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jr45acp
02-06-2009, 01:43 PM
First: I've got a piece of Dura Bar that is sufficient in size to turn into a pair of either 123 or 246 blocks. The question is, for the home shopper, would this be a bad material choice?

Secondly: I've got a 13 x 36 Clausing lathe that sits way to low for me due to a back issue. I've had several thoughts on approaches to raise it up higher (I need to go about 6 inches). I'd really appreciate input on varying approaches to this as well!

Thanks In Advance!

lazlo
02-06-2009, 01:48 PM
First: I've got a piece of Dura Bar that is sufficient in size to turn into a pair of either 123 or 246 blocks. The question is, for the home shopper, would this be a bad material choice?

That's a great material choice. In fact, that's Forrest's first project for his scraping classes: scraping a gage block out of DuraBar.


I've got a 13 x 36 Clausing lathe that sits way to low for me due to a back issue. I've had several thoughts on approaches to raise it up higher (I need to go about 6 inches). I'd really appreciate input on varying approaches to this as well!

See MickeyD's Ghetto lathe mounts made out of barbells:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=33133

dp
02-06-2009, 01:51 PM
Given the cost and availability of 123 and 246 blocks I think I'd save the durabar for another project where alternate solutions are less common.

Raising a machine height is common enough but the solutions I've seen tend to be tuned to what's on hand and what skills are available. Making cubes of 6x6 square tubing with an internal brace is a possible and rugged solution. Putting a riser under the head and tail stock doesn't change the height of the carriage and other controls, but does give a bigger swing.

dp
02-06-2009, 01:52 PM
See MickeyD's Ghetto lathe mounts made out of barbells:

Six inches is a lot of barbells :)

Mcgyver
02-06-2009, 01:56 PM
i think its an good use for that material. I have a bunch of cast iron tooling and its served me well.....if you have the facilities, hardened and ground is better or at least more durable but without a grinder I'd being going cast iron. Its also the nicest material to scrape which gives you the ability to make them very accurate with but modest equipment

.... or use them to raise the lathe :)

tattoomike68
02-06-2009, 02:13 PM
Secondly: I've got a 13 x 36 Clausing lathe that sits way to low for me due to a back issue. I've had several thoughts on approaches to raise it up higher (I need to go about 6 inches). I'd really appreciate input on varying approaches to this as well!

Thanks In Advance!

On the bad back issue I found the easy away around that is to make a short bar stool with a backrest and dont get into the habit of leaning over the carriage with your face up close to the work. too many people stoop over the lathe and that would hurt anyones back over time. the stool I made also worked when running a mill.

SGW
02-06-2009, 02:26 PM
I don't have any super-nifty way of raising up a lathe, but I encourage you to do it. It makes all the difference in the world to have it right.

As you probably know, a good guideline is to have it such that your forearm is horizontal when turning the carriage handwheel.

bob_s
02-06-2009, 02:36 PM
One trip to the local Home Depot to purchase two railroad ties.

Put in place and somehow grunt the lathe on top.

MickeyD
02-06-2009, 02:51 PM
You want to put it on something a lot more solid than wood, the wood will move around during the season from changes in humidity and you will never keep it level. I would weld something together to get it up that much.

johnc
02-06-2009, 03:12 PM
How about pouring some concrete pads? I did that for my Emco and it worked great. I made a couple of frames out of plywood and set them over some thin rubber padding for traction. I used a level to rough out the height of the boxes to compensate for the floor slope, cut them accordingly, and poured in some quickcrete. So far so good.
John

jr45acp
02-08-2009, 08:43 AM
Thanks for all the feedback guys. Actually, I'd considered making some forms out of some scrap 2x6 I've got laying around and filling them with bagged concrete mix, but wasn't sure if that was a good idea.

Again thanks!

lazlo
02-08-2009, 11:32 AM
Six inches is a lot of barbells :)

LOL Dennis :) -- Mike uses the barbells as a base/nut. You can jack the machine as high as you're willing to support on the threaded studs :)

lane
02-08-2009, 06:24 PM
Over the years we have raised many a lathe up with this method. Saw some 4 inch square tube with at least 1/4 inch wall . Have used 6 inch with 3/8 wall depending on size of machine . Weld a cap on each end of 1/2 inch plate . Makes great risers .

J. R. Williams
02-08-2009, 07:45 PM
I have my lathe mounted on three sections of 6" "H" beam. It has worked well for the past 25 years. The beams are bolted to the the's feet and shimmed on the floor side to level the unit.
I needed the height to save my back. The Cholchester lathe is made for short people.
JTW

barts
02-08-2009, 08:37 PM
Secondly: I've got a 13 x 36 Clausing lathe that sits way to low for me due to a back issue. I've had several thoughts on approaches to raise it up higher (I need to go about 6 inches). I'd really appreciate input on varying approaches to this as well!
Thanks In Advance!

I raised my 4000lb 15" x 30" YMZ w/ three sets ('cause of three sets of levelers on the lathe) of 8"x6" wooden blocks made by bolting two 4"x6" blocks together w/ bolts and bridge washers. This raised the lathe 5.5", which is about right; I'm not tall at 5'9" but the machine just seemed too short.

Nothing is bolted to the floor, but the CG on this seems low enough.

- Bart