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Too_Many_Tools
04-06-2009, 03:25 AM
Along with the excellent question "Question: How much money invested in your Home Shop?" the next question should be...How much does your Home Shop weigh?..since if you have to move every ounce will need to be transported and that transportation will cost money.

Add up how much your shop weighs..I think you will be surprised.

Gavin
04-06-2009, 03:44 AM
Exactly - last time we moved house I hired a 20' truck and did the job with a couple of mates. The house contents took 1 van load and a couple of 8' x 5' trailer loads. The workshop tools and machines took the best part of 2 truck loads and my steel stocks made another 2 truck loads - and I've bought more stuff since then.

"She Who Must Be Obeyed" and I have agreed that the next move out will be in pine boxes and the kids can work out how to shift the workshop stuff themselves.

Evan
04-06-2009, 04:25 AM
"She Who Must Be Obeyed" and I have agreed that the next move out will be in pine boxes and the kids can work out how to shift the workshop stuff themselves.


Yep, that's our plan too. I will probably kick first and when I do the kids get to fight it out. My son in law really wants the CNC and the lathe, not sure what my son would like. The deal is that to get the good stuff they also have to clean out all my packrat stash.

How much does it all weigh? Low limit must be at least 5 tons

Timleech
04-06-2009, 04:46 AM
Around 13.5 tons of bare machines, not including the 1.5 ton mill which is out of the door looking for a new home.
When scrap was at its peak last year, the scrap price wouldn't have been a mile short of what I paid.


Tim

Doc Nickel
04-06-2009, 06:15 AM
Weight? Good question... My machines aren't all that heavy, being mostly smaller home-shop type stuff. The big mill's a ton (according to the bill of lading, actually 2,012lb) and the horizontal's just under 1,200lb:

http://www.docsmachine.com/machineshop/011-02.jpg

I'm guessing the Logan is around 800 lb, and the Sheldon probably not much more than 1,000. The big shaper, once it's put back together, will probably be an easy ton. The brake lathe is 300+ lb, and the Wells saw is probably 500 with the homebrew roller base....

Machines only? Probably less than 12,000lb at a rough estimate. Tooling? At least 1,500 lb, probably closer to 3,000lb. That big batch of horizontal cutters alone was nearly 600lb. I've probably got well over 100lb in just drill bits.

Hand tools? Very rough guess, another 2,000 to 3,000 lb. I know I have some 300lb in just sockets, and about 200lb in just hammers- including the blacksmithing and bodymans' stuff.

Power tools? (Circular saw, sawzall, etc.) at least another ton. I've got three old all-aluminum wormdrive Skils, half a dozen drills, a few cordless tools, a big armload of pneumatic tools...

Then there's the welders (two MIGs, one TIG, two stick, one gas torch) and the woodworking stuff (12" tablesaw, old bandsaw, etc.) and the big compressor, plus general bits like battery chargers, the parts washer, floor jacks, etc.

So just tools? 25,000 pounds, maybe. Give or take 20%.

Now, material? :D I'd wager I have... between five and ten tons of just scrap, stock and raw material. And I've actually been paring that down some the last few years...

Doc.

andy_b
04-06-2009, 07:06 AM
at LEAST 22,000# and that doesn't include tooling and various other odd items like antique bandsaws or woodworking tools. that would add at least another 6,000#. then again, i have two 5,200# 1928 John Deere D tractors laying around, a 8,000# Oliver OC-46 crawler, and various other smaller antique farm tractors, garden tractors, small engines, etc. i am doing my part to be sure PA stays firmly attached to the planet. :)

andy b.

ammcoman2
04-06-2009, 07:37 AM
WAY TOO MUCH!

Just in the middle of a move and now wish I had remained a micro-machinist. Hoping that this feeling will go away once set up in the new workshop.

The machines are one thing but it is the accesssories that add up big time.

Geoff

Forrest Addy
04-06-2009, 07:57 AM
Hmm. About 46,000 pounds or so. Does that include the stocked materials? Maybe add another 2500. And a couple ton of stuff too good to toss. 12 pounds for the cat

randyjaco
04-06-2009, 09:59 AM
I have moved several times.The last one was a move from California to Texas. I found after some research that the moving van was the cheapest for the big machines along with the household goods. I just put them on pallets and rented a fork lift to load and unload the van. For small tools, material and misc. crap, I rented Uhaul trailers. The move went pretty well. My big old tool chest got dropped and the insurance got me a much nicer new one. I never owned a new tool chest before 8^)

Moving is a PITA but with some fore thought it can be accomplished at a reasonable price. I too am hoping for the pine box next move.

Michael Edwards
04-06-2009, 10:05 AM
Add up how much your shop weighs..I think you will be surprised.


Your're right, I am supprised. I'm over 25000#

ME

MickeyD
04-06-2009, 10:08 AM
My best guess is 22K pounds.

derekm
04-06-2009, 10:25 AM
My crucial issue is related to the total weight, its the loading per square metre.... I couldnt go for really heavy mill because The shop is mounted on concrete beams over a disused but full Swimming pool :eek:
I dont think I'm over 2000kg yet. But thats just whats in the shop - not the stock not the compressor not the hand tools, not the electric tools, not garage tools ...

PS4steam
04-06-2009, 10:32 AM
Well we just moved about 100 miles 2 years ago. The SWMBO and I moved all of it using one of those JLG lift trailers. We kept track of weights and estimated it out at 28K pounds. That included all the shop tools, material, woodshop tools, benches everything. It took us three months. It has taken me almost 2 years to get everything up and running I still have the surface grinder,shaper, and horizontal mill to get going.

My daugther helped put a bench top on one day and I said I was sure glad I was never going to move this stuff again - it was all hers and her husbands. You should have seen the look on her face as she looked around it was priceless. I then showed her were the auctioneers card was, told her just call and collect a check.

Bob

Liger Zero
04-06-2009, 11:21 AM
Maybe two tons, I have all CLARK and Sherline stuff... nothing "serious" as of yet.

Stepside
04-06-2009, 11:31 AM
Thank you for the topic. I am going to print this whole thread and share with the "better half". I am a relative lightweight as I can barely break 10,000 pounds even if I include the cat.

lazlo
04-06-2009, 11:47 AM
since if you have to move every ounce will need to be transported and that transportation will cost money.

I'm worried about that too, especially now that I got the Excello (2900 lbs). I want to move to a house with a detached shop, but it's going to be a bitch moving the lathe and mill again. Hey Mike? :D

The other issue is that there's no way I'd let the moving guys pack my hand tools and metrology stuff (indicators, gauges, blocks, drills, endmills, tap and dies...) -- half that stuff would disappear in the move...

dp
04-06-2009, 11:57 AM
I'm in at around 3,500 lbs. Size matters.

John Stevenson
04-06-2009, 02:43 PM
My crucial issue is related to the total weight, its the loading per square metre.... I couldnt go for really heavy mill because The shop is mounted on concrete beams over a disused but full Swimming pool :eek:


Wow a suds tank to kill for.........................

No idea on weight but the planes landing at East Midlands International about 10 miles away now fly round in a loop as something is affecting their compass's

Tim and myself have to keep in close touch so as not to tip the British isles.

.

andy_b
04-06-2009, 02:51 PM
My crucial issue is related to the total weight, its the loading per square metre.... I couldnt go for really heavy mill because The shop is mounted on concrete beams over a disused but full Swimming pool :eek:
I dont think I'm over 2000kg yet. But thats just whats in the shop - not the stock not the compressor not the hand tools, not the electric tools, not garage tools ...

that would freak me out. i'd always be worried about going out one day and finding things a bit lower and a bit wetter. :)

andy b.

mototed
04-06-2009, 03:10 PM
We have a two story house with basement, moved the shop into the basement and started adding machines over the years, Now we have a one and one half story house. Told the wife that this would save money due to half of the house sinking underground, thus creating a more stable environment during the summer and winter temperature swings. And if I could add a few more machines, we could end up with a nice ranch house that would lower our property taxes and saving even more money.
Ted

Frank Ford
04-06-2009, 03:41 PM
Total weight? Jeez, now that's one I've never considered, just as I've never considered the possibility of moving. I've lived in the same place since I bought it back in the day when a 27-year old with a regular job could buy a 3-bedroom house in downtown Palo Alto for 32 grand. That worked out to $199 a month, including taxes - a manageable amount for folks with modest jobs.

Today, things are so different. Just trading for an equivalent house of the same value could cost me up to $14,000 a year in increased property tax. A young couple just bought the place across the street from me for a cool 1.5 million. I wonder how they do it!

So, I really don't care how much the stuff weighs. A short while ago I "discovered" that you can call a rigging company to haul and place tools, so maybe they can worry about it and the now 65-year old homeowner can relax a bit. I do wish I had the space for about 15 tons more gear, but that just isn't possible here.

Northernsinger
04-06-2009, 03:42 PM
I keep a list. includes estimated weights as well as other information on both wood working and metal working machinery and now is close to 58000 pounds, mostly antiques, mostly stored, does include some tooling. Total cost under $11000 (does not include new shop building).

Fasttrack
04-06-2009, 03:43 PM
22,000 lbs in two bare lathes and a beat up old shaper. Not sure how much the rest of it weighs :D (+73 lbs for the surface plate that arrived today!)

Northernsinger
04-06-2009, 03:45 PM
I'll add that some of this--a fair amount--is stored in a two shops (now used as storage buildings) at a property--house and land and barns--that I bought as a 26 year old in 1976, for 23k, for $8000 down and $143.96 a month.

Northernsinger
04-06-2009, 03:48 PM
By the way, I'm probably light on a fair number of the estimates. I'm reminded of this as I see I have my Excelo (with a 42" table) in my list at 2000pounds and Lazlo--in beautiful Texas--has his at 30 % more, 2900.

The heaviest machine on this list is a 37" Solem drum sander (given to me, I'll never use it, put it at the back of one of the storage buildings, them one with the concrete floor) which has a catalog weright of 7200. I don't know whether, with catalog weights, they were sometimes 1), accurate, 2), sometimes claimed heavy, or 3), sometimes claimed light.

One other thing to note, just for fun: when we had this discussion in the old wood working machine discussion group a few years ago the fellow with the heaviest weight--who indeed had been collecting some nice old wood working machinery--topped the list at over 300,000 pounds (his estimate) as he also collected old earth moving equipment, which mounts up fairly fast.

John Stevenson
04-06-2009, 04:17 PM
Today, things are so different. Just trading for an equivalent house of the same value could cost me up to $14,000 a year in increased property tax.

How does that work ? and what do you get for 14K ?

We pay about 1100 UKP per year for the house and shop combined.
That's civic amenities, parks, libraries swimming pools etc. plus fire brigade, police dustbins and streets swept.

.

Frank Ford
04-06-2009, 04:57 PM
Property tax runs around 1% of assessed value in these parts. 31 years ago the voters in California passed a bill called Proposition 13, which ostensibly was to give relief for older homeowners who might be forced from their homes by the rampant inflation of property values. My home, for example, has appreciated to a figure somewhere in the vicinity of 40 times what I paid for it.

Prop 13 allowed for "stabilizing" the property value based on the current assessment when it was enacted, or the acquisition of property bought after the law was passed. Thus, you pay property tax based on the acquisition cost, which has an extremely small increase each year.

My neighbor of five years pays more than ten times what I pay in property taxes, and people who move in now are subject to higher levies based on the selling price, so they pay even more.

To say Prop 13 is controversial would be an understatement. It certainly reduced tax revenue for the state, and that's no small deal. Some say that's why our state school system is in such trouble. When I went through divorce in 1991, I was able to buy my wife out of her equity in the house and keep the Prop 13 benefit. Simply put, I could not have stayed in my home without Prop 13 keeping my taxes so low.

At this point if I decided to retire and take my Social Security benefits, nearly the entire amount would go to property tax if my home were reassessed in today's market.

Mcgyver
04-06-2009, 05:02 PM
he also collected old earth moving equipment, which mounts up fairly fast.

and I thought machining as a hobby was a bit out there.

obviously a lot nice old iron in your guys shops to be tipping the scales at some of those numbers, I'd guess I'm 12-15k. been gaining weight lately :D

jkilroy
04-06-2009, 05:18 PM
Just machines, somewhere around 18 tons. That is not counting hand tools, stock, benches, tables, workholding, tool holding, etc. I probably have 1000lbs in 50 taper tools, and the gantry crane is another 2500, shoot, forgot the grinders, probably got close to 1000 there as well, so the total is probably between 20 and 25 tons somewhere.

lazlo
04-06-2009, 05:33 PM
My home, for example, has appreciated to a figure somewhere in the vicinity of 40 times what I paid for it.

Frank, you might add, for the UK crowd, that Palo Alto is smack in the middle of Silicon Valley, and some of the most expensive real estate in North America.
That's why almost all the big semi companies have moved their core operations to other cities (Intel to Beaverton, AMD to Austin, etc...) -- even well-paid, senior employees can't afford to move there.

Gorgeous area, by the way, but between the outlandish real estate prices, insane traffic, and high state taxes, I'd much rather commute there from Austin :)

Frank Ford
04-06-2009, 06:09 PM
oops, duplicate post

Frank Ford
04-06-2009, 06:09 PM
Frank, you might add, for the UK crowd, that Palo Alto is smack in the middle of Silicon Valley, and some of the most expensive real estate in North America.
That's why almost all the big semi companies have moved their core operations to other cities (Intel to Beaverton, AMD to Austin, etc...) -- even well-paid, senior employees can't afford to move there.

Gorgeous area, by the way, but between the outlandish real estate prices, insane traffic, and high state taxes, I'd much rather commute there from Austi

Right you are - I sometimes forget that bit. I was born here, and it seems obvious now that I'll die here, too.

What amazes me is that when I travel I see so many people who live so far from home. . .

(Nyuk, nyuk)

derekm
04-06-2009, 06:36 PM
that would freak me out. i'd always be worried about going out one day and finding things a bit lower and a bit wetter. :)

andy b.
Yes, I had that feeling for quite a few months. It was quite spooky taking the mill in there for the first time on the pallet truck (no I didnt wear a PFD :) ). I've stopped worrying about it now, but when I sweep the floor I still look for cracks :D.

I did a stress analysis of the beams and it came out ok but I didnt put them in there so I have no idea how good a job was done? or what the screed loading is. The building structure is located to put the load direct on the pool walls. Oh yeah and mucho crossed fingers

Doc Nickel
04-06-2009, 06:39 PM
Frank, you might add, for the UK crowd, that Palo Alto is smack in the middle of Silicon Valley, and some of the most expensive real estate in North America.

-Yep. I recall that, in the middle of the "dot-com boom" in the late ninties, there were literally hundreds of young coders and software geeks in the Valley that were worth tens of millions- on paper- but couldn't even rent an efficiency apartment because there were either none to be had, or because they couldn't afford it, even on a six-figure salary. (As opposed to their stock options.)

So you'd see newspaper articles about this 23 year old kid, making a quarter-mil a year, and owning stock options worth tens of millions, sleeping in his '85 hatchback.

That's a fair part of the reason some many of the tech industries, like Google, have such extensive on-site "perk" facilities, including private full baths, laundry facilities, and even what amounts to hotel rooms, as well as full cafeterias and the like.

Bit I digress. :D

Doc.

aostling
04-06-2009, 07:19 PM
One hundred kilograms. That included tools and textbooks, and a few odds and ends.

That was in 1978, when I repatriated after living in New Zealand for seven years. Ocean liners and steamer trunks had ceased to exist after 1974, so I opted to mail my possessions back to North America. The maximum package weight was 10 kg, and I mailed ten of these.

I owned a lot more, including a Stanley steam engine, when I lived in this Palo Alto house at Tennyson & Alma, from 1966-71. The rent was $115/month and never changed. This is a recent photo -- I am surprised that a one-bedroom house still exists in Frank Ford's town of multi-million-dollar bungalows.

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/111Tennyson.jpg

Frank Ford
04-06-2009, 07:36 PM
Yep, I lived in a one-bedroom in those days - it's on Margarita, about three blocks from my where my business is now. Lots of places like that around town, but they are a dying breed, falling to the dozer and spec builder. In late 1971, the rent was on its way from $150 to $180, so we made the move to buy a place. Our landlord was a realtor, so the rent went up as soon as anybody's.

Roy Andrews
04-06-2009, 11:33 PM
i have moved twice in the last 3 years so i have a pretty good idea how much junk i have. 7600 lb scrap metal/ stock and rough cut lumber. big mill weighs 9600lb bare according to K&T. but machine tools welding tools and wood tools where 31,000lb in three trips with my 3 axle equipment trailer. another 12,000 in cabinets hand tools and misc shop crap. 13,800 for cat D4 and 12600 for the backhoe. 2800 for bikes, four wheeler and lawn equipment. for a total of 79,800 of my crap. wifes crap (the house) was 5200. all this moved by me and wife with my f350 and 24ft enclosed trailer and 3 axle equipment trailer.

Teenage_Machinist
04-07-2009, 12:55 PM
About 500 pounds? I forget how much the accursed drill press weighs. Not much. THe lathe is 250, the mill is 100.

carlquib
04-07-2009, 01:44 PM
I am right at about 30,000 just machine weight. I have no idea how heavy all the other stuff is but since I am in the process of moving I know it is heavy. I have had to be careful so I could pick up the boxes. The worst part is that I had half my shop in the basement. Going to take a little while to get the lathes, mills and grinders back up the stairs. Down was easy, but up is proving to be more difficult but at least the heaviest thing downstairs is only about 1600 pounds.http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/images/icons/icon11.gif

-brian

madman
04-07-2009, 01:47 PM
We are in the 17,845 pound range currently with a new lathe coming shortly and hopefully a tormach???(not sure yet0 cnc Mill

j king
04-07-2009, 06:55 PM
Guessing about 25000.Boy it adds up. :)

John Stevenson
04-07-2009, 07:19 PM
Just re read the title " How much does your home shop weigh ?"

So decided to do some numbers.
Baldwin imperial bricks weigh 4.0 pounds each and there are 100 to a square yard building double wall.

So allowing just 3 walls and no returns that works out to # 102,664 pounds of bricks.

Clay pan tiles weigh 2.0 pounds each and take 30 to do a square yard so that's # 6,400 pounds of tiles.

Then reckon #1,000 pounds of timber for rafters, purlings etc and the total comes to # 110,064 pounds approx or 49 tons

Ooops, forgot the floor because I haven't seen it for a long while.
That adds another 68,870 pounds or approx 30 tons so all in we are looking at 79 tons.


.

Evan
04-07-2009, 08:53 PM
You can throw in a kilo for every cubic meter of air. :rolleyes:

Doc Nickel
04-07-2009, 09:17 PM
You can throw in a kilo for every cubic meter of air.

-Yeah, but hot air weighs less. :D

Doc.

TECHSHOP
04-07-2009, 09:38 PM
I try to limit any single "item" in the shop to an approximate "half-ton".

All I need to do is finish counting before all this treasure rusts away...

Mcgyver
04-07-2009, 11:45 PM
I try to limit any single "item" in the shop to an approximate "half-ton".

...


...the knee, the column, the table, head, the bed, tailstock......

pretty much everyone but Fastrack could live with those rules :D

JRouche
04-08-2009, 02:29 AM
Ummm I dont know. A three car garage filled with metal in some form. Gotta weigh a couple pounds.. JR

Too_Many_Tools
04-11-2009, 07:32 PM
Along with the excellent question "Question: How much money invested in your Home Shop?" the next question should be...How much does your Home Shop weigh?..since if you have to move every ounce will need to be transported and that transportation will cost money.

Add up how much your shop weighs..I think you will be surprised.

While on this subject, does anyone know what it costs to transport a "pound" any significant distance?

TMT