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madman
04-10-2009, 06:32 PM
I found a super nice Standard Modern radial Arm Drill for sale. It is a one horsepower 600 volt 3 phase motor on it. Now what is the best way to run this thing from 220 volt single phase? i looked googled it and got nothing for 600 volt. Does that mean i need to addd a transformer? thanx Guys Mike

Carld
04-10-2009, 08:01 PM
Use a transformer or check with a motor shop to see if they can rewire it.

doctor demo
04-10-2009, 10:25 PM
I found radial Arm Drill for sale. It is a one horsepower 600 volt 3 phaseNow what is the best way to run this thing from 220 volt single phase? Guys Mike


My opinion , a one horse (or larger) 220 volt single phase motor.

Steve

oldtiffie
04-10-2009, 10:34 PM
I found a super nice Standard Modern radial Arm Drill for sale. It is a one horsepower 600 volt 3 phase motor on it. Now what is the best way to run this thing from 220 volt single phase? i looked googled it and got nothing for 600 volt. Does that mean i need to addd a transformer? thanx Guys Mike

Mike,

anything "electrical" is my weak subject, but having said that it seems that you have to either convert your single phase 220v supply to 3 phase 600v supply to use that motor.

I would be surprised if a 230>600v single phase transformer will do the job. I'd guess that you will have to have a 1>3 phase conversion in there somewhere as well if you are going to use that motor.

I have a similar power arrangement to yours (230v 50~ 1ph) in Australia (OZ). I have a 2-phase supply (60amps per phase), so I'd opt for using a 230 volt single phase motor - probably 2 HP or more. They are available on some compressors here.

Tobias-B
04-10-2009, 10:35 PM
Yipes- 600v 3- phase... that probably won't even have much
lower- voltage windings, I fear.

Usually I'd try to keep the original motor, but over 440, it gets really pricey.

t

JoeFin
04-10-2009, 10:42 PM
Madman

You must be up in Canada where they have 575 volt systems. You might want to check that motor out a little closer as I would be surprised if the manufacturer did not make it a multi-tap or multi-voltage motor.

Either way getting a new motor at the Flea Market or off Ebone is still a lot cheaper and a lot less hassle then purchasing/wiring a transformer.

Mcgyver
04-10-2009, 11:33 PM
Mike, having just gone through this (with transformer and 10hp 3p motor sitting on garage floor to prove it :) ), there are basically two ways that make sense.

1. 240 --> single phase transformer --> 600V then a VFD (you do a rotary converter here, but might hard/expensive for the HV caps) to get it three phase

or

2. 240 --> rotary converter ---> 3phase transformer.

if you have 1 machine, #1 is easier and cheaper - the single phase transformers are supposed to be more plentiful.

I went the second as i have lots of 3phase machines that I've running on a static converter which isn't a very good way to do it....now I'll be rotary converter for everything and step up for the 600 stuff

you're down southern ontario way right? I can hook you up with the guys in Kitchener who have all this stuff surplus.

PS, agree if the motor is easily swappable go that route, not always easy though if the motor's semi built in like an xlo mill or something

cuemaker
04-11-2009, 12:02 AM
this brings up a question of my own...

Say a machine has a 1hp 3 phase motor... does a 1hp 1phase motor cross ok? I assume that HP is the same no matter the phase....

or is it not as simple as putting in a new motor?

hardtail
04-11-2009, 01:31 AM
No doubt 3 phase power is better and smoother for loads, especially as they get larger. On a 1 hp application depending on the motor/frame/mount scenario I don't think you'll loose much going to single phase, it's likely is your easiest option here to swap motors.

Arcane
04-11-2009, 01:32 AM
doctor demo and Mcgyver and oldtiffie have the best ideas, with doctor demo's being the cheapest and easiest solution.
As many many threads in the past have pointed out, it's always a balance between cost, necessity, and practicality. There is alot to be said for going the full blown 3 phase route and you might find exchanging the 600V motor for a 240V three phase one in conjunction with a VFD to be more practical than having a transformer to step up the voltage to 600V. As far as I know, you can't get 3 phase from single phase by using a transformer...all you can do is change the voltage.

Sparky_NY
04-11-2009, 07:09 AM
The saw is a radial arm saw, that thickens the plot, their motors are usually extremely non standard due to their mounting methods and the blade mounting directly on the shaft.

I suppose a 230 - 575V transformer could be used along with a roto phase to drive its primary. It would get pretty pricey fast.

Now we know why the saw is a deal.

J Tiers
04-11-2009, 08:17 AM
The saw is a radial arm saw, that thickens the plot, their motors are usually extremely non standard due to their mounting methods and the blade mounting directly on the shaft.

I suppose a 230 - 575V transformer could be used along with a roto phase to drive its primary. It would get pretty pricey fast.

Now we know why the saw is a deal.


I found a super nice Standard Modern radial Arm Drill for sale.

;)

Everything 600V is more expensive, even the wire, as 300V wire is very available, 600V not quite as common, depending. Plus, the "extra stuff" factor is a lot higher with transformers and RPCs etc.

Eitehr put in a 220V single phase, or use this opportunity to start your shop on 3 phase, but at 220V...... with an RPC and 220 3phase motor.

hardtail
04-11-2009, 08:51 AM
Well your wire size/contactors/controls even motor are much smaller due to the decreased current carrying of comparable lower voltage.......you win some/you lose some.........LOL

studentjim
04-11-2009, 09:13 AM
Unless it's a built in senario where a retrofit is impossible, I'd change to a 2hp single phase as the cheapest route

madman
04-27-2009, 05:21 PM
Some motors are a unusual design . It is always possible to do this or that BUT whats the simplest and quickest? thats the question. I was going to have this motor rewound for One phase but its 500 bucks Oh well Mike

Mcgyver
04-27-2009, 05:46 PM
Mike, go back and check out my post, those are the two ways of doing it and #1 is the cheaper of the two, while #2 is a more universal solution....as i said i can tell you who to call in Kitchener (I'm thinking you're down that way?) to get used stuff, ie cheap, for either approach

Jeffw5555
04-27-2009, 05:50 PM
I would start by checking surplus places for a 240 to 600 V 3 phase transformer. That isn't a super common item, (240 to 460 being the most common) but there's not much demand for them so the price might be cheap.

My father just sold out his surplus biz; he had a lot of these 3 phase transformers in that range, so I can't recommend you ask him....:)

If you can get one cheap, then powering it with a rotary phase converter is a no brainer.

Steve Steven
04-27-2009, 08:53 PM
My friend Frank had a similiar problem, he got a Colchester lathe with a Canadian 575V 3 phase motor on it. It came with a 220 to 600V three phase transformer, we built a rotary phase converter and it all worked out, except the voltage is a bit high.

The transformer is a Canadian built unit, I don't remember the name of the company.

Steve