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DaHui
04-15-2009, 11:58 AM
Hi all,

I realize that this is a loaded question but....I'm looking at a Hardinge HLV-H

* 1977
* Machine has original paint and looks very clean, used in a home shop
* I might have to buy it sight unseen, it's a very long drive from my house
* Price is 8k

I've looked on ebay and similar machines seem to be going for a lot more.

Assuming the lathe is sound, is this really a good price, and is there anything I should know about the HLV-H? I saw one in person yesterday at an auction and I'm pretty excited about getting my hands on one. Should have bought the one at the auction for 6.5k but I didn't really know what I was looking at. I did a bunch of research so I'm familiar with the general specs etc. but I'm wondering about things I might 'not' know from reading on the internet.

thanks in advance

MickeyD
04-15-2009, 12:17 PM
If it is really in that good of condition, it sounds like a good deal. Those are really nice machines (not as beautiful as a Monarch 10EE) that command a high price. Coming out of a home shop, rigging is always a consideration.
Do you have a way to safely lift and load the machine (one that hopefully a horror freight engine hoist)?

hitnmiss
04-15-2009, 12:18 PM
I have an '83 Feeler (HLV-H copy)

Only real negative I can see is the center to center distance is quite limited compared to the SB9 it replaced, but the 1.5" through spindle elevated most of that (for me at least)

lowest speed is about 110rpm which is faster than my SB but with the high speed threading capability of the HLV it's never been a factor.

Is the 1977 a taper chuck mount? Personally a threaded chuck would be a slight negative over the taper chuck mount. Although threaded chucks on Ebay are a lot cheaper than taper chucks.

I pinch bar'd mine off the trailer, drug it to the wall in my shop and turned a 6" long piece of aluminum. I measured .00005" taper across 6" with no attempt at leveling.

lazlo
04-15-2009, 12:59 PM
If it is really in that good of condition, it sounds like a good deal. Those are really nice machines (not as beautiful as a Monarch 10EE)

The 10EE was designed in the early 1930's, and was on the market in 1939. The Hardinge is a much more modern design, which is why they sell for substantially more than a 10EE does.

$8K for a late-model HLV-H in great condition, is a good deal, IMHO.

DaHui
04-15-2009, 03:24 PM
The description says "cam nose." Does this make sense for an HLV?

lazlo
04-15-2009, 03:28 PM
D1-3 camlock spindle.

aboard_epsilon
04-15-2009, 03:56 PM
i wouldn't travel more than 100 miles if he don't send lots of pictures of it ..that's the only tip i can give.

all the best.markj

Spin Doctor
04-15-2009, 04:07 PM
D1-3 camlock spindle.

Could be. But then some people I've worked with refered to the pin slot on the taper as the cam slot. IMO for a HLV-H/EM I'd want the 4D taper nose as accesory stuff like step collet closers are a lot more common in the taper nose.

rmw
04-15-2009, 04:40 PM
I bought a 74 model at an auction with only very poor grainy photos. Paid 6500 for the machine with no accessories. Like already said, it's heavier than you think, and not particularly easy to move around due to its unusual footing.
It is extremely accurate and easy to use. It is not a good only lathe if you do some larger work (I have a 15x30), and I have not enjoyed working between centers much. One other consideration is voltage. Be sure what it is - I run mine on a 230v rotary phase converter. Accessories are very plentiful. I have found complete collet sets with squares and hex, 3 jaw, 4 jaw, faceplate, steady and follower, radius jig, and taper attachment. I would go for it.
Greg

Milacron of PM
04-15-2009, 05:39 PM
D1-3 camlock spindle.
Nope, Hardinge taper spindle

lazlo
04-15-2009, 05:47 PM
D1-3 camlock spindle was available as an option for the HLV-H Don.

quasi
04-15-2009, 06:15 PM
both the HLVH and the 10EE are still supposedly available new from the factory. The 10EE is double the price of a HLVH.

chrsbrbnk
04-15-2009, 06:45 PM
The problem we have had with them is clutch stuff. mostly from bozo's pushing them to hard. if they were using water based coolant it can get under the bed wipers and make a mess might be worth asking about. and its a little bit of work to regrind the bed but totally do-able. the metric/english dial thing can get gooped up but ussally just needs cleaning and the little cam locs for the compound get ruined but are easy to make ( same aforementioned bozo stuff)

Milacron of PM
04-15-2009, 06:50 PM
D1-3 camlock spindle was available as an option for the HLV-H Don.
I've seen literally hundreds of HLV-H's over the decades and never seen a single one with D1-3 spindle. Maybe this will be the first, but somehow I doubt it.

Milacron of PM
04-15-2009, 06:53 PM
both the HLVH and the 10EE are still supposedly available new from the factory. The 10EE is double the price of a HLVH.
For price comparison purposes of new lathes, the 10EE doesn't "count" really, as it's not really a new lathe but rather a "remanufacture" of an already manufactured machine. A "new" 10EE isn't so much a "manufactured" machine as a finely crafted reconstruction.

DaHui
04-15-2009, 07:06 PM
Does this photo mean anything to anyone? This is the actual machine. I'm not clear how you would mount a chuck on here unless that whole nose comes off. I've mainly been able to find photos of the pin/slot type but not this one.

http://i19.ebayimg.com/05/i/001/3f/cc/2a93_1.JPG

Milacron of PM
04-15-2009, 07:12 PM
Does this photo mean anything to anyone? This is the actual machine. I'm not clear how you would mount a chuck on here unless that whole nose comes off. I've mainly been able to find photos of the pin/slot type but not this one.

<img src="http://i19.ebayimg.com/05/i/001/3f/cc/2a93_1.JPG" />
The black part you are looking at is the coolant guard for the spindle....held on by friction, this pulls right off to reveal the actual spindle...which most of the time will be Hardinge taper, but occasionally is threaded.

aboard_epsilon
04-15-2009, 07:15 PM
think it has the spindle nose protector on in that shot ..

which means its protecting the threaded nose..when used for collet work

also..i think he's on about a collet closer not cam lock

also the bare cast iron isnt as bright and shiny as i woiuld expect to see on an $8000 lathe

all the best.markj

chrsbrbnk
04-16-2009, 06:59 PM
they all come with the spindle shield every one just tosses it in the corner, see if you can get a pic of the way condition

Milacron of PM
04-16-2009, 08:17 PM
they all come with the spindle shield every one just tosses it in the corner, Speak for yourself... I kept mine in place all the time unless I was changing chucks alot. The guard makes a world of difference in lessening coolant splatter when doing close up collet work.

Milacron of PM
04-16-2009, 08:22 PM
see if you can get a pic of the way condition On an HLV-H a picture of the ways typically won't tell you much unless they are reaaaaallly bad. I've seen some fairly nice looking HLV-H's where the ways "appeared" perfect but had a surprising amount of wear near the headstock when subjected to the "pull up on the apron" test.

Spin Doctor
04-16-2009, 09:30 PM
Speak for yourself... I kept mine in place all the time unless I was changing chucks alot. The guard makes a world of difference in lessening coolant splatter when doing close up collet work.

Plus keeping it in place when using collets is basically a good idea anyways as it will help prevent accidental damage to the spindle nose