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View Full Version : O/T Need Some Clock Makers Help



jr45acp
03-09-2009, 07:54 AM
Folks, I'm in Forney, Tx visiting my folks and have a problem. My mother has an antique wall clock that she dropped and several pieces of the wooden box have been broken off. She has the pieces and wants me to "glue" them back on. I could do it, but they don't have any tools to work with to obtain a satisfactory result and I think the old pieces deserves appropriate attention. I have no idea of the value of the clock, but I'm going on 61 and it's been around ever since I can remember.

Here's the question: Does anyone in the DFW area know of a competent wood worker that might be able to tackle this?

Any thoughts are greatly appreciated. As for the clock works themselves, that will be dealt with later.

moe1942
03-09-2009, 08:23 AM
I repaired clocks until I closed the shop years ago. Many things to consider here. Even a good wood smith will not be able to duplicate old wood. I always tried gluing the pieces back. If there are no little shards of wood involved you can do it. Use Elmers wood glue and remove any residue from the surface. Furniture scratch repair crayons can make any visible line almost disappear.

I primarily repaired the works but did make a few case repairs.

Circlip
03-09-2009, 08:25 AM
If it's over sixty years old John, make sure whoever repairs it is going to use the same type of glue that it was ORIGINALLY glued together with, chances are an animal type glue. The more modern ones will certainly stick it back together but could strain the original joints as the wood "Moves"

Regards Ian.

Ed P
03-09-2009, 09:39 AM
Folks, I'm in Forney, Tx visiting my folks and have a problem. My mother has an antique wall clock that she dropped and several pieces of the wooden box have been broken off. Here's the question: Does anyone in the DFW area know of a competent wood worker that might be able to tackle this?

Any thoughts are greatly appreciated. As for the clock works themselves, that will be dealt with later.

To find a competent clock repairman who would be able to advise you
on case repair try here, on the left side.

http://www.awci.com/

Ed P

SGW
03-09-2009, 10:13 AM
For repairs to antiques, fine furniture, etc., restorers use liquid hide glue because it's a reversible process. It can be dissolved again.

jr45acp
03-10-2009, 09:33 AM
Thanks for the feed back Guys. I'm trying to convince her that it's worth doing right. I could, as I said, do it, but I'm not going to be here long enough and I don't have anything to work with.

Just had a thought, I'll try to convince her to ship it to me when I get home, then I'll do the wood repairs correctly and the town I live in has a real clock/watch maker who could advise as well as go over the works and set them right. I guess when I posted originally, I wasn't thinking straight. Those of you who have aging parents know how tedious they can be.

Anyway, thanks!