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View Full Version : is this not expensive for what it is??



Alistair Hosie
04-12-2009, 05:26 PM
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/PULTRA-LATHE-IN-EXCELLENT-WORKING-CONDITION_W0QQitemZ260389345149QQcmdZViewItemQQptZ UK_Home_Garden_PowerTools_SM?hash=item260389345149&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_trkparms=72%3A1688%7C66%3A4%7C65%3A12%7C39%3A1%7C 240%3A1318



I think it is Alistair

dockrat
04-12-2009, 05:34 PM
I would think so. I think this is kinda rich also....even with 5K of tooling

http://vancouver.en.craigslist.ca/tls/1118102519.html

Liger Zero
04-12-2009, 05:42 PM
It's a bit small but it does come with a lot of stuff.

Maybe the seller jacked the price to cover the cost of the new Ebay fees.

Highpower
04-12-2009, 05:49 PM
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/PULTRA-LATHE-IN-EXCELLENT-WORKING-CONDITION_W0QQitemZ260389345149QQcmdZViewItemQQptZ UK_Home_Garden_PowerTools_SM?hash=item260389345149&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_trkparms=72%3A1688%7C66%3A4%7C65%3A12%7C39%3A1%7C 240%3A1318

I think it is Alistair
Not too far off from this one: http://cgi.ebay.com/New-Unused-Mini-Precision-Watchmaker-Lathe_W0QQitemZ280331637933QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_D efaultDomain_0?hash=item280331637933&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_trkparms=72%3A1326|66%3A2|65%3A12|39%3A1|240%3A13 08|301%3A1|293%3A2|294%3A50 (http://cgi.ebay.com/New-Unused-Mini-Precision-Watchmaker-Lathe_W0QQitemZ280331637933QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_D efaultDomain_0?hash=item280331637933&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_trkparms=72%3A1326%7C66%3A2%7C65%3A12%7C39%3A1%7C 240%3A1308%7C301%3A1%7C293%3A2%7C294%3A50)

But then again, most clock/watch repair tooling is on the expensive side... :eek:

J Tiers
04-12-2009, 06:24 PM
I suspect that second one is really a chinese import...... "sincere brand"? Oh, yeah.

The first one seems to be actually well outfitted, although there is no pivot polisher with it, which the other one has, and I think the seller has no idea what a "wax chuck" looks like, I didn't see any. (I DID see 5 wheel chucks, which is half a set)

While I got about 2/3 of that much stuff with the Boley I bought used, for $25, the new price would be fairly high.......

philbur
04-12-2009, 06:32 PM
The second one has a name plate saying "prescision lathe" that is any thing but precisely positioned.

Phil

Highpower
04-12-2009, 06:36 PM
I suspect that second one is really a chinese import...... "sincere brand"? Oh, yeah.
Sssshhhhhh...... you're not supposed to notice that! Or the wrinkle paint.... or the fact that it does not come with the motor.... ;)

aboard_epsilon
04-12-2009, 06:42 PM
pultra were made by smart and brown in the UK ..
they are a collectors lathe, much sought after .

They are still made by a company in the uk called Bracehand in Biggleswade

There is one going near you in Edinburgh Alister ...3000 plus ...but its a really nice one with cabinet .

all the best.markj

old-biker-uk
04-13-2009, 03:47 AM
In a word - yes.
I put together my 1570 (similar amount of accessories) with a Mardrive unit for less than half that.
Mark

Peter.
04-13-2009, 05:29 AM
The power switch looks like a handy swarf-collector :)

Liger Zero
04-13-2009, 07:21 AM
What is a "wax chuck?"

J Tiers
04-13-2009, 08:50 AM
What is a "wax chuck?"

Prior to collets, the watch part was centered in a sort of cup, in which a wax-like material was used to hold the part. The wax was heated to insert and center the part, and when it cooled, the work was done with the wax holding the part.

The cup was accurately drilled with a type of conical center hole at the back, and the end of the part rested in that. The forward portion of the part extends out and is centered up until it does not wobble.

never used one, sounds like a real pain

Alistair Hosie
04-13-2009, 10:03 AM
Thanks mark whatever you do don't buy the one in Edinburgh for me old pal I'd rather you just gave me the money:DAlistair

Ries
04-13-2009, 11:39 AM
Here in the USA, we see similar things with Unimats- while you can still stumble on one at a garage sale once in a while for $200, the good ones, tooled up, cost a fortune.

Now, to me, a Unimat is a cute toy, which wont do anything I want, there are guys who love em, and gladly pay hundreds for each little accessory.

Collectors markets are never logical.

PeteM
04-13-2009, 11:45 AM
And, had the lathe said "Levin" rather than "Pultra" it might have fetched twice as much with all the collets and extras.

J Tiers
04-13-2009, 10:38 PM
And, had the lathe said "Levin" rather than "Pultra" it might have fetched twice as much with all the collets and extras.

For a reference, check the price of a very basic Levin..............

http://levinlathe.com/menu.htm

Norman Atkinson
04-14-2009, 03:03 AM
I sold my Pultra 1750 for 500. It was virtually unused and with 23X10mm collets and 3 jaw.

Actually, I made a huge profit of 315 on it.

What has to be remembered is that this is a small, instrument lathe and is a 'plain lathe' with no screwcutting facilities.

Oddly, I still have my watchmakers lathe ---which cost 40.

Don't use it either!

Unless one has USE for such- well, let's fly a kite or play marbles or something equaLLY constructive.

Which reminds me-- I must get a battery for my gold omega!
Which reminds me that I have an E-mail to respond to.
Came from the apprentice to the late chairman or president of the British Horological Society- both are/ were old mates!
Which reminds me that there is NO money in watchmaking or clock making.

Alistair- you're living in the past.

Cheers

Norm

speedy
04-14-2009, 03:27 AM
Actually, I made a huge profit of 315 on it.
Which reminds me that there is NO money in watchmaking or clock making.
Cheers Norm

Hello Norm. Setting up potential horologists (with tooling) looks reasonably lucrative though mate.

Liger Zero
04-14-2009, 07:46 AM
Prior to collets, the watch part was centered in a sort of cup, in which a wax-like material was used to hold the part. The wax was heated to insert and center the part, and when it cooled, the work was done with the wax holding the part.

The cup was accurately drilled with a type of conical center hole at the back, and the end of the part rested in that. The forward portion of the part extends out and is centered up until it does not wobble.

never used one, sounds like a real pain

That's an understatement. I can see at least four reasons that would be a serious pain in the %(*&(!...

How the heck do you keep the wax "gripped" to the part so there is no slippage?

Norman Atkinson
04-14-2009, 09:00 AM
Obviously, Liger Old Son, the wax is not the sort that uses a wick.

Ho! Ho! Ho!

Alister- not worth the candle.

I burn the candle at both ends. It will not last the night. But Oh my friends and oh, my foes--- it gives a lovely light.

Is it Ogden Nash? The guy who had a pencil and a horse.

There's a resin for most things-- even me. Stick around.

Norm

Alistair Hosie
04-14-2009, 12:16 PM
Norm you have it correct I live in the past you keep well my friend :DAlistair

J Tiers
04-14-2009, 08:01 PM
That's an understatement. I can see at least four reasons that would be a serious pain in the %(*&(!...

How the heck do you keep the wax "gripped" to the part so there is no slippage?

The wax does the gripping. With hand-held gravers, and potentially a foot-driven lathe, the forces are not so huge.

Liger Zero
04-14-2009, 08:15 PM
The wax does the gripping. With hand-held gravers, and potentially a foot-driven lathe, the forces are not so huge.
Now it makes sense.

Yes I'm used to MORE POWER situations and ridged setups, not foot-speed and hand tools. :)

Very cool.

Norman Atkinson
04-15-2009, 02:56 AM
Liger,
This wax chuck thing is NOT playing about with foot operated lathes.
Maybe Jerry has one that came over in the Mayflower but I saw my last one in - 1941. Pearl Harbor time!!!!!!!!!!!

What was missed was something like the following recipe
Rosin( resin) 1 Part, Beeswax 4 parts and paraffin( candle) wax 4 parts.
This will stick grinder disks but a tougher 'cement' is from more rosin( resin) and less softer waxes.

I have missed out the recipes with added frogs, toads and assorted incantations. Obviously, such ingredients may not be readily available on you side of the pond.

For those who really want to dig into classical engineering, friend Holzapfell is still in re-print. And for those who think that this is more hyperbole, a Holzapfell lathe will set you back about half the gold in Fort Knox.

Norm

J Tiers
04-15-2009, 08:53 AM
Now it makes sense.

Yes I'm used to MORE POWER situations and ridged setups, not foot-speed and hand tools. :)

Very cool.

As a matter of fact, the lathe might even be a pair of centers in a frame held in a vise.

The power comes from a "bow" with the string wrapped around a pulley clamped to the work, which is held between the centers. You work the bow with one hand while working the graver with the other.

Never done that either, I suspect the wax to be one of the more speedy portions of the process. (wax not used between centers, obviously)

However, it is a very practical way to achieve very good precision with relatively low-tech tools.

All-in-all, the lathe starts to look much better even at that price, which isn't really that high, despite screaming deals obtained by some.

oil mac
04-15-2009, 01:44 PM
Hi Alistair,
If you were in the horological trade the cost is not bad, that said, i do not think that particular little machine is in the first flush of youth,, The ones from the late 50/s, were more streamlined and had a really nice drive system, called a Marr drive, which has a clutch , and gives more speeds, better control etc Some years back, i sold one as i had it lying around for 15 years &never used it, They are a specialist machine, Nice for tiny stuff