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View Full Version : OT, Victory style garden, advice?



Dawai
04-01-2009, 05:58 PM
I know how to turn a wrench.. know how to light a torch.

I just started a victory garden, the old egg cartons (3) to start with, planted some tomato and green pepper seeds.. the egg cartons, well when you go to transplant them, you just take a thumb and pop the clod of dirt from the egg cradle into your hand and plant it.. (don't ask where I learned that)

any suggestions? I am ringing my fence here with climbing plants.. maybe plant some Other things.. what all is easy to grow and harvest? squash?

While grampa was raising a splendid garden each year, I was chasing split tails and riding hawgs.. wish I had paid more attention.. I did tune his tiller so it ran better than it ever had before.. he bragged on that till his death.. the first year he didn't raise a garden he died.. his reason to continue..

Any advice, bury fish with it? poke a hole in the ground with a stick like the old indians did??

topct
04-01-2009, 06:21 PM
Visit your local garden store. They can tell you what will grow best in your area.

Evan
04-01-2009, 07:03 PM
Don't bother planting things that are always available and cheap to buy. Potatos usually fall in that category. On the other hand tomatos are usually fairly expensive. Where you live a good tomato patch can be an annual crop. A lot of people don't know that tomatos will grow year over year as long as they don't get frozen. Those peppers you have will take a long time to produce, they are a late season crop. Zuchinni is a super fast and easy plant to grow and a couple of plants will give you enough zukes to make bread and still have fresh veggies. Pumpkin is always good if you like pumpkin pie but it's one of those crops that is usually too cheap to bother with.

All the cabbage family are easy to grow but you have to watch out for the European Cabbage Looper larvae. They can be controlled using BTK organic pesticide. Buy the smallest amount you can find and then culture your own in skim milk. It's a bacterium that is totally harmless except to the lepidoptra family.

I like beans and peas. Nothing tastes better than fresh off the vine green peas in butter. For the maximum food value in terms of essential amino acids you cannot beat beans of any type combined with corn. You can't live on either one alone but when you combine beans and corn they together contain all the essential amino acids that meat contains. You can eat a perfectly healthy vegetarian diet if it includes enough beans and corn.

Dawai
04-01-2009, 08:00 PM
Evan my wife brought home "cherry" tomato seeds last night.. I told her they were good to shoot in a slingshot...

I planted two dozen tomato plants today. Zucchini sounds interesting.. we eat a lot of it too..

Not got a big spot, so.. I am not sure I need a tiller or? There was two or more dead tillers up my moms homeplace.. I may bring home one.. It'll have to be gone though I am sure thou.. I sat on a block unsticking a valve on a 60's craftsman tiller.. when I got done you should have seen her eyes when it ran.. It was funny..

I ho'ed for about a half hour today.. I'm a ho'er from way back I guess. *cousin quote.. she has gone on to the next world with cancer. bless her. Some guy stopped his car and told her to put that hoe down she didn't know what she was doing.. that was her reply.. then she got redfaced and went inside embarrassed..

GadgetBuilder
04-01-2009, 08:17 PM
A lot depends on what you like to eat that isn't subject to local animals. Deer, raccoons, rabbits and woodchucks can eat stuff faster than you can raise it so a good fence is a requirement for most vegetable gardens. You can't really fence raccoons out; the only solution I've found is to choose crops they don't like - I can't raise corn or muskmellon because of them.

Then there are the insect pests. These tend to be local so a gardener in your area would be the best source on what to watch out for. In my area, squash borers are a problem that require spray - something I don't like to do so I use only about a quart of spray per year, applied with an old Fantastic spray bottle. This works because I know the date (within a couple days) when the moths will appear here so I can target them very specifically. Similarly with cucumber beetles - if I don't spray, the beetles spread a wilt that kills all the plants very quickly. Beans don't have insects here but may in your area. Beets grow without problems here as does Swiss Chard.

Use caution on how much of things you plant initially, most people plant more than they will consume so plan on giving some produce away. A half dozen swiss chard plants is enough for us, a 15 foot row of beets is about right, similar for bush beans, 6 squash plants, 8 tomato plants, a couple basil plants, etc. Plants need to be farther apart than you might expect - summer squash needs 5 feet between plants, for example. It takes some experimenting to determine how much of each to raise. Our neighbors are generally helpful in taking the excess although it's possible to sort of wear out your welcome if you have a bumper crop...

Many people tire of gardening because of the effort needed to weed. I don't weed much because I compost all our leaves and grass clippings directly on the garden. This provides a continuous mulch which controls weeds. When leaves are gathered in the fall, after frost kills the garden, the mulch is 2 feet deep but is only about 6 inches by spring. Rake it back to access the soil to plant, pull it back around the plants when they're tall enough. No need to turn the soil over (Mother Nature didn't intend that anyway). I add a bag of lime (for 1000sqft) each year to counteract the acid from all the compost. The mulch keeps the soil moisture relatively constant in summer and provides food for the plants as it decays. Weeding takes about an hour a week so most of the work is picking the vegetables.

John

Tim Clarke
04-01-2009, 08:31 PM
Never forget the barter system. I swap grapes to my neighbor for tomatoes, he lovingly raises the best tomatoes, and he loves my grapes.

TC

MickeyD
04-01-2009, 08:36 PM
Plant some yellow squash and onions. The onions are super easy and fresh tastes 10x better than store bought, and a couple of squash plants will feed a family of 4 for a couple of months if you keep the bugs off (seven dust works wonders there). I plant a bunch of tomatoes, squash, onions, and peppers and usually give half away to neighbors because fresh veggies make up for some of the crap I put them through with my machinery habits.

Evan
04-01-2009, 08:55 PM
(seven dust works wonders there



Material Safety Data Sheet

MSDS Number: 102000001927
SEVIN® XLR CARBARYL INSECTICIDE LIQUID
SUSPENSION
MSDS Version 2.1

Ingestion

Harmful if swallowed. This product causes reversible cholinesterase inhibition.
Repeated overexposure may cause more severe cholinesterase inhibition with
more pronounced symptoms. May lead to rapid onset of nausea, vomiting,
diarrhea, abdominal pain, involuntary shaking, excess salivation, pinpoint pupils, blurred vision, profuse sweating, temporary paralysis, respiratory depression, and convulsions.

(note: These are the same symptoms as from exposure to nerve gas. That is not a coincidence.)

Inhalation

Harmful if inhaled. Do not breathe vapours or spray mist. May produce symptoms similar to those from ingestion.

Chronic or Delayed Long-Term

This product is not listed by NTP, IARC or regulated as a carcinogen by OSHA.
This product or its components may have target organ effects.

Medical Conditions Aggravated by Exposure

Inhalation of product may aggravate existing chronic respiratory problems such as asthma, emphysema or bronchitis. Skin contact may aggravate existing skin disease.

Potential Environmental Effect

Highly toxic to bees. Extremely toxic to aquatic and estuarine invertebrates.


Sevin is a neurotoxin. It is a component of some nerve gas formulations. I personally think that all such pesticides should be taken off the market for sale to the general public. They should only be available for sale to a trained and licensed applicator and even then there are some such as Sevin that shouldn't be used at all. It kills pollinators on contact and is highly toxic to all type of aquatic life. It is a sterilant type of poison as it can kill any type of life form.

dhammer
04-01-2009, 09:48 PM
Just finished supper..home grown squash , tomato and kale soup with a couple of pork chops the neighbor raised. Can't be beat. Oh yeah..home made corn bread.

What you grow depends on your zone..if you live in the southern states you can grown pretty much whatever you like. Green beans are pretty much fool proof..even in Minnesota we always get a crop. Kale is another fool proof vegetable..so are collards, beets and onions. Your biggest problem will probably be insects. I don't like to use chemicals so I use floating row covers..kind of expensive but works well. Evan's advice on spuds is mostly right on..spuds usually can be found for cheap and those damn potato bugs are hard to control.

gaget builders advice on mulch is good..good for the soil, keeps weeds down and helps conserve water.

Planting is fun, weeding is satisfying but putting your produce by is a lot of hard work..freezing, canning etc.

WE doubled the size of our garden this year..our goal is to be self sufficient in vegetables.

wierdscience
04-01-2009, 10:07 PM
Zucchini is easy,if you can't grow that give up.In the kind of weather we have down here if it rains in the afternoon,go out and pick the Zucchini,if not by morning it will be ball bat sized:)

Yellow squash is also easy,just keep it a row or two away from the Zucchini,some of it will cross breed with less than spectacular results.

G90 corn is good,sweet potatos,they climb even on fences.Field peas,they will feed you and feed the soil too.

When I plant corn I add in a few acorn and butternut squash in the rows.The corn gives them shade and the squash vines keep the weeds down once the corn is up above knee level.

Your Old Dog
04-01-2009, 10:08 PM
They got an ad on TV about the hanging garden and I think that's what we're going to do. Going to take some 5 gallon bucket, drill about 4 3" holes in the side, fill them with dirt and plant vine type plants in the holes.

The hurdle was keeping the plants from getting scarred on the rough edge of the hole but I got that problem licked. I'll take some plastic type tubing from the hardware and slit it half way through lengthwise and put it around the rough edge of the hole.

We are thinking of tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and any other viney plants we can think of. Plan to mount about 4 or 5 buckets about 6 feet off the ground frow pipe structure. This means no bugs from teh ground getting on it and much easier to tend as no bending over.

One tip I heard that worked for me was when planting tomatoes to always plant three different species. The bugs will choose which one to devour and leave the others alone. We planted 6 plants each of three diffferent spieces of tomatoes and one entire row of the same spiecies got absolutly trashed with bugs and worms. The other 12 plants were perfect even though they were right next to the bad ones?

Another tip was to put a few match heads into the hole with your pepper seeds as they like plenty of sulphur.

Here's one more. When your tomatoe plants start to blum, mix up a gallon of water to two tablespoons of common old time remedy for soaking your feet in, Epsom Salts from the drug store. This will "harden off" the blums and not make them so susceptible to wind and driving rain drops. If they fall off, you get no fruit. It works

barts
04-01-2009, 10:13 PM
One trick that works well is to plant when a wall will reflect sun onto the plant; we had tomatoes until it froze (December) one year in San Jose, CA. Use mulch to cut down on weeding; if you have old manure that will help as well.

JCHannum
04-01-2009, 10:29 PM
Don't forget to stagger your planting. If you plant two dozen tomato plants today, they will all come ripe at the same time. It is better to plant a couple plants every week or so. Same for most other vegetables.

jclem40c
04-01-2009, 10:34 PM
Grew up in New York State on a truck farm (vegtables and such)in the40's&50's sprayed the crops with DDT and the likes and I'm 62 and gaining. Dad quit farming in '65 and I never had no kind of sickness until pop quit farming. Bought all this new food with preservitives after that and started getting colds, flu and the likes after that. Take me back to the old way and I would be happier and healther for it. Raw milk, fresh veggies & real work makes you a much better person.

Evan
04-01-2009, 10:48 PM
DDT isn't particularly toxic to humans. It was banned because it caused all kinds of birds to fail to produce eggs with thick enough shells for the chicks to survive. If we had continued to use it it would have wiped out the top birds in the food chain, mostly the raptors such as the eagles and falcons.

patty boy
04-01-2009, 11:55 PM
A few points:

The better the soil, the better the garden. If you have compost, spread it uniformly over the soil and spade it in. Rototilling is not used by good gardeners, nor many farmers. Leaving the soil undisturbed seems to produce better plants.

Use mulch -- anything to cover the ground that lets water and air through it. Straw is good, old hay is better, old vegetation works. Mulch helps the ground retain water. It's not essential, but it sure helps.

If the soil has produced well in the past, and you've left old organic material on it over the winter, it probably won't need any fertilizer. If you judge that the soil is poor, use Miracle Grow as a fertilizer, applying it according to the label. Other commercial fertilizers will also work if you know what and how much to apply. Most gardens are over fertilized. Incorporating organic material into the soil is an almost fool proof way of improving the soil. Putting a fish in a hole by each corn plant probably works, but it's hell on the fish. (If you're inclined to use fish, spray on fish emulsion fertilizer. Your neighbors (and your family) will wince when they smell the results, but plants do well with it.)

Consult your local garden supply store to see if you need to adjust the pH of you soil. Most western soils are alkaline, most east/wet areas are acidic. Many garden plants will tolerate both kinds of soil unless they are extreme. But the better the soil matches the plant, the better the production.

Tomatoes and peppers like long hot summers. So do potatoes. We planted five tomato plants last year in excellent eastern Washington soil where we have long, hot, sunny days. We ate from them all summer and still harvested about 20 gallons of tomatoes at the end of the season. These we froze whole. (Great for soups and stews, but worthless for slicing as they turn to mush when thawed.) By the way, determinate tomatoes die at the end of the season, indeterminate ones will live over if not frozen.

Good advice was given earlier; decide what veggies you want to grow, then visit your garden supply store and ask them what grows well in your area. Try to find a privately-owned store; the employees at Home Depot, Wal Mart, etc, usually don't know beans from baloney, let alone gardening.

Good luck, and let us know your results.

v860rich
04-02-2009, 12:29 AM
Grew up in New York State on a truck farm (vegtables and such)in the40's&50's sprayed the crops with DDT and the likes and I'm 62 and gaining. Dad quit farming in '65 and I never had no kind of sickness until pop quit farming. Bought all this new food with preservitives after that and started getting colds, flu and the likes after that. Take me back to the old way and I would be happier and healther for it. Raw milk, fresh veggies & real work makes you a much better person.
I agree with this 100% too bad it was banned. We now use sevin on any plants we grow. It is also used in the chicken nests and pens to cut out mites on the birds. I guess I'd better find some tiny gas masks for those chicks.
THANX RICH


People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

wtrueman
04-02-2009, 01:02 AM
David: Over here, if you have access to starfish, put one at the base of each tomato as you transplant it. These supposidly contain all the nutrients a tomato plant needs. BTW: I use a tweezer to put each tomato seed in a small plastic yogurt cup already stuffed with the following. My soil mix is easy: about one third each sand, vermiculite, and soil. Stir well, keep warm, not hot, transplant in about 6 weeks. Good luck; your neighbors will be envious. There is a lot more suggestions, I'm sure, to follow. If you decide to go to raised bed gardens, don't go more than three feet wide as you can't easily reach to weed. Wayne

gmatov
04-02-2009, 01:24 AM
David Cofer,

If she brought home Sweet 100 cherry tomato, be advised that those plants will grow almost forever in size. Record is 57 feet long. When I grew them, when I cut the grass weekly, I would pick up the vines stretched outside the garden itself and pile them atop the posts. Really made for a mass of vines.

ALL of those vines produced fruit. I'd estimate that I got gallons of fruit from each vine. Some of the sweetest, tastiest tomatoes you can imagine.

For REAL tomatoes, see if tou can find "Delicious". Heirloom. I think they are even better than the Sweet 100. That, too, is a record holder. Largest ever was 7 pounds 12 ounces. I have had them up to 3 pounds, but I am not a record seeking grower. The guy who grew that one measured his fruit daily, pruned his plant of all but the largest, made a hammock from panty hose to cradle them, and sold his Champion to a seed company for a reported 100 thousand bucks.

Staggering your tomatoes, I don't know. What I DO know is that one year i planted 9 dozen, 3 each of 60, 70, 80 day, assuming they would ripen in order. They did not. I was swamped in tomatoes. Canned a mess of them, tried an old method that is supposed to keep them till January or longer, bury them in salt, salt, tomatoes, more salt. Might be plausible, but didn't work for me. Lots of salty rotten tomato juice on the floor before I gave that up.

If you wind up with tons of leftover tomatoes, make sauce from them. Almost everybody eats spaghetti at home on a weekly basis. So, buy a tomato juicer and grind them up. A tip, I think your wife, if not you, will resent standing over a stove stirring a 5 gallon pot of seasoned juice stirring to keep it from scorching and soiling the outcome.

Big roasters full of juice in the oven will reduce the juice to sauce thickness with no effort at all. Probably better to season after it is reduced. You can make better sauce, because you are seasoning to your taste, than any commercial sauce.

I grow tomatoes, peppers, hot and sweet, basil, cukes, zukes, but I like the little round ones, acorn squash, because my kids like them, eggplant, sometimes, because I like them breaded and fried.

My garden has been smaller these past few years since I crippled up my back. Tiller weighs 450 pounds. ROTOTILLER. The Graham-Paige model built in 1946. Digs out 2 inch roots if you hit them.

Daughter wants to put in a big garden this year. S'inlaw rented a bouncer, one of them front tine things, last year. Told him I'd have to get the G-P running, let him dig a real garden. I can't handle the machine. If he wants to use it, he'll have to dig mine first.

'Nother thing you should buy if you do want to freeze stuff is buy a vacuum sealer. Take all the air out of the package and it will keep better and take up less space in the freezer. Peas, beans, corn, etc, just suck the bag empty. Liquids like sauce, you have to fill, freeze, then vacuum. Air space in a package is what gives room for the freezer to suck the moisture from your produce to "freezer burn" your stuff. Like keeping a box of pierogi too long. Dough dries out so much it will never cook.

And, if there is any air in that package, it will oxidize, go rancid.
These machines are available for 50 bucks and up.

I'm in your corner as far as growing your own food.

An aside, about 5 years ago, I was in the garden with my then about 1 year old g'son. May 31 B'day, so 14 or so months old. Pulling weeds, etc,. the boy wants to pick everything. I gotta tell him "no-no". Turn my back to do something, look back, hot pepper about 2 inches long missing the tip, and the boy chewing happily.

He was lots of help picking cherry tomatoes. One for you, three for me. He put more of them in his belly than he did in my bag. All them that had cracks in them, and they do tend to, he gave me to eat.

My youngest, April 15 b'day, about 15 mos at the time would sit outside the garden and happily munch green onions. Today, she will not eat raw onions. Go figure. I should amend that. Scallion, wrapped in a slice of dried beef slathered with cream cheese is one of her favorite hors d'ouvers.

People are funny. One of my s'inlaws can't stand cream cheese, but he scoffs them up, too. Hell, I don't get to take any home when I make a bunch of them.

Oh, by the way, David. You should have your onion sets in the ground, by now. You'll have scallions in a month or less. If you let them grow, you should get maybe 30 pounds per pound of sets, and if you air dry them for a month or so, they will last you all winter. If you pull them and bag them, expect them to rot at least as fast as them you buy from the store. I throw away about half the onions I buy, because they rot or sprout so much they are unusable.

Garlic, you are too late. Should have been in either late last year or early this year. They like to have a snow cover. Still will grow, but not all that well.

Ah, well.

Cheers,

George

Evan
04-02-2009, 03:59 AM
I agree with this 100% too bad it was banned.

If everybody thought the same it would be entirely appropriate for the US to have an extinct bird as it's symbol.

Your Old Dog
04-02-2009, 05:28 AM
If everybody thought the same it would be entirely appropriate for the US to have an extinct bird as it's symbol.

If that were the case, some might actually that would be appropriate considering where the country has gone and is headed.

lwalker
04-02-2009, 06:19 AM
I don't think you'll have rabbit problems. My German Shepherd is good at killing/eating baby bunnies. No baby rabbits->no adult rabbits!

I somewhat agree with not bothering to plant stuff that's cheap/easy to buy, but there are many exceptions. Tomatoes the obvious ones: much better home grown. I love tomato sauces, but the only raw tomatoes I can stomach are the heirloom grape varieties that are extremely sweet.

I grow potatoes. Growing them in the chicken pen eliminates potato bugs (and makes eggs tastier :-) and provides fertilizer. Have to protect the plants until they're big enough that the chickens don't pull them up. There is a definite improvement in texture over store bought and I think they taste a little better.

One thing I didn't see in the responses was salad greens & carrots, both easy to grow and in your climate you should probably get lettuce started now before it gets too hot. Carrots fresh from the dirt are fantastic. So is a salad made with fresh lettuce & cukes. Used to grow raspberries & strawberries at the last house and will do so again this year. Strawberries right off the vine are amazing. Need good bird protection, though.

Ken Gastineau
04-02-2009, 07:07 AM
I've had good luck with the square foot gardening method. My beds are actually on top of cement. I made the gardening mixture from equal proportions of compost, peat moss, and vermiculite. No tilling and easy to take care of. Works much better than dirt or potting soil.

I was amazed at how well my tomatoes and basil did. I do have to fertilize as I do not have a large source of rich materials to compost.

Ken Gastineau

speedy
04-02-2009, 07:34 AM
Esther Deans' book got me into the no dig gardening. Easy on the body, less work and more sensible IMO.
Convert an old bath into a worm farm for the household scraps.
Last season I got some free fish carcasses from Grumpies. The idea was to chop them up with the spade but that was far from a success. Wearing fish guts etc ain't much joy. So I planted some of them 300+mm deep into the garden with a sprinkling of lime. The rest I left in the covered container for another day.
Two sunny days later I planted the rest. Now that was hard yakka; trying to keep my stomach down:) . See, lesson learnt, some things need to be done straight away.
I will do it again. When the plant roots hit that nourishment they respond well.
When you plant out your tomato plants add a tablespoon of flowers of sulphur and one of milk powder. No blossom end rot or much chance of fungi.
All I use on my garden plants is natural liquid fish fertilizer, worm tea from the 'farm' and copper spray when required.

Here is a small intro to Esthers method of gardening
http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s867068.htm

davidh
04-02-2009, 08:17 AM
geeesh, all this great talk about gardens, gets me excited. . . then i look out the window at the 6 or so inches of fresh "heart attack" snow.

going back to bed.................................

Dawai
04-02-2009, 08:56 AM
Tomatos.. sauces.. mixes.. I got two flats of canning jars I bought last year.

Doc's salsa..

six an one half pounds tomatos diced
large bunch scallions chopped
Large white onion, diced
3 tablespoons salt
3 tablespoons black pepper
3 tablespoons lawrys seasoning salt
clove garlic chopped fine
1 can 22 oz(or less to cool down) pickled jalepeno peppers. We normally use 1/3rd can
First day of mix, it tastes salty, then the tomatos absorb it. After a week or so, it gets hotter. THIS is fresh uncooked salsa, do not leave it on the table. OK? not many bugs like the acidic pepper juice, but.. tomatos go rancid. They break down anyways in the acid.

Doc says this will cure the sniffles, common cold, and has caused a remission in homosexuality.. one of his co-workers started dating girls after eating a bowl..

Stir a tablespoon into some eggs and fry them. Be ready for something good.

Stir a tablespoon onto a burrito from Taco bell.

good with chips, shredded chicken or?? Beans.. ohh.. stir some into your cornbread mix.. NONE of that Northern SWEET Cornbread thou.. (ya'll northerners)

Thanks guys.. I am still reading.. Zuchini and green onions (scallions) was things I had not considered.. squash will go into the back yard.. Hell, I may go get some chickens here in a bit.. we throw out food scraps.. I got a dog kennel we don't use.. that fat bastich sleeps in the bed..

Dawai
04-02-2009, 09:06 AM
DavidH:

Poverty has struck the south.. Lil brother has been looking for a house-shop. Some bargains? a home on 2 acres sold for $15,000..

My mom's place on 8 acres, three rental trailers, a two story house was appraised at $60,000.. what is wrong with that picture.. If I had not put so much time into the home I am in.. This one I have built with my hands? it is on the side of a ridge thou on 2 acres.. if you start rolling you may not stop till you are in a neighbors yard.. It'll never flood here.. I can see the mountains I love so dearly and watch the sun rise over them daily.

THIS is the time to buy another home if you want to snow-bird.. maybe not all the way into florida, them people have went insane there.. hurricanes and crime..

J Tiers
04-02-2009, 09:11 AM
The simplest answer is that you plant what you like to eat, and emphasize those things that you have more trouble getting, or which are expensive, but which will grow there.

The alternate is to go for preservable stuff, or cash crops if you have land.

Depends if the garden is really for feeding you, or if it is for supplements. My grandma fed herself off three city lots, one of which had the house on it. Corn, vegetables, and a few fruit trees, some squash, etc.

The start of any garden is dirt. Dirt with a goodly amount of organic material in it, but not too much. Too much good plant food leads to less production of fruit... Fine for leaf vegetables, maybe, (not always) but not good for tomatos.

We eat salsa in summer, so we grow tomatos, peppers, tomatillos, mostly. I like garlic/pepper sandwiches, so I grow "giant marconi" peppers that get to be 8 inches long.....one pepper, two sandwiches. Raspberries also, which don't grow well this far south, but we get $4 per pint crops for "free"......and we like them, being from north.

The best area for a garden to prevent critters is out well into the open... some destructive little critters like squirrels won't come out there if you have any hawks, and even deer tend to miss the garden if it isn't in one of their regular routes.

Evan
04-02-2009, 10:09 AM
As a child I spent most of the summers sleeping on a cot in a sleeping bag in my garden. It was I that tilled it and planted it and I would be damned if I was going to let the deer eat it. Every night I went to sleep staring at the stars. In California in the late 50s the air was clear and the skies were dark. It never rains in summer there. That is how I came to love astronomy.

BillH
04-02-2009, 10:17 AM
My dad was really big into gardening, had many veggies, then one day he got a tick bite... Doctors didn't know back then...

davidfe
04-02-2009, 03:50 PM
David,

Check with the County Extension Service and the GA College that is the
agricultural college.

Both will have literature and answer any questions you have. Their
information is appropriate for you state.

Good luck.

davidfe
04-02-2009, 03:53 PM
I've had good luck with the square foot gardening method. My beds are actually on top of cement. I made the gardening mixture from equal proportions of compost, peat moss, and vermiculite. No tilling and easy to take care of. Works much better than dirt or potting soil.

I was amazed at how well my tomatoes and basil did. I do have to fertilize as I do not have a large source of rich materials to compost.

Ken Gastineau

Square foot gardening is a lot of fun. It is even better if you use raised beds.

I did that for several years in NJ at the beginning of this decade.

Get the book from the library or www.alibris.com (http://www.alibris.com)

David

davidfe
04-02-2009, 03:59 PM
Paper Pot Maker

http://www.selections.com/images/products/picture1/GF988.jpg (http://www.selections.com/images/products/picture1zoom/GF988.jpg)

Use scroogle.com and do a search for the title.

Egg cartons would be OK only if thery are paper. Just
cut them apart after the seeling are ready to plant.

No need to remove them from the egg cartons. The
paper is bio-degradable.

The paper pots are made from old newspaper.

They work great. Made thousand each winter
for all the ex wanted to use to start exotic / unusual
seeds.

David

garyphansen
04-02-2009, 04:18 PM
I have not planted a garden for 15 years, since the local deer developed a taste for tomatos. Deer had walked through the garden for years with out messing with the tomatos but that years they ate all the tomatos and even the vines. I ate one of the deer that ate my tomatos that fall when bow season opened up.

This year I plan on trying to grow some upside down tomatos up on my deck. The plan is to drill a hole in the bottom of a 5 gal bucket to stick the vine of a tomato seedling through, then filling the bucket half up with soil. Then the bucket is hung up by the handle. The advantages are, no weeding, all the water gos in the bucket and is used for the plant, no tomato worms, and the tomatos are up off the ground so they do not rot. Gary P. Hansen

Dawai
04-02-2009, 07:22 PM
We are now discussing the hanging tomato plants.. OF course I am too cheap to do it their way on tele..

On every fence post? a Mator bucket?

wierdscience
04-02-2009, 07:42 PM
David,I start up five or six slices of bacon in a skillet,when it's near cooked I add in five or six sliced yellow and zucchini squash,cover and smother down until it's starting to caramelize.Then I add a big jar of Pace salsa,goes good along with toasted French bread.

Same dish can be made with shrimp added,dam,now I am hungry:)

garyphansen
04-02-2009, 07:58 PM
Mr Cofer what is a Mator bucket? I get my 5 gal buckets from Burger King for a buck apiece. Pickles come in them. Gary P. Hansen

J Tiers
04-02-2009, 10:34 PM
The in-laws did that hanging bucket thing....... it rained really hard, and every one of those plants slid out and landed on the ground.....

If you can COUNT your tomato plants, you don't have enough......I don't, don't have room. Plant some early types, and some later ones. Down that far south, you want the hot weather types, a lot of the ones from up in the snow won't set fruit down there. They won't here when it's 95 deg.

Actually, if you want a good harvest, you should have some plants right now. It's too cold outside, gonna freeze again in a couple days here, but I have a bunch of plants down on the starting rack.... some of the tomatos are a few inches tall. I got started late, or there might be some "early girl" blooming in the pots now.

Peppers for sure..... they take a while, so get 'em started under glass or inside early.

Dawai
04-03-2009, 12:28 AM
Ah'm so far south, we are getting a freeze warning for Tuesday.. Bummer.. I done planted some seed.. I will cover it up.. it is a light freeze, 29 degrees..

My egg carton Tomato plants have not sprouted yet. I been talking to them, misting them with water..

I did plant apple seeds and three rose bush cuttings too today.

Teenage_Machinist
04-03-2009, 01:22 AM
My family has a garden. We grow tomatoes and make our own spaghetti sauce. We grow a whole bunch every year and we never have enough.

tattoomike68
04-03-2009, 01:51 AM
Sweet 100 cherry tomatoes will go hog wild, they do real good.

Zucchini will go crazy too, one I grew 10 hills with 3 plants each and that was bad, I had tons of Zucchini . I had to pick them small or get a truck to haul them all off.

Lemon cucumbers are nice, they are smaller and still produce alot. train them up a fence easy.

us folks need to all grow some food at home, you cant go wronge trying.

Oh dont buy anything that says "Miracle grow" if you do, use it at 10%-20% what the darn box says.

gmatov
04-03-2009, 03:20 AM
Mike,

And does any tomato taste better? A GOOD tomato, you gotta slice, bite it. A Sweet 100, you pop it in your mouth, bite, and you got a flood of flavor.
Exquisite.

And what plant is more prolific, I don't know. I love them, BUT, the grape tomato has taken over the market, the elongated specie. Do not taste anywhere as good, BUT, they do sell for more in the stores.

My choice is the cherry. Does anybody grow "arugula", the green that Obama was dicked over about in I think it was Iowa?

That is the jack the price up for endive and escarole, or even dandelion.; And, yes, all them Iowans DID grow "arugula" and got better money for it than for dandelion or endive. Pennies per pound, of course, but stores could double the price for an exotically named green.

Go dig dandelions in the spring. Right now is probably the best time. Last year, on April 23 I picked about 4 pounds of dandelion blossoms to make wine from. Have 4 gals ready to bottle. Couple weeks I have to go pick another 6 or more pounds to make more. Months ago I sampled it, and damn, it is a kick in the ass. What it is like now, I don't know. Have to bottle soon, need the carboy.

Surely have as bit left over after the last bottle is filled. Will sample and report on the result.

My other wines, which my kids asked me why in the world would you make so much, are all but gone. Only made about 130 bottles last season. Kids ask me to bring a couple each holiday, so I am running out.

I drink more beer than wine, else I would be all out.

That is another suggestion. Grape vines. Crush and squeeze. That would make a good return on your investment in labor. Wines are anywhere from 2 to 50 bucks a bottle, and more. If you make 6 gallons of a wine you like, you have 30 bottles, near 300 bucks in value.

If you don't drink, you got juice, at nothing a gallon, less labor, and you'd pay at least 5 bucks a gallon for reconstituted from concentrate.

Grow a garden, if you can. Nothing tastes as good as just picked, else Green Giant and the like would not spend millions to tell you HOW fresh their product is. THEIR product was picked and canned last Fall. 6 months old, today. Picked and frozen LAST Fall. 6 months old today.

Gotta get the machine running, today, get the boy to dig my garden before he takes it home.. Everything that leaves my place becomes somebody elses property. I don't mind. I gotta get them kids to start taking stuff home.

Cheers,

George

lynnl
04-03-2009, 04:37 AM
David, nobody mentioned okra. As a good southern boy I'm sure you must like okra. And it's one of the most prolific garden vegatables you can plant.
Just pick it every day and it'll keep producing like crazy. Fry it, stew it, pickle it, make a gumbo. Great for adding body and texture to soups and stews. Heck, you could probably bake a cake with it! :D

But no need to hurry about planting it. It won't do anything til the weather gets hot anyway. In fact if you plant it too early, the seeds will just rot before the soil gets warm enough to germinate them.

A.K. Boomer
04-03-2009, 10:00 AM
Any advice, bury fish with it? poke a hole in the ground with a stick like the old indians did??







I wouldnt bury fish with it, we had a creek that would dry up and all these sucker fish would get stranded in a deep part --- I speared a bunch and buried them under my pot plants (we had 70 acre's and I grew a little happy weed at the far end of it one year) The plants did take off -- but then a raccoon or possum came in and uprooted them --- My Dad was the one who actually told me about it at the dinner table -- I still dont know if it was just his way of giving me a heads up to what happened to my plants without "getting involved" Or if he really didnt know they were mine and was just striking up conversation ---- but it went something like this;
"I was out walking at the edge of the property today and it almost looks like someone was trying to grow some margiewanna and someone or something got ahold of the plants" --------- My Mom;;; "really - on our edge" Dad; "Yup --- right on the far west side next to the Helgars cornfield" --- Mom; "I dont know if I like that" Me; "Who around here would do a think like that? -- you sure it was dope Dad" Dad; "im pretty sure but im no expert" Me; "These biscuits are sure good Mom where did you buy them" Mom; "You know I dont buy biscuits -- I made them from scratch" Me; "you sure can cook Mom" Mom; "why thank you son"
Me; "whew (but not outloud) that was close",,,

Next morning I went out to harvest all the plants before it was too late -- got them the rest of the way out of the ground and hung them upside down to dry so all the mind boggling THC drains from the root into the leaves --- It was good stuff for just a hillbilly kid and his first attempt.

My Dad was the ZEN master of gardening --- he always had a huge one,
I tried a vegetable one once and didnt do to hot but might try again soon....

garyphansen
04-03-2009, 01:20 PM
We have 6" of snow on the ground here. Can't plant a garden around here till around the end of May and that is pushing it some years. I have seen 6" of new snow here of the 5th of may. (All that Global Warming, you know!) Gary P. Hansen

davidfe
04-03-2009, 01:23 PM
No one has mentioned onions. Lots of varieties.

Easy to plant,, harvest etc.

Dawai
04-03-2009, 01:51 PM
Aye.. ya are making me cry.. onions..

I dearly love to cut them up in everything, high in natural sugars..

Green onions.. I hope they turn out better than the strawberries.. they run off down the hill. really.. now probably in the neighbors yard.. each offshoot went downhill a tad further..

Gary: my sister in law lives up there in MI.. lake effect snow? she is a good christian woman who holds her tongue when I tell her how warm it is.. (not always.. sometimes colder here)

tattoomike68
04-03-2009, 05:41 PM
Here I am in front of some 13.5 foot sunflowers.

http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f24/snoopdog6502/13footers.jpg

Too_Many_Tools
04-04-2009, 01:08 AM
Don't bother planting things that are always available and cheap to buy. Potatos usually fall in that category. On the other hand tomatos are usually fairly expensive. Where you live a good tomato patch can be an annual crop. A lot of people don't know that tomatos will grow year over year as long as they don't get frozen. Those peppers you have will take a long time to produce, they are a late season crop. Zuchinni is a super fast and easy plant to grow and a couple of plants will give you enough zukes to make bread and still have fresh veggies. Pumpkin is always good if you like pumpkin pie but it's one of those crops that is usually too cheap to bother with.

All the cabbage family are easy to grow but you have to watch out for the European Cabbage Looper larvae. They can be controlled using BTK organic pesticide. Buy the smallest amount you can find and then culture your own in skim milk. It's a bacterium that is totally harmless except to the lepidoptra family.

I like beans and peas. Nothing tastes better than fresh off the vine green peas in butter. For the maximum food value in terms of essential amino acids you cannot beat beans of any type combined with corn. You can't live on either one alone but when you combine beans and corn they together contain all the essential amino acids that meat contains. You can eat a perfectly healthy vegetarian diet if it includes enough beans and corn.

One of the best ways to cut food costs is to eat little to no meat.

The next is to NOT eat out...ever.

The final is to prepare all your food...the more prepared the food you buy, the more it costs.

Do all three for a month and you will be amazed at the money saved.

TMT

J Tiers
04-04-2009, 01:25 AM
I like beans and peas. Nothing tastes better than fresh off the vine green peas in butter. For the maximum food value in terms of essential amino acids you cannot beat beans of any type combined with corn. You can't live on either one alone but when you combine beans and corn they together contain all the essential amino acids that meat contains. You can eat a perfectly healthy vegetarian diet if it includes enough beans and corn.

Or lentils and brown rice....... add red cabbage, onions, oregano and cayenne pepper when you cook them, and grate some cheese on top..... it's very good.

I ate vegetarian for years, when I was single and never knew when I would be home for dinner.

When I went to give blood, they checked the blood density and commented "you must eat a lot of red meat'..... usually freaked them when I said "no, I'm a vegetarian"......

We still don't eat much meat, hardly any at home. Sure reduces the food bill.

Evan
04-04-2009, 02:04 AM
If you eat a true vegan diet with no animal products at all then you need to watch out for vitamin B12 deficiency. It takes a very long time to show up because your liver can store enough to last for several years. Also, if you are eating a lot of greens then you will be getting plenty of folacin. The problem with that is if you have a diet high in folacin it will mask a B12 deficiency so that you don't suffer from the anemia that you normally would. This is not a good thing though. A masked deficiency of B12 will eventually lead to irreversible neurological damage starting with neuropathy in the extremeties such as tingling and numbness in the hands and feet.

There are some non animal sources of B12 such as brewer's yeast but it has been shown that it isn't well absorbed. You really need some sort of animal products like eggs in order to be sure of getting enough B12.

Teenage_Machinist
04-04-2009, 12:59 PM
Also, beef production is a big contributor to global warming. Pork or chicken, not nearly as much...


Do talk to a nutritionist if you are going vegetarian. Its perfectly fine, just not what you evolved for and so you need to be careful about B12 and others.


My family cooks all our own stuff. We buy a lot of things at the farmer's market. And we grow a lot of things too. Including arugula, which we generally grow by accident.

Dawai
04-04-2009, 08:34 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v85/ibewgypsie/DavidTilling4-4-09.jpg

Doc said, this tiller ain't worth bringing to you, everything is locked up.. I worked on "that" engine on it till the dripping gas tank and flames coming out around the head kinda worried me.. this is the engine off my pocket bike, still unfinished.. Ran it for two hours.. Lost the bolt for the air cleaner.. but she churns on. New pulley, new belt.. and about two hours working on the other engine.

BillH
04-04-2009, 08:37 PM
Also, beef production is a big contributor to global warming. Pork or chicken, not nearly as much...


Do talk to a nutritionist if you are going vegetarian. Its perfectly fine, just not what you evolved for and so you need to be careful about B12 and others.


My family cooks all our own stuff. We buy a lot of things at the farmer's market. And we grow a lot of things too. Including arugula, which we generally grow by accident.

Al Gore did not invent the Internet, but he DID make up global warming.

wierdscience
04-04-2009, 09:15 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v85/ibewgypsie/DavidTilling4-4-09.jpg

Doc said, this tiller ain't worth bringing to you, everything is locked up.. I worked on "that" engine on it till the dripping gas tank and flames coming out around the head kinda worried me.. this is the engine off my pocket bike, still unfinished.. Ran it for two hours.. Lost the bolt for the air cleaner.. but she churns on. New pulley, new belt.. and about two hours working on the other engine.

David,them are good tillers,that company must have made 50,000,000 of them branded everything from GardenKing to Otasco and Wizard.Nothing fancy,dirt simple I like.

Have you been humming the tune from Green Acres?:)

Dawai
04-05-2009, 08:23 AM
Notice the Smokey mountains in the distance. I love watching the sun rise over them.

Green acres? I was thinking of Zsa Zsa when my wife was bending over in the garden..

So far.. $14 in seed, $10 for a pulley, $4 for a Hoe, $12 for a belt and some labor. THE hoe is the one thing that may not last a year. THE handle looks like some kinda weak wood and the head looks to be stuck on with glue..

Your Old Dog
04-05-2009, 09:33 AM
$4.00 for a who'e is a bargain. Up in these parts about $20.00 is the cheapest you can get and then you don't know what you're going to bring home with you.

Your Old Dog
04-05-2009, 09:38 AM
Here I am in front of some 13.5 foot sunflowers.

http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f24/snoopdog6502/13footers.jpg

So how do you smoke sunflowers and what do they do for you?

Evan
04-05-2009, 11:02 AM
http://ixian.ca/pics6/hoe.jpg

Orrin
04-05-2009, 05:56 PM
My best advice is to get a planting guide. Mine was printed by the US Department of Agriculture about 40-years ago.

The one I have consists of a US map showing frost-free zones. It then lists all the common vegetables and gives their best planting date, according to the frost free-zone number.

If you follow this guide, I will almost guarantee success.

Many people who figure themselves to be good gardeners will wait until the weather is warmed up, nicely, then plant their whole garden, all at once. They don't stop to think that some plants are better suited to cool weather and some prefer heat.

Once-upon-a-time we lived in Idaho Falls where the elevation is 4,700 feet. The growing season is short! But, we had the best garden in the neighborhood; we planted everything according to its relationship to the frost-free date.

For instance, peas can be planted as soon as the soil can be worked; so, that's what we did. One year we had good soil conditions in March, so that's when the peas went into the ground. Then, a month or two later we got a cold snap and snow.

A rather loudmouthed neighbor lady accused, "What are you going to do now that you've got that seed in the ground?" I paid her no attention. Peas like cold weather. Eventually, we had a bumper crop. Meanwhile, her late-planted peas succumbed to the bugs that thrive in warm weather.

One more thing. If you have the space, grow winter squash. It stores well in a cool, dry place. Varieties such as butternut are delicious. It's a great alternative to spuds.

Orrin

Dawai
04-05-2009, 09:32 PM
Yeah..

I got most everything sprouting out in egg cartons.. BUT.. THE zuchini is in the ground.. a cool day, then two freezing nights.. possible snow trace amount..

TWO envelopes seeds possible loss here and a hour work.. I got plastic bags over the mounds and rocks-dirt on that.. when it warms back up I'll hopefully flip them off..

*or, nature is flipping me off?? HA.. ohh well..

EDIT: without jumping back to top..
NEXT DAY after freezing weather, mid 70s here.. we got sprouts.. 1/4" growth in a hour, really, you can see the plants move.
I AM AMAZED.. now hunting milk jugs to cover them up in case we get another frost.. I used plastic bags and dirt day before yesterday.. what a birthday present.. I am excited as you may guess as a newborns father.

Dawai
05-04-2009, 08:43 AM
http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v3335/204/30/1298124187/n1298124187_30121469_120507.jpg
Second zuchini planting, these are a week old. I was amazed to see the seeds "pop" out of the ground on a stalk, then the seed husk pop off and leaves unfold like a satellite solar collectors.

Ok guys.. this is my first garden. Laugh, go ahead, but these plants getting the 4+" of rain this weekend are growing like The plant in "lil shop of Horrors".. I keep advising the dog not to get too close or it might snab him..

http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v3335/204/30/1298124187/n1298124187_30121468_7028417.jpg
Experiment? the 5 gallon bucket with ONE tomato plant has a hole cut in the center, all the rain goes to the center and drains in around the plant. I was planning on turning it upside down when the root ball is established. It is larger than the plants in the ground. THESE plants have changed green shades because of all the rain.

Cucumbers, squash, zuchini love the excessive rain, the peppers, tomatos and green pepper plants are kinda stunted. Possible root growth? I can't see underground.

We have 8 mounds of zuchini planted, reading on the net 2-3 are enough. One lady had 14 bushels of zuchini she was trying to give away from 10 mounds.

I have poison ivy so bad I can't put on long pants. Up the backs of my legs. Breaking out in red spots all over. Benadryl makes me sleep all day long.

garyphansen
05-04-2009, 01:26 PM
"I have poison ivy so bad I can't put on long pants. Up the backs of my legs. Breaking out in red spots all over. Benadryl makes me sleep all day long."

David: I have not been to a Doctor in twenty years but the last I went was to get a shot of some thing for poison ivy and it cleared it right up. You should go. Gary P. Hansen

Dawai
05-05-2009, 10:43 AM
Gary each time I go to the doctor, instead of addressing my ills, they want to daily tranquilize me.

THE bucket garden? Next year I am going to accumulate more buckets. THE lids with the hole in the middle, well it drains more water naturally, it keeps from having to weed. I was wanting to invert one or two of them, but am not sure now.
The growth in the bucket plants are far more than in the garden.

I think shaking the dirt out into a wheelbarrow each year and adding in manure would create a nutrient rich growing media for near nothing.. not a lot of back breaking tilling or hoe-ing.. Plus starting growth in a egg carton from seed, then moving to the bucket? easy done.

Sources for buckets? Lowes has them for $5 each, lid is more. Where do you find the 5 gallon variety?

Tinkerer
05-05-2009, 12:22 PM
Dave find some IvaRest... it's a thick paste that will knock it down pdq. First wipe with Alcohol and apply IrvaRest works like a dream. Also place a add on craigslist for some goat manure I'm sure you'll get it free... it's not as hot as cow and can be laid on the soil as a mulch... and it does not reek in the heat. You have a nice start there... now all you need is a few chicken say a half a dozen layers and some cornish rocks for the grill and you'll be feeling healthier in no time.

garyphansen
05-05-2009, 12:30 PM
I have got 5 gal pickle buckets from Buger King for $1.00 each with lids. Gary P. Hansen

Dawai
05-05-2009, 12:43 PM
Thanks for the tip.

We have a lil chinese lady friend who sends Handfulls of fortune cookies to our over weight dog. I'll ask her.

She has had the cutest lil baby, now a american citizen. She works hard, the restaurant is booming now and she has underlings. She treats us with much respect and I adore eating there.

Possibly I can give her some of the overload of zuchini I know is coming too.

Norman Atkinson
05-05-2009, 01:31 PM
Well, David, what about the odd date palm tree?
We have two. The first was a baby and my wife planted it with the roots in the septic tank. It is now far taller than the villa in Spain and the dates are- no, we don't eat them!

It's case of getting one's own back.

At home in the UK, my father grew tomatoes and the mix they were watered with was a bag of pigeon manure and soot from the chimney. Until my mother fell in the tank.

Probably the best crop is spinach beet. Spinach and poached eggs? Well, I'm closing up to 79. And look what it did for Popeye.

Dates? These are probably an acquired taste. Mind you Spanish tomatoes are grown in the fields- and watered from the 'gully- gully man' who empties the septic tanks.

There's a quotation in the Bible-- and lo, he stinketh( john11.39)

Another is from 'I Claudius' and Romans 1-- Let all the poisons that lurk in the mud, hatch out. Oh, and Livia did spread the dates with poison.

Happy eating!

Norm

camdigger
05-05-2009, 02:55 PM
Sources for buckets? Lowes has them for $5 each, lid is more. Where do you find the 5 gallon variety?

5 gallon/20 liter buckets can be obtained from a variety of sources. Everything including laundry soap, drywall compound, weed spray, motor oil, lube oils, cooking oil, oilwell drilling fluid additives, industrial detergent... and more... comes in buckets/pails.

Check out restaurants, dairies (both the cow kind and the ice cream plant kind), farms (beware that the containers are properly decontaminated), ask the neighbors (costco sold laundry soap in buckets at one time, and may still do so), food plants, breweries (CIP detergents), possibly even hospitals from either the kitchen or house keeping/laundry, the neighborhood heavy duty shop (hydraulic, motor, and lube oil buckets).

Dawai
05-05-2009, 10:31 PM
Looking out the north windows at the overgrown rental yard next door? A HERD of rabbits running toward my property.. Really. I called the wife over to see it, she saw 4 alternating standing up and hopping in the tall grass.

I put the 100lb bulldog onto them, of course he was needing oxygen by the time he ran one around the back yard. He was excited.

A feral cat ran across the road. Probably he had them rabbits on the move.

I looked to the front yard one night about two am, there was a dozen rabbit eyes shining in the front yard in the IR camera's illumination.

Your Old Dog
05-06-2009, 06:19 AM
We are now discussing the hanging tomato plants.. OF course I am too cheap to do it their way on tele..

On every fence post? a Mator bucket?

Not a bad idea at all. Home Depot has galvanized hardware used in making decks that would be perfect to bolt to the bottom of a bucket and then slide over a 4x4 fence post. It should be pretty secure. I'm getting a new driveway put in so will have a spot out of the way and in the sun to do my 2" pipe cloths hanger thing for my buckets. May even put it on large casters so I can roll it into the barn when really ugly weather brews up.

edited to add: I just saw your cyclone fence! Thought you had traditional wood with post. Forget I said anyting :D

Peter.
05-06-2009, 07:11 AM
One thing I didn't see in the responses was salad greens & carrots, both easy to grow and in your climate you should probably get lettuce started now before it gets too hot. Carrots fresh from the dirt are fantastic. So is a salad made with fresh lettuce & cukes. Used to grow raspberries & strawberries at the last house and will do so again this year. Strawberries right off the vine are amazing. Need good bird protection, though.

There's some parasite or other over here that attacks carrots. The cure is to grow them in a 40gallon drum, apparently they can't get higher than 2' off the ground so they can't get into the drum.

speedy
05-06-2009, 07:18 AM
Sources for buckets? Lowes has them for $5 each, lid is more. Where do you find the 5 gallon variety?
Dave, I get my free 20litre pails(with lids) from the local plasterer. They usually have some plaster mix left in them but that is easy, if a little bother, to remove.

Dawai
05-06-2009, 07:38 AM
Upside down tomatoe?

Okay... I have a Tidy-Cat litter container that is a 2-3 gallon bottle, has a lid about two inches in diameter.

I sliced the bottom in a flap inside the curves and left the strength of the edges, folded it back, filled it up with manure and dirt, then folded it back down and taped it shut. I have a mator plant rooting in it's open bottle cap. When a root ball is established I will invert it after wrapping the stem in wet newspaper. THE tomato tree bag uses foam to retain the roots..

DURING the six inches of rain here this week, if I had inverted it too soon? it'd be on the ground.
Where did all this stinking rain come from? is it heaven's big joke on David Cofer?

I am wanting a custom HOE.. hoe on one side, two or three prong tine on other, a FOLDING tine that lays against the handle till I pull a lever then it becomes a grabber.. All in stainless steel, wooden handle. Snake handler, soda can picker upper, root and rock grabber, weed chopper, tine is for tilling. AND get this, it must be light as a feather.

Swarf&Sparks
05-06-2009, 01:13 PM
David, you gonna have surplus tomatoes!
(everybody does)

Don't worry about sauce or freezing, sun dry em.

Just google, there's a gazillion ways and recipes out there.
Store em in jars of olive oil with the herbs/spices/chillies you've grown.

Has anybody mentioned growing tobacco yet? Is it still legal there? ;)

Dawai
05-06-2009, 01:55 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Tgnl6gOnew&feature=pyv&ad=2652400465&gclid=CICji7ufqJoCFRYiagodQBQj1w

A shrub buster, a fulcrum, base and pole. Neato. I got poison ivy-sumac by taking a bush axe and crawling under the shrubs. Still suffering with it, my doctor is out of town till Monday.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QFPqn-Gx4Y&NR=1 Oven drying tomatoes..

rockrat
05-06-2009, 09:38 PM
Looking out the north windows at the overgrown rental yard next door? A HERD of rabbits running toward my property.. Really. I called the wife over to see it, she saw 4 alternating standing up and hopping in the tall grass.

I'll tell you this, we have rabbits again after the fox left and I'll be having rabbit soup soon. I have the same bb gun that my g-maw gave me for x-mass one year. I load it with pellets. Quiet, and effective.

And them things (rabbits) keep coming! So I say plant not only what rabbits eat, but what you want to eat with them!

I bought a drill press off a guy who was raising chuckars. Made me wish I lived where I could raise them and pheasant.

As for your thread, I am all encouraged on starting a garden now. I'm off to check the growing season to see if I have missed the window for Ohio yet. Thanks buddy, one more project to work on. :)

rock~

Dawai
05-07-2009, 07:20 AM
THE 5 gallon bucket garden is the way to go, no tilling no bending over weeding.

THE single plant in the middle of the bucket, hole in the lid to keep the tomatoes off the dirt. No weeding to do. If you had the proper lift arrangement you could work on them on a table.

The largest, healthiest tomato plant here is in a bucket. I started all my crap from seed, if you want a garden, I suggest larger healthier plants already started by a green house.

See pruning tips for tomatoes on youtube. Picking all the extra sucker leaves off the stalk. Every stem that does not have a flower is like pruning apple trees for larger apples.

ANYONE remember a thing called a "phototron"????
http://www.phototron.com/images/products/Photo-8-9.jpg
It was for growing pot, took up the corner of a room like a curio cabinet, had flourescent lights in the corners of a grow chamber.. Some of these tomato plants grow two or three years. I was never rich enough to buy toys like that when I was interested in that.


(I started all my crap from seed)!!!! Okay.. garden envy?? My neighbor put in greenhouse tomato starts.. his is 12-18" tall, mine are all 4-6" tall.. He drives by looking at my garden, blows the horn and just waves.. if he was smiling? I'd be throwing rocks.. his harley is shinier-faster-newer-paid off and mine is a old rattle trap, His woman is younger and skinnier, has bigger boobs?? (he don have a harley, and his wife looks like my granny did).. Just I feel insecure about this.. My first garden and I am obsessive compulsive.

john hobdeclipe
05-09-2009, 06:40 PM
Just finished off a plate of onion rings...pulled the onions out of the ground only about 2 hours ago!

We've fought with this sterile clay for 4 years now. Last year I shoveled in about 6 or so yards of old, ripe, well done barnyard manure from a local horse rescue operation. What a difference!

Dawai
05-09-2009, 08:57 PM
http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs014.snc1/4210_1057215232789_1298124187_30125242_6588521_n.j pg
Barb's tomatoes.. she is on the same climate line as me, but west about a hundred miles.

My tomatoes still look like the grass that dog is standing next to.. I feel so humiliated. Aww.. and I danced around the plants last night in the full moon hoeing with the fancy stainless hoe..
http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v2680/118/114/1052243483/n1052243483_30393504_5182604.jpg
My maters..

My granny was like that, everything she touched jumped to glory. Grampa came in one day limping on a walking stick, she propped her rose bush up on it and it took root.. he'd walked 25 miles on it..

BUT them zuchinnis?? they are acting like the plant in lil shop of horrors.. last night after I was out there at midnight, another leaf sprouted out on them all.. by moonlight..

davidfe
05-09-2009, 09:20 PM
Cofer,

Did you plant any carrots?

What else ya got planted?

Dawai
05-09-2009, 11:19 PM
http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs037.snc1/4338_1137621154691_1052243483_30395311_5228901_n.j pg
These sprouted another set of leaves Last night under the moon.. zuchinni.. We got 11 plants in the ground.
http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v2680/118/114/1052243483/n1052243483_30393504_5182604.jpg
27 of these big boy tomatoes are growing, three don't look so good.. stunted.. Raised from seed in egg cartons and transplanted after frost date, per your instructions Dave..
http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v2680/118/114/1052243483/n1052243483_30393501_4944720.jpg
Got eight yellow crook neck squash planted. four in the clay in the back yard and four in the black manure dirt in the front.
http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs024.snc1/3103_1133834460026_1052243483_30384232_7616651_n.j pg
Banana peppers, I think two, two cayenne pepper plants.. and also, 28 Bell pepper plants still so tiny I lose them.. hatched from seed also in egg cartons before frost was over.

Not much else growing here.. my first garden.
I been playing with this design.. Nothing revolutionary or anything.. just a hoe, going to add a grabber to it.. another post on that tho.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BH7_wCAslH4

I left out the pickle cucumbers.. I think we got four hills of them.. we planted a row of green onions for the salsa recipe.. not seen any yet.. and pickling peppers.. still so tiny a ladybug can hide them..

Mike Burdick
05-10-2009, 12:39 AM
David,

Your garden is looking good! Are you planting any watermelon, cantaloupe, or honeydew? I usually plant about three acres of melons and place them far enough apart so I can cultivate them with the tractor. The patch is open to the public and they can take what they want. Some people are even kind enough to hoe the weeds close to the plants that I can't get with the tractor. I've been doing this for about 25 years now. I also plant about an acre of pumpkins for the kids.

How about sweet corn, are you planting any? They now have varieties that are so good. If one loves butter, corn on the cob is the best delivery system there is! Zucchini is another good butter delivery system...with salt and a good amount of fresh cracked pepper, it can't be beat!:)

Dawai
05-10-2009, 07:13 AM
Mike? Acres??? I got square feet..

Front patch is 20x50' (mostly 30 tomatos) w #11 mounds 4x50' across fence for zuchinnis. four feet per hill. I got bell peppers stuck in here and there. Some will get covered by the zuchinnis if they get 4 feet across as told. I don't know, but they are the most aggressive thing I have ever saw planted. Sprouting a new leaf daily it seems. Might be all the rain recently?? THE third leaf to sprout is as big as my hand now. It sprouted by the full moon, does that make a difference??

Back patch is #4 mounds 4x20 cucumbers and 8x20'. peppers and #4 mounds yellow crook neck squash. It's red clay back there and much slower, thou the peppers seem to like it.

Things I had to mark with a big rock? *not to weed them? bell peppers, pickling peppers, green onions (not sprouted yet, second planting).. so small..?? a ladybug could cut them and carry them off. The cherry tomatoes in the back yard are tiny too.

Some sparrows nested above my door.. sitting watching the sunrise? the momma bird is feeding them every 90 seconds.. or does both parent birds feed the babies? Meaning a worm is gone from the tilled earth every 90 seconds.. I want to build bird houses now.

Tilling, I got ahold of a tiller w/bad engine, rusty all over.. took the motor off my pocket bike I had hanging in the ceiling, stuck it on there, got a belt from tractor supply after tilling twice, got a load of manure on the one ton after building it from a wrecker into a dump truck in a week, planted before the frost, replanted after the frost w seedlings started in egg cartons after a few people told me of my error. I lost the zuchinni hills and the green onions. Carried the tomatoes inside and out each day during the bright sunshine. I bet they have as many miles as my harley does this year so far.. ha..

My spots are so small, I can hoe it in half a hour. I live in a poor community, only have a couple acres here. This ground have been turned over so many times over it's life with dozer work, the cow manure I tilled in was probably the first time anyone has "gave back" to the soil. Perhaps it will not do too well this year? or? enough to look promising? It is a new experience for me. THE cow manure had straw or hay in it, I showed up with shovels and needed hayforks to load. Each bump on the straw has erupted in a green weed shoot.. kinda funny in a way.

I think I want to till in Chicken manure in the fall.. let it roast all winter?? is that a good idea? I was told it was too "hot" for plants. Poo is free for the labor.

Evan
05-10-2009, 07:43 AM
David, an individual zuchinni fruit will grow to dang near 4 feet almost overnight if you let it. You are going to be up to your hips in zuchinnis before very long. .

We are still waiting to plant here. We can't plant until June at the soonest. Even then there is the chance of being frosted out any day of the year. I have had my garden killed dead in the beginning of August by temperatures of -10 C. That isn't usual but it happens.

We haven't bothered with a garden for years but with the price of fresh produce so high we will put one in this year. Our well water is harder than granite and so doesn't do the plants much good. I just put up another rain water storage tank with some decent capcity to water the garden. It's an old 180 gallon water pressure tank, had a pinhole that I brazed up. It's already full from a couple of thunderstorms this week.

http://ixian.ca/pics6/tank.jpg

Dawai
05-10-2009, 08:05 AM
Evan:

The plants seem to like rain water better than hose watering? or does it just give more than I do? Does the chlorine affect the growth?

Yeah, thought you'd be a master of upside down tomatoes in a window. Or a phototron?

Things other people take for granted are new to me. I should've paid attention to grampa and his garden instead of chasing high maintenance women.

A local disabled policeman, he was wanting a topsy turvy planter.. he has terminal cancer. THE police department throwed him away when he was near retirement.
I am sending him the tomato that looks so good in the 5 gallon bucket. I have one plant in the middle growing up through a one and half inch hole in middle of the lid. I am searching for buckets.. next year I am digging woods dirt to fill them. FOR a small growth, I think them buckets will do better than all the tilling and weeding work.. easier to feed manure too without it washing away all the nutrients in the over-rainfall. Dump it into a wheelbarrow and add manure, then spoon it back into the bucket and get on with it.

Sprouting tomatoes next year? Plastic Dixie cups instead of egg cartons.. I gave away sixty plants.. most people replanted them into larger containers.. I stuck mine in the earth. Right after DavidFE told me it was safe.. April 19th here.. last frost date.. normally.. TOSS the dice huh?

That Barb.. she has green tomatoes.. I am so jealous. I wonder if she made them out of copper?

Evan
05-10-2009, 09:24 AM
Something you can do with the zillions of zuchs you are gonna have. Round up a bunch before they are more than 4 or 6 inches long and make pickled zuchinni.

Lots of recipes online.

http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q=pickled+zuchinni&btnG=Google+Search&meta=&aq=o&oq=

Dawai
05-10-2009, 09:42 AM
I plan on taking the homeless shelter some zuchinis if I am blessed with too many.

Fire ants.. well I can send a shovel full to anyone who does not know what they are.. I just got ate up again. Flip flops and shorts in the garden with the shiny HOE.

IF I take David the one tomatoe plant, will it make fruit.. does the plants have both sexes of flowers?? Carrol just asked me that.

keelan
05-10-2009, 12:19 PM
A lot of people don't know that tomatos will grow year over year as long as they don't get frozen.

Evan,

Don't you live in Williams Lake? Isn't it still snowing there? :D

agrip
05-10-2009, 12:38 PM
The flowers are unisex
Inside the bloom notice a cage surrounding a stem.
EDIT You have to wait for cage bars to bow (bo) open.
Pollen grows on cage, needs to be on stem, (in appropriate quantity and ripeness.)

If you lightly vibrate the flower stem with a "hunky" stick or a wooden pencil at the right time you will pollenate your tomatoes the more pollen transferred the more seeds and meatier the tomatoes.

Early to mid morning when dew is on the mountain is a good time.

Give em the good vibes two - three times (four- five is ok) in early full spread.
once maybe twice a day is enough.

Tomato sandwiches ummm uuum good

Dawai
05-10-2009, 05:06 PM
Thanks AG:

Okay.. squash bugs.. I was told this morning by a cook to spray the plants once a week with a dawn dish soap dilute mix.. then rinse. They said in our zone they were killing zucchini plants right and left..

I watched them kill bees with the same stuff on youtube. It smothers the bug.
Opinions? should I try one plant if anything starts chewing on my plants??

OldRedFord
05-11-2009, 03:39 AM
What choices would be good to plant that would be "goose proof"?

Your Old Dog
05-11-2009, 06:22 AM
........28 Bell pepper plants still so tiny I lose them.. hatched from seed also in egg cartons before frost was over.

Peppers like sulphur. I had some going all summer and they got to be the size of my thumb. My dad said to plant they with a couple of match heads for sulphur.

Evan
05-11-2009, 06:24 AM
You could plant belladonna or bleeding heart, pretty flowers but if the geese eat them they will be dead ducks. :D

Or you could plant oleander shrubs. They are very common in the southern parts of the US. It is an incredibly toxic plant. 2 small leaves will kill a horse and using an oleander stem to skewer a shishkabob can kill a human.

Best bet to help keep pests out of the garden is to plant marigolds in and around the veggies. They look nice and they also repel quite a few types of pests.

Evan
05-11-2009, 06:36 AM
Yeah, thought you'd be a master of upside down tomatoes in a window. Or a phototron?


Years ago in the early 80's I built a computer controlled greenhouse. It was 8' x 8' with an insulated north wall and a ton of gravel under the floor as a heat sink. It had automated cooling fans and louvers in the top of the back wall and the bottom of the front windows. The plants (tomatos) sat on racks facing south and were planted in a vermiculite gravel mix. I used an automated nutrient drip system to dispense premixed feed solution to each individual plant. The green house also had temperature controlled infrared chicken brood lamps that heated the plants directly in the early and late season.

The first year we harvested something between 100 to 200 lbs of tomatos, all of excellent quality.

Dawai
05-11-2009, 07:21 AM
We have a whole herd of rabbits. I have a hav-a-hart trap I use on cats. I think it will work on rabbits if I can figure out how to get them in it. Geese are better eating than rabbit.

Also, the pitt bulldog, he stepped on one or two plants. BUT you can tell him to go look out the window, and he will run outside if something is in the yard-garden.

Evan, I kinda figured you for a auto-greenhouse. Considering where ya was from and all.. you see the "emerald triangle" show recently? Has Made Arnie consider legislation to legalize.

EDIT: Okay.. I am just mad now. I hatched out the pickling peppers in egg cartons too. Then carrying them in and outside each day, I moved the plants to a garden row. ABOUT HALF them pepper plants looks like "yard grass". My wife plucked a couple and showed me. NOW how the heck did that happen with the sterile potting soil I used from a bag. I am going to let them grow up and see if the grass makes peppers.. I love pickled peppers, banana peppers.. Makes me angry. Was it bad seed like the show "Secondhand Lions"? I'll make a rack if I can get caught up to sprout seed for next year, a plastic cover and a light like Butche's old dog house.. I probably plucked the peppers from the cartons. (what makes me mad) thinking them shoots didn't look like the others.

http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs052.snc1/4473_1057782566972_1298124187_30126562_1436267_n.j pg
Note, all the wrinkles are not out of them leave yet, you can see the thing moving. Compare to
http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs033.snc1/3244_1056999867405_1298124187_30124944_6891501_n.j pg
No reference size in photo , sorry.. TRUST me, it has doubled in size or more in a week.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLO7IxKwruc

keelan
05-12-2009, 12:35 AM
Years ago in the early 80's I built a computer controlled greenhouse. It was 8' x 8' with an insulated north wall and a ton of gravel under the floor as a heat sink. It had automated cooling fans and louvers in the top of the back wall and the bottom of the front windows. The plants (tomatos) sat on racks facing south and were planted in a vermiculite gravel mix. I used an automated nutrient drip system to dispense premixed feed solution to each individual plant. The green house also had temperature controlled infrared chicken brood lamps that heated the plants directly in the early and late season.

Sure... tomatos. That's what everyone grows here in BC. That's why we're known around the world for our tomatos.

Evan
05-12-2009, 12:41 AM
I don't do grass, it gives me tachycardia. Not at all a comfortable sensation and at my age now not safe either.

It was tomatos.

dp
05-12-2009, 01:39 AM
Things I'm aware of that are easy to grow at home are potatoes, tomatoes, carrots, onions, any of the squash, sweet potatoes, beans and peas, corn, and if you have room, quinoa. Watermelon and in fact many melons grow well at home. Pumpkins are especially good food and good eating.

The advantage of quinoa is it is a whole protein food like soybeans, and while largely ugly little things, they are quite good in tomato sauces with noodles or over chicken or potatoes with cheese and green onions. If you can make a good rue then quinoa gumbo with crawfish is very good as is a nice Étouffée with crab or shrimp. Being a whole protein it is a meat substitute but shrimp or crawfish adds a really welcome flavor. Don't expect to have a lot of guests show up for a quinoa bbq, though. Canada is a big quinoa supplier.

If you live on a large lake or freshwater billabong or some such then wild rice is absolutely excellent.

Dawai
05-12-2009, 07:01 AM
Dennis, Glad you are feeling better.

Evan:
it gives me tachycardia. Insanity gives me tachycardia, I used to see the young ladies completely naked in my tattoo shop. Not bother me a bit, but if they bent over in a skirt picking something up? Tachycardia.

WE had to spray the tomatoes with a solution of Dawn dish soap and water last night. They are getting lil holes in them, tiny black bugs that fly off when you approach the plant. I sprayed the zucchini too.

THE zucchini are all standing up off the ground this morning. THOSE things are amazing, another set of leave buds have sprouted between the major stems. THE first set of leaves are still the same size. THE second set are still unwrinkling and spreading, now six inches wide.

Evan
05-12-2009, 10:57 AM
Quinoa (pronounced keen-waah) is an excellent gluten free substitute for wheat. I used to grind my own into flour back before gluten intolerance became "fashionable". It makes good donuts which is really hard to do without wheat flour. Only problem with them is day old quinoa donuts can be used as hockey pucks.

Dawai
05-12-2009, 01:57 PM
The bugs eating my tomatoes are about the size of a sweat bee, solid black, with wings like a fly.

I am researching what to do next. Any clues?

Evan
05-12-2009, 02:10 PM
Don't know David. Here is our garden this morning, almost ready to plant...:rolleyes:

http://ixian.ca/pics6/garden.jpg

agrip
05-12-2009, 02:59 PM
Dave
Suspect Potato/ Tomato Flea Beetles particularly if the leaf holes are roundish.
http://www.attra.org/attra-pub/tomato.html#table3

Evan
Those appear to be clumped, hexagonally spined winter white drifters.
They wont eat much, they just seem to sit around and disappear when the sun shines. But they can be certainly disappointing when they appear in May.

Ag

Dawai
05-12-2009, 06:26 PM
http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v4473/204/30/1298124187/n1298124187_30127672_978862.jpg

Do I need sevin dust? 5,7 or 10????

I am freaking out. THou the spot is small I have invested a lot of heart and soul.. We raised these in egg cartons.. Only to feed them to critters??

The dawn and water did squat.. nothing.. coveys of the lil black flies in front of me out there..

Dawai
05-12-2009, 06:32 PM
Dang Evan: if my balance had been working today I'd gotten the harley out. Beautiful sunshine with a repeat day tomorrow.

I cut a truck bed end I chopped off the dump truck, 31" long.. it is going to be a table in the shop.. flat enough, heavy enough to make my cnc gantry on. All them parts laying on the bed in the guest room can go to work now, the backpanel I built last winter laying on the "shortened" bed-bench here.. (headboard-footboard made into a bench).
Anyways.. I felt pretty good till about two.. danged this getting old crapola..

AND dang the snow for you..

I have a plan, something else to work with and on, and for.. put all them expensive parts to use..
Don't know how that will help my tomatoes thou.

Evan
05-12-2009, 07:21 PM
Don't use Sevin David. It's an extreme neurotoxin and you don't want that on your food. Go get some insecticidal soap instead of the Dawn. Follow the instructions. You can also use Rotenone, an organic pesticide made from a tropical tree root. Some of the most powerful toxins are plant toxins but they also have the property of being quickly biodegradable unlike many synthetic petroleum based pesticides. Citronella will repel a lot of flying insects if you can stand the scent.

You can make a powerful natural insect and fly repellant by mixing orange oil (d-limonene), a few drops of soap, some ethyl alcohol and water (vodka) and spritzing this on the plants. Or, if you like oranges take some orange rinds and squeeze them so the nearly invisible spray drifts onto the plants.

gmatov
05-13-2009, 12:35 AM
Hot pepper oil is supposed to be a deterrent, too. I just did a quick search for Oil of Capsicum, and it can be expensive.

Above, I THINK I read spray soapy water on the plants then rinse them. Why would you want to WASH them? You want to make them taste bad to deer or whatever else is eating your plants. If you're going to SOAP them, hell's bells, DON'T rinse them.

Potato bugs, from Rodale Press many years ago, collect a cup or so of the bugs, put them in a blender with enough water to make them sprayable.

Supposedly the bug's guts have pathogens that will kill all the other bugs still ON the plants.

I would suggest you buy a cheap blender to keep in the garage for this purpose.
Rodale Press, again, a lady named Ruth Stout preached "no till" gardening.

Cover your garden with 6 or more inches of hay or straw. Make a hole in it, set your plant, cover with the mulch.

I have never tried it. My daughter DOES want to try some spuds. I gave her half a sack of sprouted ones, and advised her to lay them out and cover with a bunch of hay they have.

I have NO idea if that will work. I have grown potatoes ONCE, and they looked good, till the date for harvest. Almost nothing.

I don't know what I did. My Dad, an old coal miner, grew all of our foods, less meats.

But I DO like tomatos and peppers fresh from the garden. Cukes help a salad, too, and onions make it all complete.

I wish I could get my garden done in the fall so I could get in some garlic. Love it. Pickle it in vinegar and balsamic vinegar and eat it like candy.

Too late to put it in, now.

Cheers,

George

Dawai
05-13-2009, 07:01 AM
Well I am depressed pretty bad this morning, the tomato plants are all dying.

THE one good one, was in a bucket. I just loaded it into the car to send to the disabled policeman.
It's stem is the size of my thumb, standing up strong and green.

The ones in the ground are sickly, spots on the leaves, color shade changing to pale. Holes all in the leaves. Perhaps it is some kind of blight? I could see bugs eating a few.

When the sun comes up later I will get a picture. and edit in here. Right now I am going to drink my coffee..

The zucchini is standing up again, waving in the breeze, by evening last night it laid down all tired. Plant food? I gave the righthand 4 on the fenceline some compost..

davidfe
05-13-2009, 07:18 AM
Did you put the your suspect "compost" on the problem tomato plants?

Dawai
05-13-2009, 07:44 AM
No. Have not composted the tomatoes.. I did move some bell peppers into the three died stunted holes.

All the bell peppers looks good, except they are a inch tall plants. We reset the ones within a few feet of the zucchinis to the died pickling pepper row.. where I had planted grass.. really.. I sprouted yard grass in the egg cartons and planted it.

You'd think if I was going to grow grass I'd grow hemp at least huh?

Evan
05-13-2009, 08:09 AM
The zucchini is standing up again, waving in the breeze, by evening last night it laid down all tired.

Needs water David.

J Tiers
05-13-2009, 09:18 AM
On that soap bug getter.......

Do use soap.... DO NOT use detergent. soap flakes good, Dawn detergent BAD.

Better yet, use "horticultural insecticidal soap" which is less damaging.

The squash bugs burrow into the stems and kill the plants..... inside the stem the soap won't hurt them, so you need to get them before they bore in.

davidfe
05-13-2009, 10:46 AM
David this is the MSDS sheet on DAWN.

http://www.fsafood.com/msds/vault/000/000592.pdf

Gotta be careful about what you put on plants.

As I suggested before, check with the GA county extension office
for their help. They know their stuff. In fact, you TAXES pay for it,
so take advantage of the resource.

Good luck.

Evan
05-13-2009, 11:32 AM
There is nothing particularly bad about Dawn dish soap. Like nearly all commercial dish and hand washing soaps it is made primarily from sodium lauryl sulphate which is derived from palm oil. The main problem with it is that it isn't particularly effective against insects. There are very many chemical compounds that fall in the category of "soaps". A soap is a molecule that has one end that has an affinity for water and the other for oil. It is capable of forming an emulsion of oil and water that won't separate. That is how soap cleans greasy things. It also lowers the surface tension of water allowing it to penetrate into smaller cracks and crevices.

Insecticidal soaps have these properties as well but are made of chemical compounds that are toxic to the target species. There is one in particular that I recommend called Trounce® made by Safer.


Safer's Trounce®
This highly effective natural, organic insecticide provides broad spectrum control of a variety of insect pests including aphids, whitefly, caterpillars and selected beetles. Unique formulation of naturally derived fatty acids and pyrethrum.



This is very satisfying stuff to use. Even though it is entirely biodegradable and derived directly from natural sources as opposed to synthetically made artificial compounds it acts in seconds on aphids and similar critters. Spray it on and they fall off in droves. Doesn't seem to hurt the birds or the fish in the pond either.

I should point out that there are two competing definitions of the word "organic". For most people the word means that something is "natural" and derived from plants or animals. To the scientist it only means that a chemical compound contains a carbon-hydrogen bond which includes gasoline, crude oil and nearly all pesticides no matter how derived.

What that means is that a manufacturer may legally claim that something is "organic" even if it is synthetically made from bunker C fuel. You can't trust the word "organic" in advertising to mean that something is somehow safer to use. I have done a lot of research over the years into pesticides and which ones are reasonably safe and which ones should be avoided. I didn't want my children to be crawling around on a lawn treated with neurotoxic chemicals such as 2-4-D.

Dawai
05-13-2009, 03:06 PM
http://photos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v4473/204/30/1298124187/n1298124187_30128409_7398240.jpg
Notice how it is trying to nudge my foot out of the way?? it was laying down cause it was sprouting more leaves.. on several of these plants the leaves have popped out and spread..

http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs012.snc1/4473_1058630748176_1298124187_30128410_4737917_n.j pg
http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs052.snc1/4473_1058630828178_1298124187_30128412_4701055_n.j pg

Whole patch has it now.. all the plants.

I actually did go to the shop and worked some this morning. I mounted the 31" wide section I cut off the rear of the dump truck bed on legs, mounted that on a flat cart w/castors, mounted the 5hp hydraulic power pack on that.. one end is clear underneath for 60" so I can mount the gantry unit under the table. I am moving the 10' linear slide I used to use on the tubing bender to the side wall.. going to mount a punch, shear, have it able to feed to the table-bender.. I am demo'ing the small 24x24 roll around bender table. If anyone in the south needs it. It has castors on the front legs so you can wheelbarrow it around.. It'll last a long time outside as a paint mixing table if nobody needs it. END desired result? a plasma cnc open C-type gantry table, welding table, layout table, 2x2 sockets for tooling, and bender table w/indexer and rotator once again. Able to program sequential punched holes in 10' piece or three dimensional bends in tube. Plus after looking at other peoples strap benders I see no need not to build dies for the model three for other types of metal.

Funny thing? the new welding-layout-setup-gantry table has side marker and clearance lights... Perhaps them need to be warning lights when the cnc part is running??


When you see the first signs of tomato flea beetle damage on leaves in your garden, use an insecticide which contains either carbaryl, pyrethrins, methoxychlor, or diazinon to help control these tomato plant pests. Each time new tomato plant growth is affected, or you find further damage to your tomato plants, you will need to repeat the application of the chosen insecticide. You can repeat the insecticide treatment safely every seven days if necessary. Additionally, make sure to clear away all plant debris which can harbor flea beetles insects and eggs which can overwinter in soil surrounding tomato plants or in the plant debris.

NOW, today, it is on the cucumbers, the yellow squash and the cherry tomatoes. I got such a headache now. One Zucchini has holes in the leaves.

Evan
05-13-2009, 05:50 PM
Look under the leaves real close David. You may find some mites clustered on them or even aphids. If you do the Trounce will take care of them real quick. If you have aphids you will find ants tending them. Take care of the ants and the aphids will have a hard time.

speedy
05-13-2009, 08:20 PM
What I use for ants.

ANT BAIT RECIPE

600ml water, 300g sugar, 60g honey, 60g borax, 60g boric acid.

Place into suitable containers with access for the ants :) (to minimise drying out and the danger for pets).
This is far more effective than any commercial one IME:

Does your soil have worms? Perhaps it is lacking in humus and nutrients??
Contaminated from industrial activety??
Plants are like people; if we are not fed correctly we are more prone to illness and much less able to resist attack .
Go organic Dave.

Any books by these two are really worthwhile.
Kay Baxter from NZ
http://www.koanga.co.nz/

Peter Bennett from Aus
http://www.peterbennettorganics.com.au/

Dawai
05-15-2009, 08:08 AM
http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs012.snc1/4473_1059194722275_1298124187_30129612_6891525_n.j pg
5-16-09 note more leaves sprouting. I watered them with a miracle grow hose feeder last night.

http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v4473/204/30/1298124187/n1298124187_30129613_948823.jpg
Looks like a viagra commercial to me. THEY stand up, sometimes at the end of the day, they lay down.

I am not sure I have any tomatoe plants alive.. main reason I was raising a garden to make salsa. Tomatoes normally so expensive here I do without.

Looks like I may have bushels of Zucchini if they keep growing like they have. THE guy down the end of the road here, his tomato plants look like the stakes I put up next to mine.. mine are puny. sickly, his look like a tree farm. He's a good old guy, I could just talk to him I guess. I gave him all my left over seed sprouts.

madman
05-15-2009, 08:23 AM
I have used a 50 50 mixture of isopropal alcohol and water and actually dunked my plants in the mix. It seems to impregnate the egg larvae also and stops them (kills the mites) some people like soap.

gmatov
05-15-2009, 10:55 PM
David,

For the zuchs, if you have any cheap plastic sewer pipe, cut mebbe 3 inch pieces, slit them to be able to put around the stems, tape or tie them shut to keep them worms from the stems.

They are borers. They dig in and head for the roots. They can't climb the smooth plastic.

With all the zuchs you put in, if you get the normal harvest, don't be surprised if even the Food Bank asks you to please quit bringing them. I think 2 hills is about right for an average sized family of 4 or 5.

I don't know when you started your seeds. Should have been maybe the middle of February. Tomatos should have been 8 to 12 inches high when you planted them, and that with a nice thick stem, not a leggy sickly plant. LOTS of good light to keep them from growing to any light they could find.

Egg cartons are in no way big enough to start sets in. Simply not enough soil. Even with enough time to grow your sets they will be small, root bound.

I like styro meat trays from the market, the larger ones. Don't plant too many per each.
If you decide to go with plastic glasses, punch holes in them. You don't want the roots waterlogged.

If you need sulfur, buy a carton of Epsom Salts, add to water and irrigate. I don't KNOW the ratio. I have used a couple tablespoons per gallon without harm OR evidence that it helped.

Cheers,

George

speedy
05-16-2009, 02:10 AM
Dave .
I wrote you on this thread a couple of days back but timed out (didn’t save, bugger!).
So again; this time using Word:) .
I grow my tomato plants from seed in trays. When they have their first real leaves after the cotyledons I prick them out into standard polystyrene cups.
Soil for these is old seed mix with soil, maybe 50/50 with a touch of worm castings.
The cups are modified in this way.—with a hot small tip iron I make 3 holes in the base.
At ½” from the base I make 3 slits ¾ up the side. Then at ¾” from the top lip I make 3 slits ¾ down the side. So in all there are 6 slits equidistant around the cup.
This allows the feeder roots to get good and established. It also air trims(?) the roots. You will be impressed with the root growth.
Line the cups with wet newsprint. I have ripped squares soaking in a bucket ready.

I use plastic lined (cleansacks) banana boxes to contain the cups and enable controlled watering.
I keep these boxes elevated away from the bugs and snails that would destroy my efforts if given the opportunity.
When the plants are well established (maybe 10” tall) I plant them out into prepared holes. Plant them deep so they can withstand draught conditions better; they will produce more roots on the buried stem.
Shake them out into your hand when the cup soil is damp, drop into the holes and firm down.
Make sure that your tomato plants are planted out slightly elevated to avoid wet stems when watering. Avoid overhead watering and water in the morning to minimise fungal attack. Deep water to avoid shallow rooting--
I use thes cups for most all my plants, especially my Dalmation Beans. I grow these untill they are a foot or more tall before planting out. They have never been knocked back by the bugs using this method. When they are planted out too young they get decimated.
I use plastic pipe upstands at 3ft distances to get the water deep. They are maybe 12" into the soil and stand 8" out.

Dawai
05-16-2009, 08:31 AM
George, Speedy, Mike.. I am trying. Feel pretty kicked now.

The tomato plants, I will have maybe three that produce fruit.. another three I will probably chop today.

About the boring bugs getting the roots? After the poisoning insecticide was put on, I dug in a piece of 3" pvc with holes drilled along the plant side, I found dead earthworms. I think I feel bad from that.. earthworms make a nice rain drainage hole to get food and nutrients to the roots. THE pvc pipe I sunk is not around the root ball, it is next to the hill for watering. I saw that for a tree once.. anyways I have too much drainage here, soil dries out. The plants are standing up in the morning after the nightly watering, then lay down in the heat. After watering at night they stand back up.. I am going to mainline water to the roots and bypass the leaves with "shock" of cold water in the sunshine.

THE tomato plant in the bucket I gave away to the dying guy? it was beautiful. NEXT year.. or perhaps a few this year. Wife said she may go get a few started plants. WITH the known dangers and the fact the bucket plant was not affected, well.. they will get buckets.

His wife asked my wife HOW I GOT THAT TOMATO plant through the small hole in the lid?? I laughed when I heard that. No weeding, no hoeing, no mess with a bucket garden.. Next year.. if I can find enough buckets and lids..

I have not learned a thousand ways to "not make a light bulb yet".. so my road may be long still.

Evan
05-16-2009, 09:35 AM
If your plants are wilting in the heat you need to keep them watered more. Wilting is very stressful on the plant and will kill it if it happens often. If it is too hot to keep them watered the put strips of shade cloth fabric over the plants. It allows some light in but keep the direct sun from cooking them and you can use it each year. Black aluminum screening will work too. You can set it up so the the fabric is in strips directly over the plants so they only receive sunlight in the morning and afternoon. It also helps to keep birds from attacking your plants.

http://ixian.ca/pics6/shadecloth.jpg

Dawai
05-17-2009, 08:50 AM
http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v4473/204/30/1298124187/n1298124187_30130864_5055600.jpg
New bucket tomato, transplanted from the garden spot into bucket. Lost some leaves and thought it was going to die just to spite me.

http://photos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v4473/204/30/1298124187/n1298124187_30130865_3208166.jpg
Upside down tomato, CUT a U in bottom of bottle (no way I was going to fill it thru that lil hole),taped it shut and started sprout in open cap right side up, wrapped upholstery foam around the stem, cut a hole in the kitty litter bottle and pulled the smallish plant through it.
We'll see how it does.. It is reaching a U-turn looking for the sun, all stems turned over to face the sun.

http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs012.snc1/4473_1059858058858_1298124187_30130866_5630940_n.j pg
THE one zucchini I been taking pictures of has rolled a couple leaves up. I tried some garden spray on it. I may have killed it, thou it is still green and growing, this one has outpaced it thou.

THEY got enough water last night, we had a few storms pass through.. the pvc pipes sunk in ground next to plants are muddy in the bottom, but no standing water.

THE 4 big plants have a depression dug next to the plant I fill with water.. so far that works better than the pipes.

speedy
05-17-2009, 04:59 PM
Dave, those PVC upstands that I use. At the base of them I drill a number of 3/8" holes, maybe 3 around and up 2 or 3 rows over a distance of 4"(?).
I am lucky here as we have top soil about 18" deep, deeper in some spots. Ancient kahikatea forest swamp peat land surrounds us. One of the last remaining trees is over the next section; she is a beauty!
I also mulch my garden with shredded pea straw to minimise evaporation, keep soil temp a tad higher and it suppresses weeds. Old wool carpet or underfelt lasts a season or two and works OK as well, they both decompose into the soil over time.
Old baths etc make good raised gardens (also worm farms). A post at each corner at whatever height suits. Collect the drained water at the outlet (with nutrients) and tip it back in, no waste.
Off to the powdercoaters now.

Dawai
05-19-2009, 08:22 AM
THE root watering system did not work as thought.. trickle down works better.. Making a small puddle on one side and filling it with water.

THE four zucchinis on the left are twice the size of the ones on the right now with the pvc sunk in the ground. Carrol says they may be growing underground root systems and catch up.

They have doubled in size again over the past few days. I have too much drainage here. Thinking I need to water them three times daily.

Lex the 100lb dog stepped on a cucumber vine and twisted it off at the ground.. Killed it quite dead after me nursing it from seed.

Carrols Cherry tomatoes, the ones I said were only good for slingshot ammo? they are knee high.. she put tomato baskets around them. My big-boy ones in the front patch are pathetic. Mostly dying.

Dawai
05-20-2009, 06:38 PM
http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs092.snc1/4669_1061027368090_1298124187_30133519_1772342_n.j pg

Yep, that is a sevin dusting. Less than a month since planted.. 25 days to be exact.. Bugs are carrying everything off.

gmatov
05-21-2009, 12:05 AM
David,

Once upon a time I was as pissed as you are about bugs.

I found that bugs eating eggplant leaves till they looked like lace did not make them produce less. That is when I quit using Sevin and the like.

I don't use any of them chemicals.

I still don't like potato bugs. I don't like the bugs that get into my apples. I don't like the bugs that put worms in my broccoli, but soak in cold salty water and they drop out.

Have fun making your first garden. You will learn to love it. Don't be so damned negative. NOTHING has a 100% chance at life. A few plants die, BFD, go buy replacements.

The stuff you planted were too young to BE planted. You should have started your seeds in mid-February, with enough light to keep the plants from growing TOO tall, because they can't get any light.

Plants should be short and sturdy, result of enough light.

Cheers,

George

Dawai
05-21-2009, 07:10 AM
George, I gave the wife $10 to pick up some more plants to replace the dying tomatos..

I'll bucket them.. my today job, find and fill buckets with woods dirt. HUMUS and black dirt..

The soil is possibly just too poor here.. drainage is too good.. looking at some of the pictures it looks like gravel in places where the topsoil filters down through the chert.

Hang in there.. I value your opinion highly.. this is my first one and I am trying too hard.. I do enjoy it but dislike the heartbreak, like when the big fat dog stepped on a cucumber plant and killed it..

speedy
05-21-2009, 08:15 AM
It is probably better to start off small in buckets as you are or raised gardens Dave.
Perhaps condition and prepare your larger garden plot while you are learning there.
Here is a couple of links to areas that I use, in conjunction with my books and the little that I know.
The Royal Horticultural Society
https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/problems_archive_total.asp

Wally- a local gardener- southern hemisphere so 6mths out for you.
http://www.eplants.co.nz/what_to_do/wally/Newsletters/2007/Wally_june16_07.htm

Tomato is a good indicator crop; they will react badly to any hint of chemical spray or soil.

Remember that in the garden there is no such thing as a failure; you are learning.
I have been doing homework on a plant that has cropped up in my garage garden. It is the cursed Italian arum. I screened the garden last year but obviously missed some. I do not want to resort to chemical.

Evan
05-21-2009, 08:30 AM
You still have plenty of time to change a few things David. Number one is to get some organic material in that soil. Soil is a base of totally inorganic material, elements like oxides of silicon and hydrated carbon compounds. Plants need organic material, they can't derive what they need from gound up rock. The best organic material is the partially processed remains of .... plants. Of course.

You need to spade in some aged manure, as much as you can get your hands on, so to speak. Nothing fresh, it's too "hot", full of highly reactive nitrogen compounds. The best is dug out of cattle pens when the rancher moves the pens 'cause the sh:t is getting too deep. Ever notice how nothing ever grows in those pens where a lot of animals are kept at once? The stomp it all to death which has the effect of killing all the weeds that would otherwise be included in that rich topsoil. Interesting word, soil. Means both earth and shi:t at the same time.

Prepare a new row or two with as much well aged manure in it as you can. The dig up your smaller plant in one big scoop of a shovel and replant in an equal sized hole in the new row. Dont try to remove any of the dirt from the roots, that will destroy the hair root system which are roots so thin you can't even see them.

Then leave the plant alone except for giving them water. The organic material will absorb water and swell up, keeping the soil moist even in the hottest weather. The plants will grow as fast as the weeds and will withstand insect attacks far better. Don't use those artifical toxins, it just makes the bugs stronger by eliminating the weak ones leaving a population of super bugs.

Farming with artificial chemicals is like using drugs. You quickly become dependent on them and need more and more just to stay even. The companies that sell those products know that just like the pusher knows his junkies will be back tommorow for the next fix.

Dawai
05-21-2009, 01:55 PM
A normal goob would back up after getting whipped up on and his feeling hurt...

well I got five buckets with perilite in the bottom of them, wife is bringing home some more potting soil and manure in a bag.. will divvi it between the buckets. She has a $10 spot to buy a few tomato plants.

I shoo'ed some black flea-beetles off the hanging tomato plant.. I never have dusted it, thought it was safe there five feet off the ground.

Evan
05-21-2009, 03:52 PM
I can tell one thing for sure. You have never had a grow op. :D

Dawai
05-21-2009, 09:22 PM
There's a lot of things I've not done Evan: Some by choice.. I would like to raise about six hundred pounds of some nice Hawaiian.. but.. it's illegal and I don't know how.

I did however plant six more tomato plants today in buckets. (plants cost $3 and $2 each) Bonnie plants, look so healthy, in miracle grow potting soil ($9.50 a bag) over about four inches of perilite. Drilled two 3/8 holes in bottom of buckets.

I told the wife, NO more money on the garden.. if we spend any more it will be to purchase a flat of tomatoes at the farmers market.

DOC had to pay me for the sewing machine, it was a buddy thing.. I blowed the money on plants and a not so good Chinese dinner.

So, I got a old junk tiller, worked on engine for several hours, then put the pocket bike engine on it, $30 for pulley and belt.. About $20 in seed, About $10 in sevin dust, about $15 in Miracle grow feeder hose bib, a trip with the one ton after manure, some pepper plants.. AND mostly a lot of grief.

We got some beautiful knee high cherry tomato plants, some beautiful pepper plants, the bell pepper plants are looking good, thou still tiny.. and about three Big boy tomato plants from seed that might make fruit. The other people I gave the extra sprouts too say they are stunted too??? the starting media??

Need to investigate that more.. NOW peat moss starting pellets is the way I should have done it.. They make trays like that.. I bet they are pricy thou.

Okay, the farmers almanac.. A old woman told me.. if you plant too soon, the bugs as they are hatching out the first after frost, they settle on a locale and food to eat.. if it is your garden of "planted too soon crops"... you lose.. if you wait, they go on, die or move on.. then your plants are safer..

I should have read more about that.. Perhaps next 3am when I can't sleep..

Edit 5-22-09 add pictures:
http://photos-g.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v4669/204/30/1298124187/n1298124187_30135198_7574857.jpg
Okay I figured out how this thing wants to be watered.. check this out... planted in seed 4-25-09.. today 5-22-09
http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs092.snc1/4669_1061532980730_1298124187_30135197_4201136_n.j pg
New store bought tomatoes
http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs092.snc1/4669_1061532940729_1298124187_30135196_7552208_n.j pg
Best big boy tomato raised from seed

http://photos-g.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v4669/204/30/1298124187/n1298124187_30137190_5289452.jpg
She's almost a month old from seed dropped in ground.

Dawai
05-30-2009, 10:02 AM
http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v4669/204/30/1298124187/n1298124187_30142312_7024739.jpg
I got BUDS.. (calm down Mike, they are zucchini buds) Almost 30 days since planting the seed.. Evan might be right.. I need a wheelbarrow to harvest zucchini soon. Ferris Morris said 50 days till harvest can begin?? well if these are buds.. I may be early.

Tomatoes are looking good too.. been picking and pruning them.
http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs092.snc1/4669_1064096564818_1298124187_30142306_6445944_n.j pg
Upside down tomato, a kitty litter bottle, U shaped hole cut in bottom of bottle, folded back, filled with potting soil, taped shut, flipped over, a tomato plant inserted with (harley upholstery) foam around the stem and into bottle, hole cut in lid and threaded over it screwing it shut.. I gave it time to root before inverting it and cutting bottom tape loose..

Seems to be growing same rate as those in the ground.. but weird.. stems flip toward sun.. Look healthy to me.

dp
05-30-2009, 10:20 AM
I wonder if diatomaceous earth would work for your bug problem. It works by jamming itself in the joints of exoskeletal critters. It becomes uncomfortable or crippling to them. You may be sued for cruel treatment of bugs, of course.

Dawai
05-31-2009, 08:25 PM
http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v4669/204/30/1298124187/n1298124187_30144420_5722273.jpg
OUR first lil baby zucchini.. can you tell we are happy?? about three inches long..

Looking up recipes.. I batter fried a bunch this week while Carrol was in Michigan.. Can't tell the difference in yellow or zucchini when it has a corn meal crunch.

GNO
05-31-2009, 08:53 PM
try the blossoms too, resipies on net!!!!!!! :) while I am [typing]:) try some cat tail tops [vegetation kind] pick while green on outside, yellow inside, boil in salted water (not very long) butter, being generously applied,:) & enjoy!!!! you end up with a plate of knitting needles.:)

speedy
05-31-2009, 10:02 PM
OUR first lil baby zucchini.. can you tell we are happy?? about three inches long..
Keep em well fed and watered. Once started you will have to kill it to stop em producing.

Looking up recipes.. I batter fried a bunch this week while Carrol was in Michigan.. Can't tell the difference in yellow or zucchini when it has a corn meal crunch
Eating healthy aye? :)

One pot cooking with single plate, knife and fork. Not too many dishes to worry about after a week of camping alone:D
6 months or so back, when my wife was crook and dependant on me. I was providing the meals but she quickly began to complain about my one pot wonder meals; I thought that they were pretty damn fine examples of an efficient cooking method!

Dawai
06-01-2009, 12:11 AM
I wanna see some tomatoes..
http://photos-g.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs092.snc1/4669_1064741820949_1298124187_30144422_3183437_n.j pg
Her cherry tomatoes.. Ok.. I said they are only good for slingshot ammo.. so they outgrew my big-boy tomatoes.. them have thicker stems thou.

http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs092.snc1/4669_1064741860950_1298124187_30144423_5483266_n.j pg
Upside down tomato planter is kickin.. it has grown inches in the past few days..

Dawai
06-03-2009, 02:08 AM
Dumb question?? OKAY.. I've never done it.. I think I know how??

Do you just cut the zucchini there below the fruit, take it and the blossom off the vine and leave the stump of the vine?? or do you cut it closer to the plant?

I got hundreds of blossoms starting.. I warned the new neighbors that moved into the rental next door.

speedy
06-03-2009, 07:06 AM
I cut ours clean with a sharp knife and leave a piece of stem on the zuch . Same as I do with our pumpkins, butternuts n stuff.
The wife just tears them off...she is rough like that:)

Dawai
06-08-2009, 06:50 AM
http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs104.snc1/4579_1067246243558_1298124187_30151047_2142313_n.j pg
http://photos-g.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs104.snc1/4579_1067246203557_1298124187_30151046_381792_n.jp g
We've had our first meal off these plants, tiny tender zucchini's about six inches long. Made a Parmesan pasta with roasted chicken and zuch.

About 30+ blooms showing on each plant.. about three or more open and yellow..

Someone said I planted too much, but people keep driving by pointing..

speedy
06-08-2009, 07:17 AM
Someone said I planted too much, but people keep driving by pointing..

that crop is looking fine Dave. Maybe look at preserving them? You will still have plenty to share :)
Warm moist climate will promote powdery mildew. If the plants have enough air movement this is less of a problem. I use copper spray and/or milk when needs must..

Dawai
06-08-2009, 11:42 AM
http://photos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs084.snc1/4579_1067246323560_1298124187_30151049_1593619_n.j pg
These are the "runts" I pulled not so kindly from the hill leaving the dominant plant.. they are going to make zucchinis too.

http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs084.snc1/4579_1067246363561_1298124187_30151050_700020_n.jp g
There is one inch long cucumbers behind the flowers on these.. how to keep them from rotting? newspaper?? plastic??

http://photos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs084.snc1/4579_1067246403562_1298124187_30151051_4404435_n.j pg
Moved around the pickling peppers and bell peppers so much I lost track of what is what?? them scallion green onions have sprouted too.

http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs104.snc1/4579_1067246443563_1298124187_30151052_723227_n.jp g
Mators from seed.. all bigboys.. Looking like some of them will make.

I am overall happy with the advice and results.

speedy
06-08-2009, 10:31 PM
There is one inch long cucumbers behind the flowers on these.. how to keep them from rotting? newspaper?? plastic??

Ideally grow them on a slight mound so that water does not pool under the plant/fruit. Those smaller ones could still be elevated, if need be, by judicious use of the shovel. Trench around the plant then lift/lever the whole plant slightly; firm the soil around it then remove the shovel. You should aim to have a couple inches of elevation.
Probably it would be enough to level out the soil a bit to minimise poolin when it rains
Straw would suit, as you do with field grown strawberries. Stops mud slash and all the other benefits, mulch, warmth, drainage etc.
I use pea straw.

Dawai
06-15-2009, 10:33 AM
We ate zucchini for about half a dozen nights.. gave about a large batch night before last, gave away a large basket full to the family down the road last night.

bborr01
06-15-2009, 11:42 AM
Hi David,
I like to grow my cucumbers on a fence. I use 6X6 inch concrete reinforcing mesh because I had some around, but any mesh fence will work. It keeps the cukes off the ground, takes less room and they are way easier to pick.:)

Dawai
06-16-2009, 05:25 PM
http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs118.snc1/4859_1070473604240_1298124187_30158847_2580174_n.j pg

6-16-09 harvest, cut all big ones yesterday, first squash, cut one cucumber, MOved the dog kennel over to the cucumbers in the back yard and tied them to the chain link fence.

Dawai
06-21-2009, 07:57 PM
:( Well.. I over watered, looks like I have killed several of the zucchinis due to root rot??

Any clues how to fix it? none on the net I can filter out of the crapola.. It all deals with potted plants. Any spray or shots?? I stopped watering and letting it all dry out.

The plants are turning yellow, started at one end and now working down the line, went from 1/3rd bushel per night harvest to three zucchinis..

Neighbors just got their mouths set on squash.. Sent the lil kid down here yesterday but my stupid dog ran her off I think acting like a big guard dog?? *we all know better than that..

speedy
06-23-2009, 06:40 PM
Just stabbing here Dave. Dig a narrow trench down either side row of the plants to aid drainage? As I mentioned earlier we grow ours on mounds. Having said that we are fortunate that our soil is free draining loam. Could it be a deficiency? Perhaps you could foliar spray (early morning) organic fertlizer? Get a worm farm operating, the stuff is magic!

tattoomike68
06-23-2009, 06:58 PM
Just stabbing here Dave. Dig a narrow trench down either side row of the plants to aid drainage? As I mentioned earlier we grow ours on mounds. Having said that we are fortunate that our soil is free draining loam. Could it be a deficiency? Perhaps you could foliar spray (early morning) organic fertlizer? Get a worm farm operating, the stuff is magic!

Its dry as a bone here so we grow in shallow pits here. worm farming is always good

Dave you might need a fungicide and an insecticide.

this year im growing everything in topsyturvys and it works great. Im going to hang my gardens from now on.;)

Dawai
06-23-2009, 07:37 PM
The topsvy tomato is not impressing me..

I got it in a kitty litter bottle, I just jammed my fingers down into the top of the bottle and find roots about a inch down from the top.. so.. not enough dirt..

THE 5 gallon buckets I have here have perlite in the bottom.. so not enough dirt in them either..

I am learning.. I tillered a path down beside the dying zucchinis.. some look a lil better now..

THE zuch's over by themselves, the pulls.. they are great.. look dark green.. leaves 18"-2 feet wide.. I suspect a fungicide because of too much watering..

Dawai
06-24-2009, 07:53 AM
http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs105.snc1/5046_1073451998698_1298124187_30166564_3572966_n.j pg
Two plants look like this.. dying..
http://photos-g.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs105.snc1/5046_1073452118701_1298124187_30166566_3441116_n.j pg
Not a anaconda, that is a zucchini gone to seed while I been trying to cure them up.
http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs085.snc1/5046_1073452238704_1298124187_30166568_4083059_n.j pg
These are off by themselves.. the runt pulls.. and pickling cucumbers behind them.. row of pickling peppers and bell peppers.

Dawai
06-24-2009, 07:58 AM
http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs105.snc1/5046_1073452358707_1298124187_30166570_2076636_n.j pg
FOUR feet tall tomato plant with over sixty green tomatoes on it.
http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs105.snc1/5046_1073452078700_1298124187_30166565_5016026_n.j pg
Runt tomato plants, only about two feet tall. That's my 100lb pitt Lex in the garden.. kinda looks lost don't he?
http://photos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs105.snc1/5046_1073452398708_1298124187_30166571_5979399_n.j pg
Upside down tomato only has a few marble sized ones.. the root ball extends to within a inch of the top of the dirt in the bottle.. not enough dirt.. need a bigger container to get bigger.
http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs105.snc1/5046_1072894904771_1298124187_30165237_7428337_n.j pg
I, David, Canned these pickles.. dill, hot water bath cold pack style..


Thanks guys.. I am concerned having so many tomatoes on one plant.. will they ever get big?? I bought canning jars, will pickle them small if not.

This has been a total new experience. I should've listened to Grampa instead of chasing high maintenance big hootered women and riding my motorcycle. Grampa dearly loved to garden.

Dawai
06-24-2009, 08:15 AM
http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs086.snc1/5057_1155519282133_1052243483_30456546_6769059_n.j pg
Wifes refrigerator pickles.. bread and butter style.. and she did a gallon of refrigerator dill pickles in our salsa jar..

THE runt pulls, well I started to discard them but they have outdone the alpha ones.. the big cucumbers in the back yard I just tied up on a fence only have produced a hand full of cucumbers.. the squash is smaller, and the zucchini, the two all alone are larger and taking over the green onions and bell pepper row.. I gave them six feet.. THEY have big foilage but are not producing like the others did.. one or so a day..

davidfe
06-25-2009, 11:16 AM
http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs105.snc1/5046_1073452358707_1298124187_30166570_2076636_n.j pg
FOUR feet tall tomato plant with over sixty green tomatoes on it.
http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs105.snc1/5046_1073452078700_1298124187_30166565_5016026_n.j pg
Runt tomato plants, only about two feet tall. That's my 100lb pitt Lex in the garden.. kinda looks lost don't he?
http://photos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs105.snc1/5046_1073452398708_1298124187_30166571_5979399_n.j pg
Upside down tomato only has a few marble sized ones.. the root ball extends to within a inch of the top of the dirt in the bottle.. not enough dirt.. need a bigger container to get bigger.
http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs105.snc1/5046_1072894904771_1298124187_30165237_7428337_n.j pg
I, David, Canned these pickles.. dill, hot water bath cold pack style..


Thanks guys.. I am concerned having so many tomatoes on one plant.. will they ever get big?? I bought canning jars, will pickle them small if not.

This has been a total new experience. I should've listened to Grampa instead of chasing high maintenance big hootered women and riding my motorcycle. Grampa dearly loved to garden.

Use a real camera please! Too hard on the old eyes! LOL

speedy
06-25-2009, 08:16 PM
.. I am concerned having so many tomatoes on one plant.. will they ever get big?? I bought canning jars, will pickle them small if not.

If they are determinate bush variety then let them go but feed them well and mulch with straw/plastic(?).
If they are indeterminate I would run one main stem or also allow two or three laterals to run. Pinch/cut out all other laterals (in the morning) and dust the wound with a sulphur powder or liquid to prevent disease. When they are at the height you want, pinch out the growing tip/s.
The removed laterals can be planted out for ongoing supply. Allow plenty of air around your plants.
Yesterday I gathered up the leaf fall into large black plastic bags. They will be left out back to break down
The AJS; I still remember that quick run south clearly. And the reward:)

Dawai
06-26-2009, 06:12 AM
As of yesterday, that is 67 green tomatoes on that bushy plant tied to the cut down hog wire fence flattened out.

Most the indeterminate "big boy" tomato plants have only about five or six on it showing, except the cherry tomatoes, it has "racks" of ten or more all over them.. I put them in the back yard so they would not cross pollinate.

I was pruning them So I thought, pinching off the "center" of the limbs.. at the Vee.. that made them grow in several directions on each shoot.

I can not get down the rows for the bushing of the plants.. Carrol says I have to find some "skinny so and so" to harvest them. THE dog broke off some of the lower limbs.. Funny? the upper stalks are about near a inch in diameter, the lower where it goes into the ground about 5/8".

Another lady friend died of brain tumors.. About ten years younger than me. I've lost more than fingers and toes now. Having to show patience in the garden helps me.. I can't rush through it.

gmatov
06-28-2009, 02:20 AM
David,

I don't know what pruning Cherry Tomatoes will do. Sweet 100 variety will grow to 57 feet. If you prune to fit your stake, you may get enough fruit, you may get none.

I always picked up my vines and piled them on top of the vines. LOTS of fruit. Fortunately, I love Cherry tomatoes.

Cheers,

George

Dawai
06-28-2009, 10:01 AM
HI George..

The cherry tomatoes are in the back yard.. My wife's wants. Some are starting to turn orange.

The plant with #68 hanging is a "big boy" plant. Supposedly a large slicing tomato. I was concerned with them cross pollenating with the cherry jobs.

I know little about this whole thing, except we got canning jars full of food for the winter and I have donated a pretty substantial amount to charities and friends.

It has paid off already enough to make the labor and dollars invested worth while. Cheaper tiller, further apart rows, more manure.. read more..

THE pickling peppers are going to be coming in next week, I will can a mess of them with green tomatoes if I have to prune the over-abundance of them off that one plant.. right now they are as hard as wood.. can not squeeze them at all.

(7:30pm edit, after storm)
Well lost most the pickling peppers. the high winds and hail pruned about a dozen tomato plants. The peppers had a pithy, like wood stem that broke off at ground level. The zucchinis are upside down, yellow squash is too.. Cucumbers are unaffected. All the rain will swell up the tiny gurken sized cukes to big uns by tomorrow I think.
Never be too sure what you will get out of your garden spot. I had jars planned on them pickling peppers with some green tomatoes.

gmatov
06-29-2009, 01:53 AM
David,

I hope you get tons of produce. More than you can use. No better way to get rid of the extra than to give to your local food bank.

I hope you enjoy your tomatoes. My favourite crop.

I don't know how you can defend against that kind of storm.

Cheers,

George

Dawai
06-29-2009, 07:10 AM
George..
Well. Brit posts state that they used to plant Hedges in around the garden as windbreaks.

Most the tomato plants look normal, that one plant has gone insane, it has more tomatoes than leaves I think now.
http://photos-g.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs096.snc1/5163_1075350166151_1298124187_30171598_1445566_n.j pg
I am terribly dehydrated, tried to work in the shop during the heat of the day for a couple
days, had to roll my shirt off. After the storm I pushed it trying to save what I could also. I feel really mortal this morning.
http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs096.snc1/5163_1075350246153_1298124187_30171600_2719498_n.j pg
Wish ya was here to share a cup of fresh ground coffee and watch the sun come up over the mountain. My daily enjoyment and high point it seems.

I'll look for some green tomato canning recipes. Chow Chow? (hot cabbage relish?) perhaps something with a zucchini filler too?
I think the over populated plant needs trimming of about three quarters of it's fruit.

I have lost track of how much I have spent on this project. I think less than a hundred still. I printed it here I think, I'll have to look back.

Dawai
06-29-2009, 07:35 AM
Cash outlay..
$105 invested cash.
$20+ zucchini's not counting what was donated away
-$85
$30+ in cucumbers, ate and pickled.
-$55
$20+ in yellow squash
-$35
$5+ in peppers.
-$30
Ball Canning Jars?? Probably $35??
-$65


Some Green bell peppers are the size of baseballs, (wife wants some red-bell peppers in the freezer) now the tomatoes are starting to come in the size of baseballs too.

Trading? barter? We got 8 pints of plum jelly to put back. THE neighbors in the rental have a apple tree loaded down and breaking limbs. I've gave them some cukes and squash. Young poor people with a passle of kids. (much better than dope dealers) I also took some down the road to the Perv's house where there is 4 kids from Lousinana and mom-pop moved in.. total about 9 people in a three bedroom trailer.

Still in the red, but I am confident it will all work out to the positive.. now if I was to pay myself monopoly money at minimum wage.. well... I'd never get out of the red.

Dawai
07-08-2009, 08:13 PM
http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs125.snc1/5380_1079197942343_1298124187_30183392_3898391_n.j pg
Still putting out.. tho..

http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs145.snc1/5380_1079198022345_1298124187_30183394_4276525_n.j pg
Mators are turning lighter, but I have not seen orange or red yet.. Carrols slingshot ammo cherry tomatoes have been on the table for weeks now.

http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs145.snc1/5380_1079198142348_1298124187_30183397_1677317_n.j pg
ONE zucchini appears to be hit by boring bugs?? OR?? also, been trying to cure up some leaf mold.. using detergent in a miracle grow bottle-applicator on the hose.. concentrated detergent, makes a light suds to "NITRATE" the plant and surface-sterilize?? anyways it is working on the other plants.. they change to looking like this..
http://photos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs145.snc1/5380_1079198062346_1298124187_30183395_5280049_n.j pg

wierdscience
07-08-2009, 11:01 PM
Hey David,ya done good,never had problems with squash leaves looking like that,neighbor does every year,he swears by Listerine mouthwash,says it's a fungus and not a bug.He might be on to something,they seem to cure up a week or so after spraying his mouthwash formula on it.I told him he should use the mouthwash first,that would give him improvement in two areas:)

I have not made any myself yet,but I have ate pickled yellow squash and zucchini,it's good.

malbenbut
07-09-2009, 03:27 AM
Nice "toms" David I am quite envious you can grow them outside but at 55 north I have to grow mine in a glass house. The earliest I have ever had a red one was July 11. Usually its the beginning of August before I get any.
Shirleys are the best of the allround tom that I have grown, the kids prefer sweet 100.
MBB

Dawai
07-09-2009, 05:36 AM
Darin: well.. while traveling on the road tattooing, you must "smell" good.. armpit odor is a problem, hit your armpits with listerine and I guarantee smell is gone. 3 spray bottles on the old rack, listerine, alcohol, surgical soap..

Just the thought of that kinda of bacteria growing on me makes me want to shower.

THE leaf mold is a fungus.. now root rot? also one. I have lost three plants completely now. I have also picked and tossed six or more rotten green tomatoes. ONE plant, I am still amazed had 68 on it. I pruned about half that to get them to get larger. Some green ones are the size of bread now.. if they will just get red..

speedy
07-09-2009, 06:22 AM
Dave, your toms will need at least 10 celsius at night before rippening begins, least that is what we expect here. Could that 'mould' be downey mildew? Have you got high humidity?

Dawai
07-09-2009, 08:18 AM
Lemme see.. add 32 degree offset, 10x1.8=18 (100=212-32) degrees.. add 32.. so.. 50 degree Fahrenheit nights? long time off, two months possibly.

I been running birds off.. sicc'ed the dog on one, took him about thirty seconds running around the yard to understand what I wanted.. They peck and eat the seeds from the tomatoes.

MY first year gardening has been quite informative. More manure, more tilling, more planning now that I know what the plants do. THE cucumbers in the back yard I hung on the dog kennel fence.. troublefree to collect.
http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs145.snc1/5380_1079364346503_1298124187_30183756_2684803_n.j pg
I keep having to tell these cucumbers, the pulls from the back yard patch, this is 4 plants producing 2lbs of cucumbers nightly.. to let go of the pepper plants, let go of the tomato plants, let go of the green onions (now swallowed by the zucchini).. the tendrils on the plants, when you string them across the chain link fence they wrap the wire holding on..

Quite humorous I Imagine, seeing a 300lb tattooed man in shorts, no shirt, no shoes a straw hat, collecting cucumbers all bent over with his butt in the air..

Skunk was here last night.. he sprayed my dog last year about this time.

RKW
07-09-2009, 10:52 AM
Just now stumbled upon this thread ...

I know that if/when you water you are supposed to keep water from getting on Zucchini leaves to help minimize problems like this if possible. Also, all those Jerry Baker type formulas are really pretty good and quite safe. Try your local library to see if they have any of his books. Many of the formulas can be found online too. I also found out recently that a capful of Murphy's Oil soap can be added to water to help with these kinds of things.


Hey David,ya done good,never had problems with squash leaves looking like that,neighbor does every year,he swears by Listerine mouthwash,says it's a fungus and not a bug.He might be on to something,they seem to cure up a week or so after spraying his mouthwash formula on it.I told him he should use the mouthwash first,that would give him improvement in two areas:)

I have not made any myself yet,but I have ate pickled yellow squash and zucchini,it's good.

Dawai
07-09-2009, 11:52 AM
I have been trying to not drown the roots. THE nitrates in the soap, well the laundry soap in the miracle grow feeder seems to be clearing most them up.

http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs125.snc1/5380_1079429708137_1298124187_30183906_1267139_n.j pg
I swear I am being visited by the pickle fairy.. since 4:30pm, this is 11:45 am next day.. when I moved the zucchini there was the large one.. Not cut the zucchinis from the front yet..

I just took the goathead hoe to two of the zucchini plants.. one has a oozy looking main trunk I took the picture of.. it is oozing in the corner of the yard now in a pile with the other dying plants.. should I burn them?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BH7_wCAslH4
Dis dat goathead hoe I made from stainless? what else do you expect a old biker-hot rodder to use but a custom hoe?

speedy
07-09-2009, 08:23 PM
50 degree Fahrenheit nights? long time off, two months possibly
Can you jerry rig up some poles and string then semi cloche your toms with frost cloth to keep the night chill off?

More stuff from your hemisphere.
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/tomatoesnotripening.html

Dawai
07-09-2009, 10:01 PM
Was a lady down in SOUTH georgia I was visiting about a million years ago, she packed her magnolia trees roots with ice.. made the most beautiful blossoms..

YOU... If I end up packing my tomato plants with ice to get a red tomato I blame YOU.. ha.. I know.. you didn't write them rules..

I have to tie some more up tomorrow.. they are two feet above the steel rod stakes I put in.. not sure what to do other than just bundle the plants together.

Dawai
07-09-2009, 10:06 PM
OKAY, tell a old biker, what is a frost cloth??

WE got fence on two sides.. be easy to make work if I can figure that out, get possibly another month of tomato production.

My wife says go for it.. we have not bought canning jars yet for the tomatoes.. I keep waiting on some disaster to strike like it did my pickling peppers.. lost all the plants except one.

TYVEK?? paper drop cloth??

speedy
07-10-2009, 05:12 AM
OKAY, tell a old biker, what is a frost cloth??

Polyester or such material.
The following quote is pinched from Mitre 10 site:) ----
You may sometimes see grapevines under what appears to be white blankets during the months of late winter / early spring. Well you wouldn`t be far wrong. Frost cloth, normally a white, mesh cloth is often used to prevent damage to new growth on the vines by commercial growers.
http://www.ritex.co.nz/products/product-t20x2i
http://www.permathene.co.nz/rs/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=58_11

I would T frame/post at end of each row and string two wires then hang the cloth and peg at the bottom. If birds are a problem then T frames enable easy protection using bird netting.
A single wire post to post would do as just well...

Dawai
07-10-2009, 06:48 AM
66F this morning, dew point is the same, it is a nipplish cool morning walking barefoot between the plants.

I just took a stroll around the garden with my cup of coffee in hand. Tomatoes are a lighter color than they were a week ago.

Either I screwed up the c-F conversion or?? anyways.. ain't gonna be that long before I got turning tomatoes.. Some are a yeller-green.. I need to "pluck them at orange??" we have been doing so with the cherrys.. They ripen on the counter without sucking anything from the plants.. there are blooms throughout the plants. MORE.. MORE.. I can see at the "rate of harvest" and canning jars stuck back if I want to extend the time with frost cloths.. once again.. thanks.

HAPPY DANCE.. Like snoopy
http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs125.snc1/5380_1079837318327_1298124187_30184839_8066544_n.j pg
MY FIRST TURNING TOMATO... okay, you need a good laugh? I walked around the garden spot at 6:45am, walked around six or seven more times since.. I gave away six or seven pounds of zucchini, a couple pounds cucumbers, and a couple yellow squash to a needy friend.. NOW, it appears like "star trek beamed" my first turning tomato in..

What did Waylon Jennings say? what goes around comes around..

I am doing a happy dance.. SOON, I can make some salsa. 6 1/2lbs tomatoes, one large white onion, a bunch green onions, a clove garlic, 1/3rd large can of pickled jalapenos (doc uses a whole can), 4 household spoons of black pepper, 4 spoons salt, 4 spoons lawrys seasoning salt.. All chopped to texture and mixed.. set for a day so the tomatoes absorb the salt..

speedy
07-10-2009, 04:14 PM
I like my toms vine ripened. Better taste IMO and better for you; apparently the vitamins and antioxidents(?) are at their best then. There are few things better than munching on home grown produce while checking out the garden for pests and general condition.
At times I would dance too if my legs would allow me:D

Dawai
07-11-2009, 09:25 PM
Yeah, I do my dancing in the garden by the full moon. I'll dance enough for both of us... the skunk has been coming through too.. sheww wiee.. I'm gonna shoot him if he lets me.. last I saw him he was waving that tail at me...

well had three ripe tomatoes, all full of bugs and rotten on the bottom.. I ain't real happy so far with that.

Ok.. jokes over.. now gimme some tomatoes?? come on now.. the plant that had 68 small ones, well I pruned the heck out of it.. we got about 30 some odd yellow mators on it..

(this turned out good for a experiment)
Pickled green tomatoes and mix..
2 small cucumbers per jar
1 zucchini sliced
1 vidalia onion sliced
4 pickling peppers whole
2 jalapeno peppers sliced
1 cayenne pepper whole
Fill remainder with quartered golf ball sized green tomatoes
1/2 tbspoon dill weed seed, two dill heads per jar

Brine,
1 cup vinegar
1/2 cups pickling salt
1 1/2 quarts water
Bring to boil, add to prepacked jars, leave small space at top.

Process in boiling water bath for your sea level, I did mine for 15 minutes at boil. sealed well.. two weeks later I opened the first jar, not real hot, but kinda a hot pickle.. zucchini tastes just like the pickles, peppers are heavenly.. I ate half a quart at a sitting, then loaded some boiled eggs into the open space in the jar and placed in fridge..

IF THEM MATORS DON'T cooperate, they may all be pickled soon.. green...

7-14-09 edit:
http://photos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs125.snc1/5380_1081422797963_1298124187_30190209_2620658_n.j pg
Picked this rascal off the tomato plants. I picked my pickling peppers, picked a basket full of green tomatoes, then made six quarts of pickled green tomatoes and peppers, cucumbers..
(this turned out good for a experiment) Pickled green tomatoes and mix..


7-20-09 edit:
http://photos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs145.snc1/5380_1083806697559_1298124187_30198313_1230184_n.j pg
http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs125.snc1/5380_1083806737560_1298124187_30198314_7160771_n.j pg

john hobdeclipe
07-20-2009, 09:32 PM
If I can only convince some gullible nut that this mater really IS the likeness of the Blessed Virgin Harry.

http://www.auldooly.com/imagehost/P7200184-9.jpg
http://www.auldooly.com/imagehost/P7200185-9.jpg
http://www.auldooly.com/imagehost/P7200186-9.jpg

What do you think? Should I try eBay?

aostling
07-20-2009, 09:46 PM
There are few things better than munching on home grown produce

When I lived in Wellington (1971-78) we typically ate silverbeet, with roasted hogget. This vegetable is unknown in North America. There are no fruiterers here, either.

I doubt if I can grow anything on my south-facing balcony in Phoenix, where it gets to 110ºF every summer day. So you don't know how lucky you are. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYvMeT2GC14

tattoomike68
07-20-2009, 10:14 PM
If I can only convince some gullible nut that this mater really IS the likeness of the Blessed Virgin Harry.

http://www.auldooly.com/imagehost/P7200184-9.jpg
http://www.auldooly.com/imagehost/P7200185-9.jpg
http://www.auldooly.com/imagehost/P7200186-9.jpg

What do you think? Should I try eBay?


man thats cute, LOL

h12721
07-20-2009, 10:35 PM
Hi Dave,
I don't know where you live but dough I just let you gardeners know
that here on the East Coast New York, NJ, Con, Pa and so there is a
Tomato Blight around. It is a strain like the Irish Potato Blight. Kills all the Tomatoes and what ever is in the same Family. A Farm in the county had to kill over 1000 plants.
Hilmar

speedy
07-21-2009, 02:10 AM
When I lived in Wellington (1971-78) we typically ate silverbeet, with roasted hogget. This vegetable is unknown in North America. There are no fruiterers here, either.

I doubt if I can grow anything on my south-facing balcony in Phoenix, where it gets to 110ºF every summer day. So you don't know how lucky you are. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYvMeT2GC14
I know how lucky we are and I also recall how much luckier we were:)
Yes, there is nothing else like a slow cooked hogget with roast onions, carrots, parsnips, kumeras and spuds. Silverbeet, cauliflower and cabbage- with homemade gravy poured over the lot:)
Can you grow the special cactus there?
Allan, you can come down here and share anytime you like . just dont bring any consultants from American think tanks with you;)

Dawai
07-21-2009, 06:46 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v85/ibewgypsie/Dirtyboypickle1.jpg

I been teasing my wife about a Pickle fairy, he comes in the middle of the night and leaves full grown cucumbers. (none today) this is what he left us yesterday..

It only happens to me. Surely.. Strange things, squirrels in my attic having orgies, woodpeckers beating on the side of my house to annoy me.. I ended up with "crazy" dogs that eat the pickling peppers off my pepper plants..

Bobby says ebay it. I think the ad would be pulled.

speedy
07-21-2009, 07:03 AM
I been teasing my wife about a Pickle fairy, he comes in the middle of the night and leaves full grown cucumbers. (none today) this is what he left us yesterday..

So that is how they propagate:) It looks familiar

Bobby says ebay it. I think the ad would be pulled.
Yeah, the world can be a humourless place at times but I would give it a whirl just for the heck of it.
Attach a fairytale to the image and see what eventuates. It could go global:D

Dawai
07-21-2009, 07:20 AM
Well.. yesterday I pulled the first "real red" tomatoes off the vines next to the road. Buried in weeds, red all over. Soft.. ripe.. perfect.. They probably heard me holler in the next county.

I ran inside with them and immediately made 2 quarts of salsa. I am fixing to stir some up in some eggs for breakfast. TODAY, 6:30am walk around.. about half a dozen will be red today, or tomorrow.

They ripen on the counter from orange, but seem to be juicier when ripened on the vine.

I thank everyone who has guided me on this adventure. It has paid off in food, emotional rewards and lessons in patience.

I guesstimate 100+lbs of tomatoes on the 39 plants here. Some are grouped like grapes. I am so blessed, hope you are too.

7-23-09 edit..
http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs130.snc1/5580_1085288374600_1298124187_30202391_5970858_n.j pg
Rocking on.. Love it.. got sweat dripping off my eyebrows.. the apple picker (see welding forum) works great, but cut one and ten fall.. two pounds cucumbers, five pounds bell peppers, four yellow squash, two zucchinis, and about 10lbs near red tomatoes.. Rocking on.. If the old heart stops right now I am happy..

Dawai
07-30-2009, 10:08 AM
http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs130.snc1/5580_1088861743932_1298124187_30211400_6258615_n.j pg
Yeah, a pound and half tomato.. with bird pecks..
I got a window frame full of them half ripe ones, if I leave them on the vines I am losing 80%.. I believe in giving nature it's due but.

Next year I think instead of all Big boy plants started from seed I will do 50% in Roma sauce tomatoes.

In the back yard spot, some of the cherry tomato plants are fifteen plus feet long, we picked four HUGE tomato worms the size of my pickle fingers.. green, stripes.. looked just like part of the stalk. I chopped them up into the soil, gimme back my nutrients in the sincere Scottish tradition.. Spit it out it's mine.. (fly in the soup)

Cucumbers Dying, Zucchini, dead, yellow squash also has leaf mold and dying. I will research here in a bit. Darin said listerine?? WTF??

I think we have put up 20 quarts of apple pie filling, about five now of tomatoes, plum jam, apple jelly, hot pickles, dill pickles, hot mixed veggies.. Salsa canned does not look right.. probably a wasted jar.

Apples gell here at this + sea level point at 235F degrees.. like stirring boiling hot lava.

Dawai
09-11-2009, 11:08 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNua0UEDJa0

Tomatoes, I have been busy here with family matters, they got infested with weeds, I just started weeding them again today, tying them up.

OUR last flat of jars is canned, I have (5) flats of 12 quantity quart jars put up. Pretty happy with what has came out of the ground, thou I only shepherded it. I can find nowhere to store it..

I have not had not one "pretty" tomato that I remember, but I have had plenty of them. Skin deep ugly I know well each morning when I look into the mirror.

NEW reciepe?? Pepper jelly well.. I took the skins (peels) off a dozen large apples, two bell peppers, about ten hot peppers (pickling variety I growed here) and food processed them up.. and boiled them to release the pectin, then ran it all through the food mill (propellor in a cup).. and took the MUSH and cooked it for 20 minutes and added the 4 cups sugar and boiled it till it started gelling, sheeting off the spoon, leaving visible tracks as you stir.. I jar red it up then.

It made a "hot apple jelly".. Not that hot.. but, as you eat it, it bites you back.. I sent a small jar to a Indian friend of my wife at work.. He is a young guy that adores hot food.. A local bud does too.. it is pretty darned good.

madman
09-22-2009, 08:42 PM
You should see our crap garden...

madman
09-22-2009, 08:47 PM
Grewn like ****/

aostling
11-10-2009, 08:04 PM
It was 91ºF in Phoenix today, yet another record day set during 2009. I took a two-hour walk in my neighborhood, and discovered this possible source of free lemons. It looks like the broken limb could go undetected by the owner of the house. What do you gardeners think, is there enough of a nutrient path to the fruit to let it ripen?


http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/freelemons.jpg

Dawai
11-10-2009, 08:33 PM
When I deleted the facebook account, the pictures. I killed most the photo links.. I apologize guys.

Not sure about the lemons.. I never saw them grown before. Not warm enough here.

I can remember being in Florida, being broke, eating grapefruit and oranges till I was sick of them tho.

My garden, what a wonderful life-learning experience. I can tell you, your moods effect everything around you. I have had some problems here with anger issues. go out around plants, they die when you broadcast negative energy, the blooms turn black and fall off.. when you are happy thou, you end up with 11 foot tall tomato plants.

We filled all our fruit jars with tomatoes, eating out of them now. I think we either put up 56 quarts or sixty?? this all from a spot in the yard. the cucumbers.. amazing.. I think the brown cardboard I put down to keep them from lying on the ground held moisture for them.. but later on, also mice.

the Zuchinni.. well right after giving a basket away to some people down the road, they all died of a fungus.

The bell peppers, I gave away I bet 50 lbs of them.

The pickling peppers, remember they were destroyed by a storm? but the three remaining bushes were enough to more than supply our needs. We got everything we asked for.

God is great. I did nothing but tend the garden.

I want to get some more cow manure to till in before the cold weather really sets in. Let it sit and stew till spring.

v860rich
11-10-2009, 10:15 PM
It was 91ºF in Phoenix today, yet another record day set during 2009. I took a two-hour walk in my neighborhood, and discovered this possible source of free lemons. It looks like the broken limb could go undetected by the owner of the house. What do you gardeners think, is there enough of a nutrient path to the fruit to let it ripen?


http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/freelemons.jpg


Get a couple of the ripest ones, ... place them in a box or paper bag, and put a ripe lemon or ripe apple in with them. Close it up and put it in the coolest place you have.
Check it often for ones that might start to rot.

Ripe/ripening fruit gives off ethylene gas that can stimulate the ripening process.
'Off the vine' ripened fruit is not quite as flavorful, but still beats what you buy at the grocery!

THANX RICH

People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

aostling
11-10-2009, 10:22 PM
Ripe/ripening fruit gives off ethylene gas that can stimulate the ripening process.


I've never heard of picking citrus fruit green. Are you sure that would work?

speedy
11-11-2009, 05:13 AM
Hi Allan. I would follow Richs' advice but only harvest half.
My thinking is that there looks to still have half the bark, probably enough to carry nutrients to the fruit but not all of that crop on the broken limb. Prune some of the foliage also.
Part-ripe fruit will not have the nutrient value of fully ripe stuff(it has to run its full course AFAIK) but if the owner gets there before you do, there will be no nutrient value at all for you :)
If the owner lets it be, there could be the chance of a small crop of fully ripened Mother Natures blessing available.

v860rich
11-11-2009, 10:48 PM
I've never heard of picking citrus fruit green. Are you sure that would work?
I know it works with other fruit, never tried lemons, but it's very cheap to try.

As speedy and I said try it with a few and see how it works for you.

THANX RICH

People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

aostling
03-16-2010, 07:09 PM
Today a friend sent me a photo of her garden in Wellington, New Zealand. This reminded me that when I lived there in the 1970s I had use of my landlord's garden, and one of its greens was sorrel. I used this weekly to make a great sauce for fish. I had never heard of sorrel until I moved to New Zealand. Now I cannot find it for sale in any American markets, and I find this lack perplexing.

Do you grow sorrel in your garden? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorrel