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Too_Many_Tools
03-04-2009, 10:19 PM
I recently was told that Rockwell made a drill press with a foot operated downfeed.

Does anyone have one and how does it work?

Thanks

TMT

wierdscience
03-04-2009, 10:37 PM
Never seen a Rockwell with a foot operated feed,but they did make plenty with an air feed.

It consisted of a roller chain sprocket on the quill pinion shaft and a loop of roller chain linked to each end of a dual rod air cylinder.The cylinder push/pulled the chain which spun the quill pinion in place of the normal spider wheel for hand feed.

I suppose the chain sprocket on the pinion would be a start.Then connect one end of the chain to a spring and the other end to a foot treadle on the column base.

Jim Caudill
03-04-2009, 10:50 PM
Yes, they made one. I reworked the variable speed pulley for it. I don't know if I can get a picture of it, or not.

Walter
03-04-2009, 10:52 PM
TMT, I'll snag a picture of that drill setup in the next few days, we happen to have one. Although I don't generally use it it is like having a third hand, very handy at times.

winchman
03-05-2009, 05:57 AM
I installed a footswitch on my drill press so I could turn it on and off more easily. I wonder if I can learn how to use a foot-downfeed along with the on-off footswitch. That would give me two extra hands, wouldn't it?

Possible downside: So far, I've never had an drill press-related injury to the hand I've had on the downfeed handle.

Roger

Davidhcnc
03-05-2009, 06:04 AM
It is the best pic I could find, this is not mine.

http://i50.photobucket.com/albums/f344/stuartmitchell/Working%20photos/002.jpg

bruto
03-05-2009, 11:07 AM
I don't know about Rockwell, but Walker-Turner had one. It's not terribly useful for metal drilling, due both to the lack of sensitivity and force, but was a standard accessory for wood mortising.

speedy
03-05-2009, 03:20 PM
I was thinking, what a great idea!
It would free up both hands for holding the work; the vice and clamp could be put well away under the bench:eek:

Al Messer
03-05-2009, 10:47 PM
Nope---for safe as well as precision drilling, you will still need the vise and clamps.

macona
03-06-2009, 06:38 AM
I installed a footswitch on my drill press so I could turn it on and off more easily. I wonder if I can learn how to use a foot-downfeed along with the on-off footswitch. That would give me two extra hands, wouldn't it?

Possible downside: So far, I've never had an drill press-related injury to the hand I've had on the downfeed handle.

Roger

You could put a micro switch in line with the motor switch that would turn on the spindle when you start pressing on the pedal. Something like a roller type limit switch that would rest on the large portion of the quill. When the quill drops the plunger would extend turing on the motor.

bruto
03-06-2009, 04:38 PM
I should add to my above post that the Walker-Turner rig I once knew and used with a foot pedal was set up to use a wood mortising attachment which includes a fence and hold-down for the work. Hollow mortising chisels for a drill press do not require much downfeed pressure, but the work itself often requires repetitive operations to cut rectangular mortises with a square bit. Both hands would be used to hold and feed the work along the fence, and the foot pedal there makes considerable sense.

Walter
03-06-2009, 04:47 PM
http://pic1.picturetrail.com:80/VOL1167/4323122/17727806/357232010.jpg

http://pic1.picturetrail.com:80/VOL1167/4323122/17727806/357231993.jpg

http://pic1.picturetrail.com:80/VOL1167/4323122/17727806/357231996.jpg

http://pic1.picturetrail.com:80/VOL1167/4323122/17727806/357232004.jpg

Walter
03-06-2009, 04:48 PM
http://pic1.picturetrail.com:80/VOL1167/4323122/17727806/357232007.jpg

http://pic1.picturetrail.com:80/VOL1167/4323122/17727806/357231987.jpg

There ya go =) FYI with this setup, both the hand crank and the foot pedal operate together.

Mcgyver
03-06-2009, 05:08 PM
I can see this being of benefit for semi production, with the parts clamped in fixture or such, but very often parts are held in the vise that is then hand held or larger parts hand held directly on the table....balancing on one foot i would suggest would make this precarious.

what i see is a great safety feature though is foot off switch and maybe even a brake

Walter
03-07-2009, 12:54 AM
We do alot of small hole production drilling, using both small foot operated, and air op drills, personally I hate the things. They do work, and when speed is of the essence they work well. As far as the Rockwell goes, I do find it nice if I have a really oddball part, it's like having a third hand for lining things up, or centering for tapping. Other than that, eh, it's not something I ever go out of my way to use. I guess the best thing I can say is this... If I had the opportunity to have one in my home shop for the same price as any regular drill press I'd opt for the foot pedal for the occasional job that really called for it.

Walter
03-07-2009, 12:58 AM
balancing on one foot i would suggest would make this precarious.

Balancing is a pain, but we keep stools at all the drills, including this one.

ARFF79
03-07-2009, 05:09 AM
I have one that is similar to the one that Walter posted. The foot pedal opperates an arm that is attached t oa semicircle of rack that engages the quill. Was listed as for use with the mortising attachment or with a drum sanding attachment allowing you to move the part with both hands while engaging the quill with the work. Can be held steady or pumped like an ossolating spindle.

Too_Many_Tools
03-08-2009, 12:03 AM
Walter, thanks for posting the pictures.

The one I heard about has some type of rack? in the head to move the quill while having a petal system like the one you show.

I have never heard of the head type that you have posted.

It makes sense that this would be used for wood mortising.

Which makes it even more curious since the model I was told about has a metal working table on the drill press...definitely not the woodworking version.

TMT

Walter
03-08-2009, 12:20 AM
glad I could help. =)