PDA

View Full Version : Making Allen Wrench Sockets



BigBoy1
03-03-2009, 05:47 AM
I need to make several Gib bolts that were missing on the lathe I'm rebuilding. The ones that are present have an Allen Wrench socket in the head. I have no access to rotary broaching tools so is there someother method that can be used to make the hexagonal hole in the bolt head? Thanks.

I can always resort to a slotted head but would perfer the Allen socket head.

Bill

oldtiffie
03-03-2009, 05:59 AM
Wow,

it must be tough where you live Bill.

I had to go to my steel supplier here in OZ a couple of times this week and included several lots of high-strength "hex" socket screws (metric);
- Hex head socket screws (HHSS): round head with hex socket;
- hex socket in a countersunk screw; and
- plain headless socket screws.

They carry a pretty full range of inch and metric on-hand and if not are only a day or two away on a regular delivery run.

NickH
03-03-2009, 06:05 AM
You could use a setup like this to get your hex but with a 1.5 to 3mm corner radius

http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q158/magicniner/DSC00775.jpg

(This shows an adapter plate clamped to the mill's locked quill which allows outboard mounting of a RotoZip which will run fast enough for 1.5mm carbide endmills, I broke a few until I goth the feel for DOC and feed:D )

then file or make a broach to sharpen the corners,
Regards,
Nick

Ian B
03-03-2009, 06:53 AM
Not sure how the sizes would come out, but can you tap a hole in a gib bolt, and then permanently loctite an Allan grub or cap screw in, to give you the hex socket?

Ian

BigBoy1
03-03-2009, 07:13 AM
Wow,

it must be tough where you live Bill.

I had to go to my steel supplier here in OZ a couple of times this week and included several lots of high-strength "hex" socket screws (metric);
- Hex head socket screws (HHSS): round head with hex socket;
- hex socket in a countersunk screw; and
- plain headless socket screws.

They carry a pretty full range of inch and metric on-hand and if not are only a day or two away on a regular delivery run.

I looked at manufactured socket Allen head cap screws but the head diameters are too small. The thread is 0.3125" and the diamater of the head must be 0.625".

Bill

kmccubbin
03-03-2009, 07:37 AM
How about buying screws with the correct head size, then machine the shank smaller?

Kerry

oldtiffie
03-03-2009, 07:40 AM
Thanks Bill.

The requirement is for a 5/16" thread and the head is to be 5/8"OD.

Is it possible to use a standard 5/16" hex head socket screw with a say 5/8" OD x 5/16+"id x say 1/8" (or to suit a slot in the gib) thick washer/disk as a temporary measure at least? The gib/s shouldn't need adjustment too often. The "washer/disc" could secured to the screw head with an adhesive or perhaps be silver-soldered onto the head if needs be.

SDL
03-03-2009, 08:46 AM
I need to make several Gib bolts that were missing on the lathe I'm rebuilding. The ones that are present have an Allen Wrench socket in the head. I have no access to rotary broaching tools so is there someother method that can be used to make the hexagonal hole in the bolt head? Thanks.
Bill

What material are you making them out of.

Try on a bit of scrap drilling at the AF of the allen key size, cut the angle off a std top quatiy allen key,syareoff to fine finish on grinder, put in tailstock and wind in, We used to make large pan hd allen and torx srews in 304 stainless.

Steve Larner

A.K. Boomer
03-03-2009, 11:30 AM
then file or make a broach to sharpen the corners,
Regards,
Nick



Your approach is similar to what I use when in a pickle except I just pamper a low RPM after a plunge cut with a max diameter endmill and just take out the corners with the smaller endmill --- I add one thing though,
I dont make a broach to take out the corners - I just rotate the rotary table 30 degree's for a re-start and then install the appropriate sized tiny endmill and readjust the X axis and plunge cut the corners out for clearance --- what you end up with (besides even more time invested:o ) is a socket head thats not only stronger than standard - it's easier on the drive allen flanks to boot, Its the reverse order of Snap-on's "flank drive" system in which the socket is the drive with the radius corners instead of the fastener ----
Im so limited on RPM's on my mill that I can only do this on fairly larger socket/bolt heads, But its nice to be backed into a corner for not having the equipment and yet end up with a superior Job because of it :D (despite the extra 20 times the amount of time it took:p ) Not only that - it just plain looks cool.

Roy Andrews
03-03-2009, 01:41 PM
similar to sdl when i need something custom Allen or torx i take the desired bit and chuck it in the lathe. then with my dremmel tool and the smallest grinding burr or diamond burr i hollow out the end to create cutting edges on the points. you have to use a high quality bit if you want it to last and don't over heat it. then chuck up the bolt and drill a hole the same size as across the flats of the Allen. now put your broach in the tail stock and put some good cutting oil on the hole. crank the tail stock in until it stops. back it out and pick out the burs and drive it in again. repeat as necessary. if you have a small lathe or are doing a big hole you may have to use a press. i have even hammered the bit in with good results. with really small allens you can just grind the end flat and then hone it real smooth and they seem to cut well.

BigBoy1
03-03-2009, 02:56 PM
Thanks Bill.

The requirement is for a 5/16" thread and the head is to be 5/8"OD.

Is it possible to use a standard 5/16" hex head socket screw with a say 5/8" OD x 5/16+"id x say 1/8" (or to suit a slot in the gib) thick washer/disk as a temporary measure at least? The gib/s shouldn't need adjustment too often. The "washer/disc" could secured to the screw head with an adhesive or perhaps be silver-soldered onto the head if needs be.

While eating my lunch today, I thought about the standard socket head cap screw and a "thick washer". I guess we both came up with the same idea. That seems to be the simplist and fastest way to get the job done. Silver soldering the washer in place is a good idea. I was think about a set screw or pin to secure the washer to the shaft of the cap screw.

If that doesn't work, I'll resort to the other methods, such as broaching with sharpened Allen wrench.

Really appreciate all of the help. Thanks.

Bill

derekm
03-03-2009, 03:02 PM
While eating my lunch today, I thought about the standard socket head cap screw and a "thick washer". I guess we both came up with the same idea. That seems to be the simplist and fastest way to get the job done. Silver soldering the washer in place is a good idea. I was think about a set screw or pin to secure the washer to the shaft of the cap screw.

If that doesn't work, I'll resort to the other methods, such as broaching with sharpened Allen wrench.

Really appreciate all of the help. Thanks.

Bill
Rather than a simple washer you could make a "Cup" washer that is also a sleeve around the head, this would be easier to permanent fix to the head.(e.g. you could make it a press fit) and would at least help keep out some of the swarf.

small.planes
03-03-2009, 03:18 PM
You can get large headed socket screws, the exact name of the type escapes me at the moment, but we have a large box of them at work for securing cover plates, which are M6 thread, but with a head thats larger than an M8 standard one. Try your local fastener place and ask them.

Dave

PaulF
03-03-2009, 04:02 PM
I’ve made various press tools, drill aprox hole in stock and use 20 ton press to form spline or in your case Allen socket.
Then machine whatever you need that can’t be gotten from Fastenall.

PaulF

pcarpenter
03-03-2009, 04:42 PM
I made a screw as discussed to replace one used for adjusting the cross feed nut on my Bridgeport mill. You can even countersink the allen head bolt some depth into the washer you make if its thick enough. I cleaned the "teeth" and black oxide off the outside of the bolt head in the lathe so that it would be clean, and then silver-soldered the whole works together. The original was a slotted screw, but this should be a notch or two better than the original. Slotted screws suck. They had their place in history, but so did horse driven carriages and wooden wheels.
Paul

Sparky_NY
03-03-2009, 05:41 PM
What about a button head allen cap screw? They have a od quite a bit larger than a standard allen.

EdC
03-03-2009, 07:40 PM
How long do they have to be?

You could start with a shoulder bolt with a long shoulder to get your head diameter.
A 5/16 bolt has a .375 shoulder and a 9/16 x 1/4 head
http://www.mcmaster.com/#cad-2d/=ui3iv

and a 3/8 bolt has a .50 shoulder and a 3/4 x 5/16 head
http://www.mcmaster.com/#97345a720/=ui5gs

lane
03-03-2009, 07:45 PM
Do like every one else does . Use a screw driver slot . A lot easier.

kf2qd
03-03-2009, 09:53 PM
Use a 5/16 setscrew and make the "head" with the matching thread on the ID and locktite the 2 pieces together. Should work just fine.

peter08
03-06-2009, 05:19 PM
Some of the suggestions seem to be describing a manual version of peck mode.

wtrueman
03-06-2009, 05:46 PM
How about an EDM (Electrical Discharge Machine) in your neighborhood) They are very accurate from what I heard, but price??? My $.02 Can. Wayne

BigBoy1
03-07-2009, 06:43 AM
To all that responded, thanks.

I've gotten the 5/16" socket head cap screws yesterday and today I'll be cutting the cupped, oversized washers that will fit on them so they will engage in the slots in the gibs. Will go to friends house next week and silver solder the washers to the cap screws. Then problem solved.

I would have used EDM if it was available. I live in very small town with farming as the main industry. Nearest large city with any machining capability is about 75 miles away.

Bill