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John Stevenson
04-03-2009, 03:51 AM
Not wanting to hijack Sids post on the quill light I though I'd start a new one

I am really interested in this subject as the two old fashioned machine lights on the Bridgy are crap.
They are impossible to get into the right position and if you can, the arms get in the way.

I have looked at what various people have done but I'm not sure that these LED's will put as much light out as the old 24v incandescents.
24 volt Halogens are reasonably rare here as regards mainstream applications so expensive and the transformer on this and the other two lathes are 50 / 25 volt, not 24 / 12 so the cheap low voltage kitchen and household lights are out.

I got a 6 led torch and tried it on the machine at night and to be honest it was a waste of time although I believe you can now get really bright white LED's.

I can't use a quill mounted unit for a few reasons, because I often get in tight spaces where the quill catching on the work is a limitation and I have a horizontal and high speed attachment that bolts to the quill.

Something I have not seen at all, is in Sid's No #2 post, both lower pictures, has anyone else noticed the dead space between the back of the quill and the end of the sliding ram ?

All there is there on my machine is a dovetail bracket [ original ? ] that holds the coolant pipe.
I had thought about a couple of small lights fitted to this, one either side on adjustable rods like a dial gauge stand [ or even two magnetic stands to try it ] with the light on the end.

Comments, flames, flying bricks etc.

Question probably for Evan as he has more experience on the subject than I have [ thinking about it even our dog has :rolleyes: ]

I can get 6 high powered LED's that run off 24v in series with it's resistor. I was thinking about making a small spot light like the halogen ones out of a lump of alloy.
Machine a reflector, drill 6 holes in it perpendicular to the face and put a plain, flat, Lexan cover / lens over it.

Looking 2" diameter or a tad above, what shape does the reflector need to be ? can do this on the small CNC lathe.

.

Mark McGrath
04-03-2009, 03:55 AM
John,save up your pennies and get a Waldmann catalogue.The cat is free but the lights are top prices.Last for ever though and coolant etc doesn`t bother them.Avoid Chronos halogen lights at all costs.

John Stevenson
04-03-2009, 04:04 AM
Mark,
All the halogen's I have seen are 12 volt, OK some have inbuilt transformers but that means running cables to machines.
I'm looking at head replacements so I can use existing holder / wiring etc with the exception of the Bridgy which needs new holders.

I'm probably looking at 9 or 10 new heads which gets expensive.

.

lynnl
04-03-2009, 04:23 AM
I bought a little flex neck LED light from HF recently. It has both a magnet and clip-on base - real handy as far as that goes. But... although it's extremely bright to look at, that LED light just doesn't seem to provide much useful illumination of the target.

Timleech
04-03-2009, 04:59 AM
Not directly addressing your question, but I've wondered about an LED head torch, make up a bracket for it which should be dead easy (some of them are dual purpose head/cycle lamps)
I have one with 30 LEDs, gives a pretty useful light though haven't tried it on a machine.
Obvious limitations are -
-Not immensely durable or completely coolant proof - though they are made for outdoor use.
-Dependent on batteries, not great for use during the full working week but should be fine for occasional work
-They often have those irritating multi-mode push buttons, which you have to cycle through to get the one you want.
I must admit I haven't followed the other thread right through, so may be touching on something which has already been covered.

I got a 1W single LED torch the other day, no use directly for machine work but very impressive in terms of light output for physical size and alleged battery life. Runs off three AAA cells, I'd expect that half a dozen of those LEDs off a 24V supply would do a fairly impressive job.

Tim

.RC.
04-03-2009, 06:29 AM
My mill had a 24V light on it and I just replaced it with a 12V Halogen spot light and wired the tranformer into the switchgear box.. I think it is 50W with a 30 degree spread..Holder, bulb and transformer was AU$15. (So I got two :))

Spin Doctor
04-03-2009, 06:47 AM
Part of the solution is if you think you have enough lighting inthe shop. Think again and double it. My shop area is small with a low ceiling. The best solution I have found so far is track lighting with a lot of lamp heads. Plus I have some LED swing arm lamps I picked up at the Tiawan Hardware Store (Menard's)that I will mount right on the machines them selves.

NickH
04-03-2009, 07:09 AM
John,
on a 24V machine run 12V halogens - in pairs wired in series?
I've harvested the sockets from kitchen lighting kits from B&Q's bargain shelf.
Regards,
Nick

sid pileski
04-03-2009, 08:26 AM
John- My mill is a ProtoTrak K3. It's a bit bigger that a standard Bridgeport mill. Maybe that's why the space behind the quill your seeing?
Yes, there are some dead spots. I used one common ring of PCB. If I used separate ones, they could have been angled and aimed to fill just beond a chuck distance for instance.
The lighting is not perfect. That's why I mounted it with magnets, so it comes off easy. I didn't get rid of my 110v task lights either.
The whole thing cost me nothing but an hour or so of time, and was more of an experiment.

Sid

Timleech
04-03-2009, 08:31 AM
For 24V halogens, what about commercial vehicle headlamp bulbs, or would they be Over The Top?
Actually they wouldn't run at full brightness on a true 24V supply, as vehicle voltage with engine running will be around 28 to 30V

Tim

pressurerelief
04-03-2009, 09:18 AM
I made my light starting with some bulbs from this place.

http://www.ledlight.com/1156-1157-automotive-led-lights.aspx

Sockets are available on line and easily repaired, don't ask how I know.

Rick

davidfe
04-03-2009, 10:10 AM
For 24V halogens, what about commercial vehicle headlamp bulbs, or would they be Over The Top?
Actually they wouldn't run at full brightness on a true 24V supply, as vehicle voltage with engine running will be around 28 to 30V

Tim

I have some Xenon - from the local box store (Home Depot / Lowes etc.) and they are super bright. BUT, they are hot. Yu will burn your self it you touch them. They are also hot if you have to keep body parts near them too.

I just got a clamp on desk type light from Home Depot. Abojut $ 40.00.
It has 30 LEDs on a flexible arm and is super bright.

David

derekm
04-03-2009, 11:34 AM
John,
on a 24V machine run 12V halogens - in pairs wired in series?
I've harvested the sockets from kitchen lighting kits from B&Q's bargain shelf.
Regards,
Nick

I'm with nick on this one. but you dont need anything new just one old blown bulb, and two of the G4 capsule small halogen bulbs. Break the glass off the old bulb and solder in the two small halogens in series to the wires that held the filament. two like this one
http://img-europe.electrocomponents.com/uk/img/site/campaigns/bm/tung_2.gif
l

John Stevenson
04-03-2009, 11:40 AM
Yup, that will sort out one or two machines but I have the Bridgy, small TOS, large TOS, CVA and Beaver plus the odd other all with crap lights that need replacing.

As I posted earlier if I'm going down this route I need about 9 new heads.

The light on the big TOS is about 30 years old has has been run over by every truck going thru this postcode, or it looks like it.

The small TOS has more inards hanging out of it than on CSI forensic

9 new quality lights are serious coin.

dan s
04-03-2009, 01:53 PM
before you buy any leds find out what the lumens/watt ratio is.

You can find leds that pump out 75+ lumens per watt fairly easily. Most of the cheap flashlights (torch) only pump 20-30 lumens lumens per watt. The industry is currently working on leds that pump out 160ish.

lwalker
04-03-2009, 02:05 PM
75 lumens/W LEDs can get expensive. The ones I've seen cost about 2x as much as the 50 lumens/W ones.

The two big things to remember with the high power LEDs (1 watt+) are current and heat dissipation. You can easily get current drivers for LEDs if you're concerned about efficiency (dealextreme.com is a source), or use a resistor as long as the power supply is a regulated one. Old PC power supplies are cheap/free everywhere.

Heat dissipation: high power LEDs need to have the heat removed directly from the die and so there is normally a flat spot underneath that must be in contact with a heatsink. 3&5mm LEDs use the leads to remove the heat, but the big 1W & 5W ones can't get enough out that way. If they're not kept cool they will die in the first few hundred hours of operation (if not immediately). They can be purchased already mounted on "stars" - hexagonal aluminum pads that can be screwed to a heat dissipating surface, but the star mount adds about 30-50% to the price.

When I asked about hollow mills a few months ago I was planning to make a flat AL plate with some bosses that would be an LED heatsink. The plan was to mount 6 or so LEDs on a PC board like in the other thread, but with a hole under each LED that the aluminum boss would protrude through to contact the underside of the LED. That project is still on the drawing board :-(

danlb
04-03-2009, 02:33 PM
I did essentially what lwalker proposed on my micromill. Under the head I mounted an aluminum plate to act as a heat sink. I attached a high power LED and run it from an old DC wall wart with a current regulator. It backlights the work rather well. ( about 500 cp at the vise)


Dan

pcarpenter
04-03-2009, 02:47 PM
I bought 2 or three of the smallish track light heads that take the 120v halogen bulbs with the built-in reflector. I got them on close out for like $4 each. The bulbs are worth more than that. I sprayed the outside machinery gray. Now all I have to do is make up an arm (yet to be done) and wire it. I already expermented and you can make a flex arm out of a piece of the flexible plastic conduit with a piece of large solid copper wire in it. The wire provides rigidity, but allows you to flex it where you need it.

For at least one of the machines, I intend to just mount the track head directly to a box with a magnet on the back side. This can stick on the underside of the Bridgeport ram for example, with a magnet. No need for a flex arm.

I don't remember exactly how I engineered attaching the light to the box using the little stub of an arm the fixture has, but I successfully removed the track-light fitting from the end of that little arm and I think it was left with a thread and a nut. I engineered all this a while back, but never got around to finishing it.

Paul

small.planes
04-03-2009, 03:51 PM
These (https://www.bltdirect.com/product.php?pid=10467) *should* fit straight into a normal 12V fitting (assuming G4 base) and just work off your existing 24V supply. 35W isnt much in room terms, but as a short distance spotlight it should be plenty.

Alternatively this place (http://www.ricamstore.co.uk/erol.html#5346x0&&http%3A%252F%252Fwww.google.co.uk%252Fsearch%3Fhl% 3Den%26q%3D24v+halogen+bulb%26btnG%3DGoogle+Search %26meta%3D%26aq%3D2%26oq%3D24V+ha) has upto 50W in the other (G5.3) standard sort of base.

just mounting to sort then....

The 50mm ones will fit straight into a screw compression waste pipe fitting (had a 50W :cool: bike light on my MTB whilst at uni), smells a bit hot, but hasnt melted yet :eek:

Dave

Frank Ford
04-03-2009, 04:57 PM
For me, it wasn't the light itself but the mounting I always had trouble with. So, I recently made a "swing-away" arm for a regular machine light head. With the rear pivot set loose, I can simply bat the arm to move the light out of the way to the left, and swing it right back into place without any tricky adjustment:

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Tooling/LightArm/lightarm27.jpg

It's one of those "works-for-me" rigs. Here's the full write-up:

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Tooling/LightArm/lightarm.html

lakeside53
04-03-2009, 09:39 PM
For the $$.. these can't be beat.. I got mine yesterday, and will be ordering two more. Very solid an well built. Enco sells the same unit for 2-3X this price.


http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&item=350117632997

Evan
04-04-2009, 01:45 AM
I don't think John was planning on spending $600 for lights.

Here is a pretty good solution. Make your own bracket. It's an 80 lumen 3 watt flashlight with adjustable optics for flood to beam and is $10. Three watts is plenty of light especially if you can adjust the beam width as this can.' It runs on 4.5 volts DC max so all you need is a 5 volt power supply and a 1N4000 series diode in series to give 4.5 regulated volts.

http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.18304

danlb
04-04-2009, 02:04 AM
I don't think John was planning on spending $600 for lights.

Here is a pretty good solution. Make your own bracket. It's an 80 lumen 3 watt flashlight with adjustable optics for flood to beam and is $10. Three watts is plenty of light especially if you can adjust the beam width as this can.' It runs on 4.5 volts DC max so all you need is a 5 volt power supply and a 1N4000 series diode in series to give 4.5 regulated volts.

http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.18304

That is not a bad idea at all. Use caution when using an external power supply with such a cheap light running from AAA batteries. The light depends on the tiny battery's tendency to drop it's voltage quickly under heavy loads. They quickly drop to 3 1/2 volts for 3 batteries. It has no electronics to limit the current.

A good 5 volt power supply will not drop it's voltage, so it's likely to burn up the LED.

If you want to use such a setup look for the words "regulated" in the description of the light.

Dan

Evan
04-04-2009, 02:13 AM
Yeah, it would probably be a good idea to add two diodes in series as that will drop the voltage to just under 4 volts. It will also provide some current limiting. I don't think that particular flashlight will cook too easily because the same flashlight is available powerd by CR123 lithium cells. They can supply a lot of current.

edit: In this case when they say unregulated they mean that it won't boost as the voltage drops. It does regulate to a maximum of 700 ma. I know this from checking the specs on the regulator modules they sell separately. The voltage boosting dc-dc supplies will provide maximum current until the dropout voltage is reached.

Timleech
06-20-2009, 04:51 AM
John, did you come to any conclusion on this?
I'll be looking for a light for my new lathe, it has a 25/50V lighting supply built into the cabinet but the light itself is long gone.
I can rob the clunky old 1950s unit from the old lathe, but it might be good to move ahead a bit with the times ;)

Tim

John Stevenson
06-20-2009, 05:14 AM
Found some LED's, those star shaped things that Evan pointed to in another post.
there is even a guy in the UK with them in stock if you don't fancy dealing with the Chinese at Deal extreme.

The stumbling block is finding an off the shelf housing that looks like a work light and not something made out of a bean can then rigging it all up.

Unfortunately work and bloody customers keep getting in the way.

Circlip
06-20-2009, 05:56 AM
There was a construction artical in MEW a while ago using a piece of extruded Aluminininium tube as the light head, (Halogen blub). The concept was a single light head with stems fixed to individual machines to clamp the unit to (How many machines can you run at once and need a set up light simultainiously). Will dig out if yer interested, seems like the "Cree" solution would ressurect the concept, an answer looking for a problem.

Regards Ian.

John Stevenson
06-20-2009, 06:26 AM
Ian,
That was one option I was thinking of, can't remember the article but I can search and have a look, I have the full series.

My problem is only one lathe has a half decent lamp although it's got a mis matched reflector and a broken glass lens.

Moving lights is out the question as on say just one job I may need 3, possibly 4 machines and the whole idea of my shop is to have as much gear setup as possible to get jobs out quick and cheaply, hence quick change holders, one lathe setup for imperial threads, one for metric etc.

Moving a light only adds to the time spent.

I don't mind spending the time as it will pay back, just need to spent it the best way.

aboard_epsilon
06-20-2009, 10:05 AM
run these off your 25 volt ..2 in series

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/20-x-G4-Halogen-Light-Bulbs-Lamps-12v-20watt-LOOK-4-99_W0QQitemZ250309448422QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUK_Ligh t_Bulbs?hash=item3a479b12e6&_trksid=p3911.c0.m14&_trkparms=65%3A7%7C66%3A2%7C39%3A1%7C240%3A1318%7C 301%3A1%7C293%3A1%7C294%3A50

you can put four of them in each fixture ..
and they are dirt cheap

Ive had some off the guy above ..and they haven't buggered up yet after over a year.

all the best.markj

Circlip
06-20-2009, 10:23 AM
It looked like the dogs dooflers when I first saw it, but now, (Issues 2 and 22) it looks like what the dog left.

Regards Ian.

Doozer
06-20-2009, 11:30 AM
http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i169/kooldoozer/Machines%20and%20Stuff/SDC10585_2.jpg

Here is a Ledu small florescent light made by Luxo Lighting. I think it is made in Germany. It is mounted on my Clausing w/M-head mill. It lights from behind and floods the whole vise area. It used those twin tube florescents that plug in at one end, usually used in exit signs and other things. One mod I made was to take 5" out of the arms. They are square tubing, and I just cut them and re-drilled the bolt holes. It is a sweet light and it is out of the way. It is mounted to some existing holes in the column where the reversing switch used to be.
--Doozer

DaHui
06-21-2009, 01:28 AM
Picked up this dental light on ebay for about 200 bucks. I know it sounds like a lot but they are around 900 new...and it's awesome, so that is worth something.

Some day I might mount it directly to the mill but this way I can wheel it to where ever it's needed. The beam is kind of wide and flat but that doesn't really bother me.

http://www.the-alchemist.com/Images/light.jpg

http://www.the-alchemist.com/Images/light-mill.jpg

J Tiers
06-21-2009, 09:43 AM
IMO all the solutions which you folks have posted pictures of would suck for me big time.

The one point source light is the problem, it seems that there are always shadows.

We have a couple of those stereoscopic microscopes at work for examining failures, and doing SMT electronic repair. One has a zoom that will make one lead of a close pitch SMT package fill the field of view.

One needs a lot of light to get decent viewing on that sort of magnification.

So what we have is a ring of fairly ordinary white light LEDs around the lens. Gives very even light and very little in the way of shadows, since there are about 8 or 10 LEDs.

Similarly, it would seem that such a setup in a rugged package would fit around the quill, and give pretty darn good light for 1x viewing.

I'd maybe make it in a "U" shape so it could be swung away when not wanted. The lights at the end of the "U" would need to be turned a bit to cover the area right

Haven't done it myself, since I have a horizontal, and no viewing issues due to shadowing. If I get a more useful vertical head than what I have, I;ll probably make a light along the lines of the above..

Circlip
06-21-2009, 12:51 PM
Unfortunately, your solution would suck big time for me JT. The trouble I find with the modern answer looking for a problem uses of the "White" LED'S is the intense white/blue illumination of whatever they are shone on.

Being over the age of puberty, I find that the harsh cast given by them tends to give me an eyestrain, bit like todays Youf thinks loud is good.

A co-ordinate measuring machine I once had to use in the P/C trade had two lamp heads on Flexi stalks that had incandescent bulbs in them for illuminating the "Target" under a microscope head.

Although one had to keep looking away to De-focus from the microscope, the "Warm" light didn't cause undue strain.

How close to natural daylight is the frequency of these new wonder lights???

If all else fails Sir John, Remember "Torchy the battery boy" ???


Regards Ian.

Quetico Bob
06-21-2009, 02:11 PM
I have one of these, actually it belongs to my son. Was given to him with a camo school back pack from his uncle. He wants it back!

http://www.garritylites.com/page68.html

It is probably the brightest flashlight I have ever seen in such a small package, you know the type. Just have to shine it in your eye to test out…see nothing but spots. Sad thing is I couldn’t believe it the first time, how something so small, OMG couldn’t see for ten minutes.

Walmart was selling them for around the $5 mark. As soon as they are back in stock going to pick up a several just for the head assembly of it for my mill.

Cheers, Bob

danlb
06-21-2009, 03:11 PM
Unfortunately, your solution would suck big time for me JT. The trouble I find with the modern answer looking for a problem uses of the "White" LED'S is the intense white/blue illumination of whatever they are shone on.

[ clip ]
How close to natural daylight is the frequency of these new wonder lights???


Regards Ian.


The tint of the LED will vary depending on the type and the manufacturer. There are "warm white" LEDs that have a tint similar to incandescent. There are 'show white' that are color neutral. There are "cool white" that have a slight bluish tint.

Last night I ordered some special LEDS that are neutral white, and give 100 lumens at 1/3 amp. I figure I will use three of them around the spindle of my mill, protected by a clear plastic cover, powered by a 3.5 volt, 1 amp power supply. Each will consume 1 watt, so there will be no heat to worry about.

You can read about them here : http://www.philipslumileds.com/products/line.cfm?lineId=19

or order them here: http://www.futureelectronics.com/en/technologies/semiconductors/lighting-solutions/high-power-led-emitters/white/Pages/4840195-LXML-PWN1-0100.aspx

Dan

J Tiers
06-21-2009, 11:13 PM
Unfortunately, your solution would suck big time for me JT. The trouble I find with the modern answer looking for a problem uses of the "White" LED'S is the intense white/blue illumination of whatever they are shone on.

Being over the age of puberty, I find that the harsh cast given by them tends to give me an eyestrain, bit like todays Youf thinks loud is good.


That's because you don't know about the white LEDs.

The ones you refer to are "blue" as far as I am concerned, and they suck so bad they are gobbling up the sun. They pull your eyes right out of your head.....

The LEDs we use ARE white, they render colors well, which the blue ones absolutely do not, and they are still bright enough to be more than required.

I can't stand the blue ones even for a flashlight..... maybe ESPECIALLY for a flashlight. They remind me of an inferior type of mercury vapor streetlight..... All colors are moved to something else, the color wheel is completely fouled up.

best to open ze mind....... and it's perfectly possible that i am older than you... so not one o dem youf....

Evan
06-22-2009, 12:16 AM
You can buy any color temperature LED you want now. You can even buy RGB bulbs with remote controls that allow you to tune the output over the entire spectrum with hue and saturation controls. Blue/white LEDs are still available but they are not the only choice. If you are buying from DealX then pay attention to the Cree Bin codes. Follow their link to the explanation because the bin code tells you what you are buying. Certain bin codes mean the emitters are selected for maximum brighteness with no attention to colour match, others mean they are colour and brightness matched and others mean colour match only and others mean floor sweepings.

If you are buying LEDs and they are not identified by some sort of Cree style bin code then it's a crap shoot what you will get. Sometimes you will get very nice emitters and other times garbage. I received one package of 5mm LEDs from DealX that had nothing inside the plastic. That was not usual and they must have gotten some trash supplied to them. It wasn't worth complaining about as they cost less than $2.

.RC.
06-22-2009, 07:58 AM
I installed some new machine lights recently...They work really well in the daytime, but get quite dull at night :D

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v606/OzRinger/sheddoors002-1.jpg

Evan
06-22-2009, 08:01 AM
Each one of those skylights is equivalent to around 2000 to 3000 watts of interior lighting. Pretty hard to beat.

oldtiffie
06-22-2009, 08:12 AM
Picked up this dental light on ebay for about 200 bucks. I know it sounds like a lot but they are around 900 new...and it's awesome, so that is worth something.

Some day I might mount it directly to the mill but this way I can wheel it to where ever it's needed. The beam is kind of wide and flat but that doesn't really bother me.

http://www.the-alchemist.com/Images/light.jpg

http://www.the-alchemist.com/Images/light-mill.jpg

Thanks DaHui.

If that is one of those superbly balanced "shadow-less" dental lights - you've done very well indeed. I could make very good use of it!!!

It would have to be next best to an Operating Theatre over-head suspended balanced light.

If you will excuse the (intended) pun, it will put all the others in the shade.

Circlip
06-22-2009, 08:28 AM
" ....... and it's perfectly possible that i am older than you..."

Listen Sunbeam, I remember Having to Light grain of wheat bulbs with a taper and put a glass shade round them. :mad:

No, seriously, I have seen the whites, but the fact that even when you have a halo round the spindle on a vertical machine, or a "Clump" of them to highlight some other feature, you still have to move to look around the job.

At the end of the day it's always going to rely on a personal prefferance.

Regards Ian.

oldtiffie
06-22-2009, 09:09 AM
Jeez Ian.

I sure ain't no sun-beam!!!

Maybe some here should use their halo - its bright enough.

I guess that if they can't see their mill/job it must be where the sun don't shine.

danlb
06-22-2009, 11:29 PM
Since a 25 watt halogen bulb will radiate from 250 to 400 lumens (omnidirectional) I figure that I will do OK with 3 100 lumen LEDs that only use 1 watt each.

Light falls with distance, so having 300 lumens on the quill will give more light than a 25 watt halogen that's a foot further away. You also get directional light from an LED, so you do not lose light that hits the socket.

Of course, poor design or implementation can ruin any project. :)

Dan

J Tiers
06-23-2009, 09:03 AM
Listen Sunbeam, I remember Having to Light grain of wheat bulbs with a taper and put a glass shade round them. :mad:


When I was little, dirt was still clean........

I am STILL lighting oil lamps to see by........ and using a stone hammer..... is there another way?

Circlip
06-23-2009, 10:42 AM
Well Seven of us lived in a shoe box and we all had to sit in front of one eating a mint to get warm from their breath, WE had it tough :D :D

Regards Ian.

oldtiffie
06-23-2009, 04:45 PM
And which is Fred and which is Barney? Perhaps you need Wilma to sort it out - again!!

http://images.google.com.au/images?hl=en&q=fred+flintstone&um=1&ie=UTF-8&ei=CD5BSrelFKb26gPZ_qyeCQ&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&resnum=1&ct=title

http://images.google.com.au/images?hl=en&um=1&sa=1&q=barney+rubble&btnG=Search+images&aq=f&oq=

John Stevenson
06-23-2009, 05:06 PM
Well Seven of us lived in a shoe box and we all had to sit in front of one eating a mint to get warm from their breath, WE had it tough :D :D

Regards Ian.

You forgot the uphill both ways and the slice of bacon nailed to the back door that you wiped your bread on.

.

oldtiffie
06-23-2009, 08:08 PM
Originally Posted by Circlip
Listen Sunbeam, I remember Having to Light grain of wheat bulbs with a taper and put a glass shade round them.


When I was little, dirt was still clean........

I am STILL lighting oil lamps to see by........ and using a stone hammer..... is there another way?

Punch each other's lights out - problem solved - you will both de-lighted.

small.planes
06-28-2009, 03:15 PM
whilst tidying up the workshop I came across my bike lights, which use plumbing parts:

http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn274/small_planes/SSC_5316.jpg
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn274/small_planes/SSC_5317.jpg
This is a 50mm 12V dichroic @50W.
I also used some as patterns to cast alloy ones (in the BBQ):

http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn274/small_planes/SSC_5318.jpg
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn274/small_planes/SSC_5319.jpg

Dave

small.planes
06-28-2009, 03:17 PM
Alloy one fitted with a 35mm 20W dichroic:
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn274/small_planes/SSC_5320.jpg
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn274/small_planes/SSC_5321.jpg

It uses the standard clip on ring to secure the light:
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn274/small_planes/SSC_5323.jpg
And an LED ones:
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn274/small_planes/SSC_5322.jpg

Dave

John Stevenson
06-28-2009, 04:00 PM
Deliver the LED ones Monday night - no excuses :D

isn't it nice living on a tiny island where everyone is 50 minutes away :D :D

small.planes
06-28-2009, 04:32 PM
I could probably walk it in 50 mins....

If SWMBO give a pass out Ill pop over ;)

Dave

Quetico Bob
06-28-2009, 05:04 PM
John
Was actually going to say something smart about forgetting the “P” in your link, until I
Still LMAO. :D

Cheers, Bob

Circlip
06-29-2009, 04:01 AM
Seen some tight ars errrr Frugal solutions in the past Dave, but they're normally from Yorkshire. You got any distant relations up here?? Neat solution.

Regards Ian.

small.planes
06-29-2009, 09:25 AM
Scottish ancestry :p

I made these when I was a student and decent bike lights cost a huge amount.
I used to do a lot of off road riding at night / dusk and not having good lights would mean having an accident :eek:

The plumbing fitting is fortuotus in that the little bevel which holds the o ring seal is just nicely shaped to cup the reflector bit...

The alloy one was all machined using a unimat 4, one of my first 'real' projects.

Dave

Evan
06-29-2009, 09:38 AM
Here is a 20 watt halogen work light I built as the first project on my South Bend when I acquired it in the 80s. All parts were machined on the lathe and the sides of the cube are interchangable. I had forgotten about it until now. I think I will convert it to high output LED for my mill.

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/light1.jpg

John Stevenson
06-29-2009, 04:19 PM
Well Dave, Small Planes came round tonight as ordered and at great personal effort in not accepting a burger, [ may have had something to do with the suds on my hands as I was running the BBQ and the big CNC at the same time ] :D

I am now the proud owner of a shed load of halogen lamps in various voltages, pictures tomorrow - my beer is getting cold.............

.

gellfex
01-11-2011, 06:33 PM
Just received an order of 2 regular medium base 18 LED bulbs for $10 shipped. I have had 2 13w CF's in reflectors on goosenecks on either side of the mill quill, replaced those bulbs and reflectors with these and it's pretty cool! At 10" distance the circle of light is about 5". Some will quibble about the cold light, but their reducing obstruction of the work area and saving 85% of the energy is nice. And I'll never have a shattered CF all over the mill table again.

http://www.meritline.com/18-led-2w-spotlight-321---p-23958.aspx Lots of other cheap Chinese crap here also.

jugs
01-11-2011, 07:07 PM
Deliver the LED ones Monday night - no excuses

isn't it nice living on a tiny island where everyone is 50 minutes away :D

Well you can't get to us in 50 mins :p :D

john
:)

John Stevenson
01-11-2011, 07:49 PM
Well you can't get to us in 50 mins :p :D

john
:)

Of course you can, 50 minutes to the first pub, 50 minutes to the second pub, then another 50 to the third and aim for your place. :rolleyes:

DaHui
02-19-2011, 01:36 PM
The "ring light situation" is a little confusing to me. It seems like that production model is no longer in production. Why not? Price? Performance? Color temperature? Brightness? There were maybe a couple of design challenges (donut hole) that needed to be worked out but I'm surprised this "style" light isn't incredibly popular.

What are you opinions on why they didn't do well?

Alistair Hosie
02-19-2011, 04:42 PM
I too am a great beiever in a lot of lights. I buy them all the time for both my workshops ,but I only have the normal halogen lamps two of shining on my mill..I was told to have about three or four fluorescent lamps for my woodshop I have about twenty or more and still neeed lamps at the machines. Alistair

PeteF
02-19-2011, 06:39 PM
The lighting in my workshop is now quite good, so I don't find I really need extra lighting on the machines. However as 2 of them have it as standard I wired them up. Undoubtably a stupid question, but why are low voltage lights used on machines and not regular line voltage as it may be in different parts of the world? I presume it's safety in case some knucklehead pokes a bit of metal back up into the light, but as my machines are all on RCD protection, they're all simply 230V lights.

Pete

RWO
02-20-2011, 03:28 PM
This is the light on my BP. It is ring mounted and rotates in "hooks" mounted under the head of the mill using existing bolt holes. The light is a 20W reflector halogen fed from a transformer mounted on the back end of the ram.
It swivels about 300 deg. around the head so is readily repositioned. It was made by Dieckmann True Position, Inc. who is long out of business. I think I got one of the last made. It would not be that hard to reproduce. Bending the hollow ring to the proper radius would be the most difficult part to make.
Virtually everything else would be purchased or made in the shop. The installation manual has dwgs of all the parts. If anyone wants a copy let me know and I can email a PDF.

RWO

http://i796.photobucket.com/albums/yy247/RWO_photo/BPmilllight.jpg

miker
02-20-2011, 03:54 PM
Thanks for posting this. PM sent.

Rgds

Mad Scientist
02-20-2011, 09:30 PM
I was using a couple halogen lamps but they would melt the plastic windows to keep chips and oil off of them. Then about a month ago the smoke gods escaped from the transformer that powered them.

To remedy these problems this afternoon I just finished these LED lamps. I used three 1 watt LED's (about $6 each) and their brightness is controlled by an adjustable voltage regulator.

Obviously not as bright as the halogen but way smaller and they don't get hot. I think they going to work out just fine.

http://i68.photobucket.com/albums/i17/mscientist/shop%20pictures/milllit3.jpg

mike4
02-21-2011, 02:45 AM
Yup, that will sort out one or two machines but I have the Bridgy, small TOS, large TOS, CVA and Beaver plus the odd other all with crap lights that need replacing.

As I posted earlier if I'm going down this route I need about 9 new heads.

The light on the big TOS is about 30 years old has has been run over by every truck going thru this postcode, or it looks like it.

The small TOS has more inards hanging out of it than on CSI forensic

9 new quality lights are serious coin.

John,
I have seen several autoelectricians advertising LED work lights , they claim to be 18w led which equate to 40-50 w tungsten lights .
4 are advertised for around $AUD 200.00 , I have orderd a set for my work vehicle to replace the high current incandescent work lights currently fitted ,

I suggest trying you local autoelectricians or Ebay

Michael

dian
02-26-2011, 06:58 AM
i finally created my portable shop light. i put a 55 w xenon bulb into the lamp.

http://i973.photobucket.com/albums/ae218/romandian/lampe006.jpg

the first picture was taken with daylight close to the window. the second one with the lamp on. its really bright.

http://i973.photobucket.com/albums/ae218/romandian/lampe001.jpg

http://i973.photobucket.com/albums/ae218/romandian/lampe002.jpg

unfortunatelly it wont start of the rectifier (needs a lot of current to start) so i have to run it from a battery. not so bad, if i come across an unexpensive small battery, i buy it and attach the lamp to it, so i can carry the whole thing around.

Reed
02-26-2011, 08:16 AM
After seeing a post on these, I bought several of these Ikea LED Desk lights and used a couple for mill lights. They are mounted on mag bases.

Below is a pic of one I put together. Plenty of brightness for my 50+ aging eyes.

- Reed
Raleigh, NC

http://i237.photobucket.com/albums/ff3/rstreifthau/LEDIkeaMillLightsDouble-1s.jpg

http://i237.photobucket.com/albums/ff3/rstreifthau/LEDIkeaMillLightsDouble-2s.jpg

dian
02-26-2011, 01:45 PM
where are the magnetic bases? they are great, will run to ikea on monday and grab some. can see many uses for them. will they hold a dremmel?

Alistair Hosie
02-26-2011, 04:12 PM
What's wrong with the chronos apart from there not very bright :D Alistair ps I have a few of them they aint that bad.Alistair in Scotland also maybe it's out hydro electricity that makes them crap:D AListair

Georgineer
03-01-2011, 07:00 PM
... why are low voltage lights used on machines and not regular line voltage as it may be in different parts of the world? I presume it's safety in case some knucklehead pokes a bit of metal back up into the light...
Pete

Pete,

Undoubtedly safety comes into it, but I suspect the main reason is that a low-voltage filament for a given wattage is thicker than the mains-voltage equivalent. This makes it more robust and better able to withstand vibration and knocks. The filament runs very close to the metal's melting temperature and is much weaker than it is when cold (this is why you should never move projectors, stage lights and the like when they are hot).

George

.RC.
04-28-2011, 06:13 AM
Looking at getting some lights from Deal Extreme to put on some machines...

What sort of lumen output should I be looking at? and also what colour?

HAP
04-28-2011, 03:09 PM
Here is what i did with the empty space you discribed...
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=41613&highlight=cheap+mill+light
HAP

RichardG
04-28-2011, 05:50 PM
On led lights when it says 85 to 265 volts does that mean that they will work anywhere it that voltage range was hoping to use one for yard light and maby in the shop?
Richard