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View Full Version : OT- So, has anyone constructed their own fish pond?



Patch
04-02-2009, 10:28 PM
The "Title" pretty much says it all.

Why you created it.
What size?
Any fish, quanity and species?
What type of equipment installed (air, bublers,fountains ect:)?
What type of feed system (shiners,minnows,blue gill)(granulated)?
What problems have you encountered along the way (construction, design)?

I am perhaps 60% complete with one being constructed on my property.

Seeing the post about "Victory Gardens" prompted this post.


:)
Patch

J Tiers
04-02-2009, 11:24 PM
Not for eating fish, ours is "decorative".......

The 'coons do get a meal off it every so often, at least they did with the Koi. Found the scales in a pile, but none of the fish. That 'coon came back another night, but the third night I waited up for him and beat the sh%% out of him.

Now we just have domestic carp.... i.e. goldfish in there. Don't feed em anything, we're not breeding them. They grow to the size the food allows. There are always a few big ones, and the rest little. When a big one dies, a little one grows up.

For a stock pond you need probably at least a 30 foot or bigger pond, and if you have a lot of fish, which you would for any sort of stocking program, you'll need to feed them and probably pump air or aerate the water by some sort of fountain. I understand the best size is around 30 by 50 or so.

The city has stocking ponds that are bigger,. they aerate, but I don't think they feed. They aren't high density.

Seeing Bill's post, I better add that we have had the pond since about 1996, and most of the goldfish are descendants of the first ones. The 'coon was the first year, and he got so much filth in the pond we had to pump it and re-fill. lost some fish too. But since that time, it's been OK.

Barley straw keeps down algae.

Bill Pace
04-02-2009, 11:38 PM
I built one, about 1500 gal .....:(:( after 4 yrs I took the thing up and filled the hole in --- YES! Was not worth the hassle. Course my biggest problem was/is pine trees and the never ending supply of needles (and of course leaves) - and, I'm here in the south and algae was an ongoing battle also - I had about 2-3 months out of the year when it looked nice and maintenance was fairly low.

I finally got a bit of a handle on the algae when I built a filter system about 20 times bigger than most of the literature said would handle. I used a 100 gallon stock watering tank from TSC, with lava rock & commercial A/C filter media. I also increased the pump size about 3 times over what was recommended.

I had an assortment of fish and didnt have a lot of luck there either, a giant Koi and two 49cent goldfish from wallyworld lasted the longest - bout 3 years. Couldnt keep plants to live either--- Oh, you dont need to feed the fish, most folks dont (can add to the algae problem)

So, as you can see, I wasnt very impressed with a "water feature":mad:

Patch
04-03-2009, 12:39 AM
Barley straw keeps down algae.

That's interesting and good to know.
It was an important factor as part of this ponds design. In such, the depth of the pond, once the liner and bedding is in, should be near 4'-6". Most of what I have read and found on the net by hacheries and the Wildlife/Fish& game depts, this is a recommended depth to discourage algae.

Not sure to say if it is a small or large pond but, it measures 110' long and is 30' wide at the upper end and 40' wide at its tail.
Everyone knows the wowowo, ya know, 36"X24"X36". Well, this pond is in two main sections similiar to what a hornet would look like from a top view.
The upper pond will feed into the lower pond and recycle continuelly in a supply mode to the upper pond.




Course my biggest problem was/is pine trees and the never ending supply of needles (and of course leaves)

Such is of similiar situation by design.
Though because of the depths of this pond so far it hasn't created any concerns. (not yet at least)
I found that actually pine needles and cones are good. Seems there is some type of acid or composit in them that helps inhibit weeds. Game & Fish suggested a small dam of pine branches and a few logs. Basicly to give the feeder fish a small haven.


As far as a filter(screen), there isn't but a small one planned whose only purpose will be to filter large trash prior to a pair of jet pumps to feed the upper pond.


So far its been a 2 year fun project. The heavy work is near complete.
This spring and early summer I hope to have the plumbing and liner in followed by a little vegitation, 2 bridges and cabana.
Next year it will get stocked.

The heavy work, well it was. Most of the 80 plus rocks used weighed over 6 ton.


And, I still have a smile over all.

What do you guys think would make nice conversation additives?

J Tiers
04-03-2009, 01:04 AM
Another algae point is pond PH. About 7 is ideal.

One type of algae lives in acid water (under 7), another in basic water (over 7). The sweet spot is about 7 on the nose. The fish like it also.

Paradoxically, for smaller ponds and ornamental fish, some salt in the water helps. Seems to keep the fish healthier.

For a pond 40 x 100 foot (I assume you didn't mean meters) you would need a barley straw bale or two. You gonna stock any northern or muskie in there?

tattoomike68
04-03-2009, 01:26 AM
Yes I made one around 7 foot square with a 1,200 gph pump. It ws just wasted space so I made the pond for about $150 two poly sheets and a tarp. its about 2 feet deep and has fish and snails, the dogs love to drink from it.

http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f24/snoopdog6502/pondbefore.jpg

http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f24/snoopdog6502/fountain.jpg

http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f24/snoopdog6502/pondafter1.jpg

I love it, my feeder gold fish have had babies every year.

Patch
04-03-2009, 01:32 AM
For a pond 40 x 100 foot (I assume you didn't mean meters) you would need a barley straw bale or two. You gonna stock any northern or muskie in there?

Not quite sure as yet.
Game & Fish suggested I stay with species typical to this area which include,
lg mouth bass, stripers, blue gill, catfish, and during the winter a small stock of trout.
The sizing of the pond has the capacity to sustain about 250 fish not including about 800 feeder fish which will propigate.

Though muskie was a consideration for cold climate.

We get heavy freezes also so at this point , I'm not sure what the winter results will be on a static pond.
Changes of which type of fish fair better than the others will be a time consideration based on all-round weather conditions.

The basic stocking plan is about half the total capacity in case a change is needed. Also part of the reason for a 2 pond type setup as this was designed.

OK, heres the where the machinist part comes in now.
The air-rotator system will incorporate 2 verticle multi vaned wind mills.
Something I have not had a chance to fabricate as yet.

Patch
04-03-2009, 01:52 AM
tatoomike68,


That is a very nice pond. I give you much credit of design. I like seeing those which are not purchased such as the polyvinyl type typically sold in the big box stores.

Your ground strata really looks good too. A foot of top soil and a nice sandy loam underlayment.

My area has about 2 to 3 feet of clay over tan sandy/gravely loam. Some of the top clays that I removed will be replaced to help seal the bed before the liner goes in.

tattoomike68
04-03-2009, 01:56 AM
A rolling rotor type pump on a windmill will work just fine, Take a look at a blood pump used for kindney dialysis. real simple to make at any scale.

I would like to make a few small wind powered water pumps to water the grass where I like to go sail boating. We talked about that 10 years ago but still dont have one. more power to you if you make one. take pictures.

tattoomike68
04-03-2009, 02:11 AM
tatoomike68,


That is a very nice pond. I give you much credit of design. I like seeing those which are not purchased such as the polyvinyl type typically sold in the big box stores.

Your ground strata really looks good too. A foot of top soil and a nice sandy loam underlayment.

My area has about 2 to 3 feet of clay over tan sandy/gravely loam. Some of the top clays that I removed will be replaced to help seal the bed before the liner goes in.


Thanks, its all rock hard clay like Cillechi?(spelling) It dont suck water at all. its bad stuff, real tough digging. perfect for ponds.

I did two layers of poly, and a good old green tarp so the rocks dont cut the poly.

getting rocks was a good time, get some beer and go for a drive in the hills and grab rocks from the slide areas.

I love the fish pond so do my visitors its real natural looking other then the center peice. I want one way bigger but thats another project.

A blooming waterlillie

http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f24/snoopdog6502/waterlillie.jpg

Patch
04-03-2009, 02:16 AM
A rolling rotor type pump on a windmill will work just fine, Take a look at a blood pump used for kindney dialysis. real simple to make at any scale.

I would like to make a few small wind powered water pumps to water the grass where I like to go sail boating. We talked about that 10 years ago but still dont have one. more power to you if you make one. take pictures.

Ah yes,
The type of windmills will basically resemble that of an attic turbine. The type that mount to rooftops.
My HVAC man said he would cut and piece them together. They are 3600cfm
in design, and what I would need to fabricate would be the drive system from it to the air pumps. They're a ball type vain and will set on tri-pods 30' above the ground.

The plan is, to use cogged timing belts to reduce fricton and lesson the tension loads of the pump/vain assemblies. I've seen a few of similiar design only they were of a straight vain configuration. Similiar to the squirell fan in evaporative coolers.

And believe it or not, last Xmas I did get a digital camera. The first one in
over 40 years. :)

tattoomike68
04-03-2009, 02:33 AM
Ah yes,
The type of windmills will basically resemble that of an attic turbine. The type that mount to rooftops.
My HVAC man said he would cut and piece them together. They are 3600cfm
in design, and what I would need to fabricate would be the drive system from it to the air pumps. They're a ball type vain and will set on tri-pods 30' above the ground.

The plan is, to use cogged timing belts to reduce fricton and lesson the tension loads of the pump/vain assemblies. I've seen a few of similiar design only they were of a straight vain configuration. Similiar to the squirell fan in evaporative coolers.

And believe it or not, last Xmas I did get a digital camera. The first one in
over 40 years. :)

Thats doable so you want to pump air down and not pump water up?

Patch
04-03-2009, 02:42 AM
Thanks, its all rock hard clay like Cillechi?(spelling) It dont suck water at all. its bad stuff, real tough digging. perfect for ponds.

I did two layers of poly, and a good old green tarp so the rocks dont cut the poly.

getting rocks was a good time, get some beer and go for a drive in the hills and grab rocks from the slide areas.

I love the fish pond so do my visitors its real natural looking other then the center peice. I want one way bigger but thats another project.

A blooming waterlillie

http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f24/snoopdog6502/waterlillie.jpg

Interesting thing about rocks. Always fun to get out.
Most of the rocks I was able to obtain came from the highway dept.
Major new road re-construction. They were free and so was delivery of 35 miles one way.
They needed a place to dump and I needed the rocks. I took in 62 end dumps of rocks. (I did say at that time, What did I get myself into)
Because of their size, they could only get about 4 or five in each trailer because of the weight. I also wound up with about 150 ton of shading/smaller rock which they had to use as a cushion for the large rock in each trailer.

Speaking of a brew and a good time. When I first decided to start this project I went to our local high school and spoke to the dean of ag. dept.
As a future project for one of their classes, when the time comes to vegitate the pond, the class will have a field day of planting.
This will include reeds, cana, seagreen junipers and low profile ferns.
I promised a big wienie roast for the kids. I'm looking forward to that being a very fun day.

Oh, you know the old saying don't ya?

Referring to you wanting a larger pond some day.

If a little bit is good then a lot must be fantastic. :D

Patch
04-03-2009, 02:48 AM
Thats doable so you want to pump air down and not pump water up?

Exactly right.

The jet pumps are for circulating the water. One will be used for a large rain ball the other will be used in conjunction of circulating water and distribut water irrigation to the fruit orchard.

The vained turbins will be only for air-rators. The pumps will be direct drive without any clutchs. There will be 2 pex-poly lines with limiting air valves(for balance) leading to perforated airline underwater and directed to several areas.

Have you done such a thing as this?

Patch
04-03-2009, 03:28 AM
Thought you may want to see what the turbine windmill basiclly looked like.
Tho this one is much a larger scale to help generate electricity the ones I will be making will be smaller scale and also have a half ball cap on top.

Here is a link showing its basic configuration.

http://www.engadget.com/2007/11/26/maglev-wind-turbines-1000x-more-effiencient-than-normal-windmill/

They create an amazing amount of torque given the implied loads.

bob ward
04-03-2009, 09:14 AM
Breed fish for the table and combine it with your victory garden.

There are a few good ideas here, http://www.aquaponics.net.au/

Basically you have fish breeding pond/tanks and hydroponic vegetable beds which form a closed system. Water is continuously circulated from the pond, through the growing beds, then returned to the pond.

The fish eat their food then crap in the pond/tank. The vegetables absorb the nutrients from the circulating water, leaving clean water to return to the fish pond. Once you are set up, all you need is fish food and a bit of electricity for the circulating pump, and in return you get a continuous supply of table fish and vegetables. Brilliant!

I'm going to make one myself as soon as I get a round toit.

jkilroy
04-03-2009, 10:58 AM
If you are going to stock bluegills, I suggest staying away from Hybrids and stick with coppernose bluegills.

http://www.suttlefish.com/coppernose.htm

They are available from lots of suppliers, the closer to you the better.

Jack F
04-03-2009, 01:46 PM
Did you mention the type of liner you will be using? Forgive me if I missed it. When I first built my pond ( 19'x30'x1' to 3 1/2 ' deep) I went cheep and used 3 layers of .010 black plastic sheeting. Bad idea. While performing maintenance I punctured the top layer in several places. Over the next few months water seeped between the top layer and the bottom layers essentially reducing the size of the pond. Long story short; after finding new homes for my fish I replaced the liner with the same stuff that fish hatcheries use. Quite a bit more expensive but 10 years later and no leaks. Blue Harrons helped the Coons to reduce the number of fish I had to find new homes.

Jack.

dp
04-03-2009, 02:50 PM
Around here home made ponds are often called raccoon food courts. As an experiment we put out a 4-foot fountain without the fountain part then put 50 feeder goldfish in it. They were all gone next morning.

http://BuildingMyPond.com/ has a lot of info. Unfortunately a lot of it is podcast so it takes 15 minutes to get 5 minutes worth of reading downloaded. There are a lot of text articles, though.

lwalker
04-03-2009, 02:52 PM
I dug a small pond last year for my ducks, but filled it up at the end of summer: was in a bad location. But I'll be digging a new one shortly where I have more room. I have two Mallards I raised from day old, both drakes. I asked for females but I guess it's harder to sex day old ducklings than chicks. Either that or they didn't read the order at the hatchery! Wife already said she won't eat them so I guess they'll be here for a while :-)

There is a tiny creek that crosses my property that only fills with spring snow melt or after heavy summer rain. Last weekend I found tons of what looked like fingerling-size Northern Pike in it!! So now I'm seriously thinking of digging a big pond and stocking it with a few to see how big they get.

JRouche
04-03-2009, 04:36 PM
I am in the middle of building one, with help of course. Big boulders are between 400-700lbs. There are two spillways and the face of the wall has about ten 1/2" tubes embedded in the wall, sticking out at various areas so water can just be pouring over the rock face.

So three pumps, individually controlled. Holds 1100 gallons. In the process of working up a filtration system now. I will have stainless steel anchors in some areas of the wall face so I can have plants on the face. There will be plants everywhere, inside, attached to and surrounding. Lighting is also wired in (12vac) the center of the pond. After it has stabilized and works well as a plant pond I will dump in some inexpensive fish. The sea birds are a problem though. It sure sounds nice when the waterfalls are going.

Anyway, here is how it started, one boring afternoon and an electric jackhammer LOL JR


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v366/Jrouche/pond/1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v366/Jrouche/pond/2.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v366/Jrouche/pond/3.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v366/Jrouche/pond/4.jpg

JRouche
04-03-2009, 04:37 PM
more pics.. JR

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v366/Jrouche/pond/5.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v366/Jrouche/pond/6.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v366/Jrouche/pond/7.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v366/Jrouche/pond/8.jpg

JRouche
04-03-2009, 04:37 PM
Last ones... JR

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v366/Jrouche/pond/9.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v366/Jrouche/pond/10.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v366/Jrouche/pond/11a.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v366/Jrouche/pond/11.jpg

tattoomike68
04-03-2009, 04:57 PM
JRouche Thats very nice, dont let the tax assessor see it. :D

Patch
04-03-2009, 06:43 PM
Breed fish for the table and combine it with your victory garden.

I'm going to make one myself as soon as I get a round toit.

Good idea Bob. All kinds of possibility there.

"A round toit"? I kicked the dirt around almost a year before I finally said it's time to do something here. Gathering ideas and talking with people got the ball rolling.

Since starting the project, it has been fun and as the days pass the excitement only grows.



If you are going to stock bluegills, I suggest staying away from Hybrids and stick with coppernose bluegills.

I agree. Doing a little homework turned up a few reasons to avoid a hybrid such as, they are slow reproducers at spawn, they're are agressive and territorial over the other feed fish, it takes more of this type to maintain the food chain and they are generally a bit higher in price to stock over the others.
I will be stocking the pond with the "Red Spot" variety.



Did you mention the type of liner you will be using? Forgive me if I missed it. When I first built my pond ( 19'x30'x1' to 3 1/2 ' deep) I went cheep and used 3 layers of .010 black plastic sheeting.

Sorry I didn't mention that.
I am using the commercial grade pond/fountain liner. I had to get 2 pieces that were 125' long and they were 28' wide each. It is a tad more expensive but for the insurance just as you stated of problems I went this route.
The cost was about $0.60 a square foot. Not bad really.
The liner is not plastic, it is 1/8" thick rubber sheet. It's almost impossible to cut this stuff with a knife.

My pond bed will have 3" of clay, then the liner followed by 6" of sandy clay loam for the finish layer.


Around here home made ponds are often called raccoon food courts.
Wow, that sucks.
I would have been out there all nite will Betsy(the shotgun) waiting for the critters.
I hear they taste just like chicken. :D

dp
04-03-2009, 07:01 PM
Wow, that sucks.
I would have been out there all nite will Betsy(the shotgun) waiting for the critters.
I hear they taste just like chicken. :D

I have a feeling raccoon tastes more like boiled fur. Enough of them carry diseases that nobody but a coyote would consider them food, and coyotes won't take them unless they're really hungry because they have a nasty disposition when they're pi$$ed off.

Patch
04-03-2009, 07:01 PM
Last weekend I found tons of what looked like fingerling-size Northern Pike in it!! So now I'm seriously thinking of digging a big pond and stocking it with a few to see how big they get.

I can relate to your duck story. I basicly did as you, just excavate a large hole and fill with water. It was a bad summer at that time, hot and dry.
The ducks I had were eaten by coyotes. Seen the buggers do it to.
Kinda sad.

jkilroy
04-03-2009, 07:14 PM
Coon, properly prepared, is a very fine meal. Hey, I'm from south Louisiana, we'll eat just about anything. Historically coon has been served in the white house.

Patch
04-03-2009, 07:26 PM
I am in the middle of building one, with help of course. Big Anyway, here is how it started, one boring afternoon and an electric jackhammer LOL JR


Yep, been there, done that and still doing that.

Very nice work there JRouche. Your photos are inspiring.
Now that I have a camera and once I figure out how it all works, I guess I should take a few pics of the progress. :)

Evan
04-04-2009, 12:09 AM
We wanted a spot for the birds to get water as it's really dry here in summer. I dug a small pond a few years back and put a proper liner in it. We went to an old abandoned quarry up on the riverside and brought back a ton or so of slate. It turned out pretty nice. We like it and the birds love it. The fish eat the mosquitos. It freezes solid in the winter so we just buy a few more feeder goldfish. By the end of summer they are about 3 to 4 inches long.

That's my alter ego sitting watching the birds.

http://ixian.ca/pics6/pond.jpg

This is a pond I would like to build.

http://ixian.ca/pics6/shenge.jpg

Patch
04-04-2009, 11:50 AM
Evan,

Nice pond setting. I like seeing the use of lattice and climbing vines.
Around here I have an assortment of birds. A flock of chickens, a herd of peacocks, a lot of crow, raven and quail and occasional guinnie hens and a very few songbird.


Your second photo reminded me of Easter Island for some reason.:)


So, this pond I got going is rather large. What do you all think of accents for it?

What would you want to add for interest to liven it up and create strange little senarios?

Evan
04-04-2009, 12:20 PM
How about a little exile island? :D

Not Easter Island, Stonehenge...

Patch
04-04-2009, 03:59 PM
How about a little exile island? :D

Thanks Evan, that actually was a good idea.
After I read your suggestion I went out to the pond area and sat for about 30 mintes thinking about. It appears aslong as I keep it at about 6' diameter
it would fit nicely.

If you think of anything else just give a shout. :)

radkins
04-04-2009, 10:47 PM
One quick way to RUIN your pond is to toss in a couple of wild fish caught locally. Seems everyone I know who has a pond has done that and eventually the fish wind up with all sorts of mysterious ailments and never seem to attain any decent size, the usual excuse for that is that the pond is overstocked. The fact is wild fish will most likely carry everything from growth stunting viruses to parasites and in the relatively small enclosed area of a home pond these will spread like wildfire and once contaminated it is next to impossible to eradicate these blights. These problems need not be a problem at all however if you stock only fish from a reputable hatchery and in my pond I will not even allow minnows for feed for my Bass unless I know exactly where they come from!

torchroadster
04-05-2009, 12:08 AM
Tons of great info here....

http://www.pondboss.com/

Too_Many_Tools
04-05-2009, 12:35 AM
Interesting discussion.

How do you handle the liability of having a drowning hazard without a fence around it?

BillH
04-05-2009, 12:43 AM
I always liked the water, never had to have a pond though, since the family home is on a lake. Nice ponds. Evan, that looks a bit like stone henge.

JRouche
04-05-2009, 03:39 AM
JRouche Thats very nice, dont let the tax assessor see it. :D

Hey thanks.. Oh but tax man, I just dug a hole in the dirt and added some rocks, cant we do that these days :) Just the pit in the backyard, thats what my wife was calling it. JR

texas_po_boy
04-05-2009, 07:49 PM
Well my granddaughter almost drown in my pool. So I just caught and released some catfish,bass,and perch in it. Water is so green I don't know if anything is still alive or not. I will have to wet a hook someday and see. hehehe My wife is on my case to fill it in. Got a 6' fence around it though.

Patch
04-05-2009, 10:16 PM
These problems need not be a problem at all however if you stock only fish from a reputable hatchery and in my pond I will not even allow minnows for feed for my Bass unless I know exactly where they come from!

I promise that should I ever have the opportunity to introduce a "Wild" fish
to my pond, that I will first give it a good washing with 2 cups of tide detergent in the washing machine. Tho when finished I do believe when it gets to the dryer that it may be a tad hard on the little beast.:D


Good advice to hear radkins.

Patch
04-05-2009, 10:18 PM
Tons of great info here....

http://www.pondboss.com/

Good site my friend. A lot of info that will certainly help in this project.

Patch
04-05-2009, 11:24 PM
Interesting discussion.

How do you handle the liability of having a drowning hazard without a fence around it?

Too_Many_Tools,
That certainly was on my mind when the whim of a pond was developing and before the project got started I inquired into my home owers insurance and the Bureau of Land Management as well as state and local codes.

In many states, having a home or commercial recreational "Pool" there are a lot of rules and regulations. A fence is atop the list as well as safe guarding personelle and equipment, enviromental impact conditions, Libility Insurance and clean restroom facilities.
However, many of these rules are dropped in the development of a recreational pond, fish pond, irrigation pond or fountain and basic new guidelines are presented that should be followed.

From what I understand to believe based on the above.

Having an unfortunate drowning or mishap is never good. Reguardless where , what and when.
In such an occurance, it generally falls on the parents of the child, guardian, or caretaker while a child is in supervision over any event. It is called "Child Neglect" and the preceedant would be certainly liable.

The homeowner could fail aswell. Such as, say for instance around the pond a wooden walkway gives way under the presence of a person of child and they are hurt. This would be a case for your homeowners insurance to cover.
Or say, you have a swing set near to pond, the kids are swinging and a chain breaks or the seat comes apart. Another homeowners insurance situation.
Such things are and should be maintained in good order to prevent injury.
This goes well into any atmosphere.

Unlike the rules concerning a pool ponds are a bit different. Certainly there are rules to follow and limitations.
One being that a fence is not mandatory.
Think for a moment. NYC, Grand Central Park, which has a variety and scale to parklike features including ponds.
New sub-division developments that offer manmade lakesides and pond living.
Cattle ranches and forest reserves, wildlife preserves and even the farmers with their irrigation ponds. All open in general to public transit and without fences.

Never the less, not for any of the above for-instances, I do have a 5' gated 3 acres fenced setting for this pond in development.
The prime reasons for such is due to the abundance of wild animals, such as deer, javalina, lost or roaming dogs and cattle. On average, dozens of cattle tromp in the year, literally a hundred plus per month of wild piggy, 1 to 2 dozen deer(that gets noticed) each year and almost every month roaming dogs.
Large animals do in fact tear up a landscape and many floral and abricultural features. What a mess.
I do have a few signs that will be posted such as: no swimming or wading, children must be accompanied by parents or guardian when in close proximity
to landscape features or pond, do not drink the water- fish swim and pee in it. :)

Nevertheless, there are rules a person should follow. Good guidelines and planning, homeowners insurance, common sense and supervision as well as good maintance to all features.

I for one do not know it all. The hope of a safe and enjoyable pond is zenith.

The best always, check within your local area. Insurance, follow state and local codes, and construct to good guidelines for all the above.

Certainly more comment could be added to all this but my fingers are about numb.

I hope some of your questions and concerns have been touched upon.

All the best,

Patch

BillH
04-05-2009, 11:31 PM
Too bad ponds can create havens for mosquitoes

Patch
04-05-2009, 11:36 PM
Well my granddaughter almost drown in my pool. So I just caught and released some catfish,bass,and perch in it. Water is so green I don't know if anything is still alive or not. I will have to wet a hook someday and see. hehehe My wife is on my case to fill it in. Got a 6' fence around it though.

Kindof a sad note, not really for comment, but I had a niece that at age 1 drowned in a small 4' wading pool with 2" of water. 17 minutes for EMT's resussitate her.
It was terrible. She lived 23 years in a vegitated state. Ruined my brother and his wife's life and brought on many hardships.
It was a time, tho never to forget, found it very hard to put behind us all.

Patch
04-05-2009, 11:37 PM
Too bad ponds can create havens for mosquitoes

I'm not real fond of them either.:eek:

Evan
04-06-2009, 02:35 AM
Too bad ponds can create havens for mosquitoes


Not really. Mosquitos don't do well in a clean pond with a good stock of fish. Fish just love mosquito larvae. We never have any visible in our pond. Mosquitoes usually thrive in small quantities of standing water. There they don't have predators to worry about. In the forest that means water that collects in the hollow of rotted or burnt out trees and stumps. In open fields and valleys it means still water in swamps that are too dense for most fish species. Thay also aren't big travelers. Forest mosquitos never go more than about 50 feet out of tree cover since that exposes them to being eaten by birds such as swallows. If you live in the southern US you need to make sure that your pond is always stocked with fish and is kept clean. Most people don't know that malaria is still present in the southern parts of the US.

The Anopheles mosquito is common in the south and every year there are some cases of malaria that turn up in people that have never left the country.