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View Full Version : Valspar Industrial Enamel - Product Review



Fasttrack
03-31-2009, 03:10 PM
Two thumbs up for "Professional Valspar Industrial Maintenance Enamel". I bought it for my Pacemaker and I have to say this is some awsome paint. It costs the same as Rustoleum, but it out-performs it. The paint is more fluid than Rustoleum, not "thinner" but less viscous. Brush marks don't show up, even when using the crappy disposable chip brushes. You have to be a little careful because it will run everywhere. I started off applying it like Rustoleum and found that it was way too heavy of a coat. It goes on in a thinner coat but leaves a glossy, hard and near indestructable surface!

It has been 8 days since I got a splotch of gray paint on the back of my hand. Since then, my hand has been submersed in gasoline and been exposed to acetone, as well as denatured alcohol. My hands have been covered in grease, oil and grime, been scrubbed with orange cleaner (the kind with the pumice), washed with go-jo and dish detergent. Wonder of wonders, the paint splotch is still on my hand! I hope it comes off soon ... :)

tiptop
03-31-2009, 04:31 PM
Fasttrack,
I have used other Valspar products, but not their paint yet. Actually I wasn't aware they made a lower priced paint. This is good information thanks for posting. Now are you going to post some pics of your paint job?
Jay

Fasttrack
03-31-2009, 04:39 PM
:) I haven't finished it yet. The lathe is on my BIL's farm, about 3 hours from me. Between work and classes, I don't have alot of time to work on my lathes. This is how far I have gotten though:

Before:

http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n22/fasttrack237/Pacemaker/100_0582.jpg

After:

http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n22/fasttrack237/Pacemaker/100_1440.jpg

http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n22/fasttrack237/Pacemaker/100_1439.jpg

wierdscience
03-31-2009, 10:48 PM
Fast,I can spit and hit the Valspar plant from here.

Good paint BTW,it isn't two part by any chance?Some of the urethane's are nasty on the lungs,so be careful.

barts
03-31-2009, 11:33 PM
Since then, my hand has been submersed in gasoline and been exposed to acetone, as well as denatured alcohol. My hands have been covered in grease, oil and grime, been scrubbed with orange cleaner (the kind with the pumice), washed with go-jo and dish detergent. Wonder of wonders, the paint splotch is still on my hand! I hope it comes off soon ... :)

Fasttrack - do your body a favor, and buy some nitrile gloves. If you work w/ nasty stuff for a living, it's really worth minimizing skin contact.

Yup - industrial paints are are better than the mass market stuff.

-= Bart

dan s
04-01-2009, 03:24 AM
Fasttrack,

What retailer did you purchase it from, inquiring minds want to know?

ptjw7uk
04-01-2009, 11:45 AM
Read this post so thought I would google valspar etc and google has picked this post already - so the forum fame is speading far and wide!!


Peter

ehughes
04-01-2009, 12:30 PM
Dan S, Around here ( N. IL) Farm & Fleet carries it, don't know if they are down your way or not. Regards, Earl

Fasttrack
04-01-2009, 12:35 PM
Yep - I picked mine up at a "Blaine's Farm and Fleet". I suspect other farm and home type stores might carry it, too.

pcarpenter
04-01-2009, 05:09 PM
I have used the stuff a lot including my Bridgeport restore. It's available under another label (BPS or Best Paint Sold) at Tractor Supply stores too. I would agree that its top notch and much better than several others I have used including Rustoleum enamel.

Two recommendations: They make a hardener that will make the stuff quite hard. The hardener also makes the paint flow *really* nicely. The little can goes in a gallon as I recall, but you will have to do some math to figure out the ratio to make small batches. Once hardener is added that paint will be done for in just a while so don't make a big batch. You will know when its time to quit painting with it too...you can see it start to cure and flow will change. Quit at that point and don't try smoothing out what will soon be paste. They instruct you to stir the stuff in off and on over a half-hour before beginning to paint. I assume its to start the reaction going.

Another tip is to use Naptha as a thinning agent when brushing. It doesn't take much, but the paint flows *really* nicely and dries with a higher gloss.....much like the effect from the hardener, too. I found that Mineral spirits, on the other hand tended to turn it more matte finish and it did not flow as well.

Paul

dan s
04-01-2009, 06:02 PM
Paul,

do you know if it can sprayed if you thin it?

pcarpenter
04-01-2009, 06:19 PM
While I have not sprayed it, the can directions indicated that it can be sprayed as I recall. I guess I never even questioned that *any* enamel would spray, but I suppose some will not?

On the other hand, this is not a great automotive enamel and I would tend to think it may be better sprayed at a moderately thick consistency like an HVLP gun will allow for.

Paul

randyjaco
04-01-2009, 06:26 PM
I haven't used the industrial paint yet, but Valspar tractor paint is excellent. Thanks for the review. I'll give it a try.

dan s
04-01-2009, 06:41 PM
On the other hand, this is not a great automotive enamel and I would tend to think it may be better sprayed at a moderately thick consistency like an HVLP gun will allow for.

that's what I got. :D

dan s
05-05-2009, 11:48 PM
I just wanted to give a little update on something I asked a little earlier in this thread.

Valspar Anti-rust "Maintenance enamel" can be sprayed, if you thin it down. The can says not to thin it, but I've gotten excellent results by thinning it with Naphtha.

The attached photo is a length of flat bar that I sprayed using an HVLP gun.

http://img413.imageshack.us/img413/6316/sprayed.jpg (http://img413.imageshack.us/my.php?image=sprayed.jpg)

tony ennis
05-06-2009, 12:33 AM
Good heavens. It took me a few seconds to figure out what I was looking at.

lazlo
05-06-2009, 11:01 AM
Good heavens. It took me a few seconds to figure out what I was looking at.

Likewise. That's pretty promising Dan!

MickeyD
05-06-2009, 11:39 AM
I got a gallon of it and their red oxide primer at Lowes. It took about half an hour but they were able to get a good match to my Monarch lathe. The primer does have a settling problem and you really need to mix it with a power mixer, but it is very self leveling and is good at covering pinholes and small blemishes in raw castings. I pulled the side door off of my old shaper (the paint is in horrible shape on it) and cooked it clean in an electrolysis bath. The primer went on well with a chip brush and left a decent finish, but the paint does benefit from using a good brush and gives a nice finish (but not as nice as the mirror finish above). I cannot tell how tough it is yet, but sofar it seems much better than Rustoleum.

pcarpenter
05-06-2009, 02:03 PM
I am not a big fan of the red oxide primers....most contain a lot of oil and are designed to go on over rusty stuff. In fact, the rustoleum stuff recommends that it be used *only* on rusty stuff. I have primed and then painted a few things and I know why: The primer is and remains fairly soft....making the finish easily damaged. The paint and the soft primer underneath scratch very easily.

I found some gray primer made by Valspar for use with their paint...and it's sandable...even the stuff in the non-spray can. This means you can use it like you would any other automotive primer for cases where you want to prime and then sand first. Even at that, it's been my experience that I got the best adhesion on cast iron, without the primer. Porus cast iron really holds the paint and I don't mind seeing some of the texture of the cast iron without a thick coat of filler as I know it's more durable that way.

Paul

Jeffw5555
05-06-2009, 04:31 PM
I quit using enamel paints, mainly because there are so much better technologies these days. (of course, if it's just a very small item or something I don't really care about, I'll still use a rattle can...)

I've been using an industrial version of automotive paint made by PPG, called Urotec AUE-100. It's a two-part acrylic urethane, so it's much harder and more durable than enamels. It runs about $65 for a gallon, including the hardener, so it's more expensive than enamel, but not that much more when you factor in the corresponding larger leap in quality. I simply bring in a sample of what I want to paint, and my jobber matches the color for free.

I restore cars as a hobby, so I have all kinds of finishing equipment, so I spray everything, not brush. (plus I have a fresh-air respirator system...) PPG says you can brush-on the AUE paint, but I have not tried it.

The big bonus of using urethane is you can paint, and in 2 hours you can reassemble your parts without fear of scratching off the new paint.