jpg

danlb
01-23-2009, 12:08 AM
That's a great one. I looked at it twice before I noticed the micro-mill on the table.

I'd have to disassemble my micro-mill before trying to mill a new flat on the top of the motor.

Dan