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KyMike
04-17-2009, 01:26 AM
The power in my neighborhood has been off for about a week twice in the past 6 months, and when I saw a good buy on a used Coleman lantern with several spare mantles, I grabbed it for future emergency use. I'm not experienced with these lamps and was wondering if they need that expensive fuel that Coleman sells, or will regular unleaded gas work? Gasoline here contains some sort of pollution control additive. At one time it had something called MTBE-TAME in it, but supposedly that was turning up in the groundwater and they took it out. I don't know what they use now. Also are these lamps safe to operate indoors?

Mike

dp
04-17-2009, 01:46 AM
The definitive guide to liquid fuel lamps and lanterns is a site I host. I have no part in its operation except to be sure it's always on line:

http://www.lampguild.org/

There is a searchable archive that I installed with great difficulty, and there is a good amount of information regarding appropriate fuels for a great many Coleman products. If the archives fail to turn up anything you can ask a question of the lamp guild experts. I'm continuously amazed at the zeal and expertise these folks have for all things to do with lamps. One of my more entertaining customers. Don't mention EBAY!!!

barts
04-17-2009, 01:58 AM
The power in my neighborhood has been off for about a week twice in the past 6 months, and when I saw a good buy on a used Coleman lantern with several spare mantles, I grabbed it for future emergency use. I'm not experienced with these lamps and was wondering if they need that expensive fuel that Coleman sells, or will regular unleaded gas work? Gasoline here contains some sort of pollution control additive. At one time it had something called MTBE-TAME in it, but supposedly that was turning up in the groundwater and they took it out. I don't know what they use now. Also are these lamps safe to operate indoors?

Mike

Given the additives in unleaded gas, I'd steer clear. One used to be able to buy "white gas" (unleaded w/o additives); Coleman fuel is a refined low-octane gasoline w/o any additives. It keeps much better than regular gasoline, and won't varnish up in the tank. However, unleaded _will_ work.

One gallon of fuel will last a _long_ time in a lantern - 30 to 60 hours/gallon.

These lamps do consume oxygen, and will create carbon monoxide. With care, they can be used in a house, but NOT in an enclosed space or w/ animals or kids. They WILL flare up if mistreated. You would be far safer w/ a 15W florescent light, a small $15 inverter and car battery; you can always recharge it w/ a car.

- Bart

JS
04-17-2009, 02:00 AM
We always used unleaded , but ideally you would want white gas as a fuel.
It is a cleaner fuel so I have been told. They did make 2 types of lanterns one for gasoline and one for Coleman fuel . AS for using it inside I would not recommend it .


Kerosene lantern

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=288B700&categoryid=1015

Dual fuel Gas and Kerosene

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=295A700&categoryid=1015

KyMike
04-17-2009, 02:55 AM
Wow, new Coleman lamps are a lot more expensive than I thought. I paid $16 for mine. I had no idea there were lamp collectors but I will see what I can find out about them on that lampguild site. Thanks all, for the replies.

Mike

garyphansen
04-17-2009, 09:34 PM
Anyone care to explain how or why the mantels become Radio Active? Gary P. Hansen

aostling
04-17-2009, 09:43 PM
Anyone care to explain how or why the mantels become Radio Active? Gary P. Hansen

I think the mantle incorporates "thoriated silk."

Those old Coleman lanterns are a scourge of any campground. They are as bright as the sun and ruin the wilderness experience for any nearby campers who came out to enjoy a night sky. The only thing worse is having to listen to a generator.

dp
04-17-2009, 09:56 PM
Thorium hasn't been used in mantels for a long time (USA). Yttrium is preferred now. They're not as bright but seem to last longer.

madman
04-17-2009, 10:23 PM
Well i just put unleaded gasoline in My Lanterns,. I have had a mess of people run away as i overfilled the lantern coated the picnic table a bit and when i lit her up it was a bit flamish but quickly died down all on its own.. Luckily (and ive done the same thing many many times) no one died while i lit the darn thing up while out Moose Hunting. It (unleaded) seemed to burn extremely well in my coleman Lantern. Theres nothing like the ambience of a Coleman Lantern when its October evening 9 pm and light is nice to have.

kendall
04-17-2009, 11:01 PM
Same here, White gas was the best fuel I'd say, but unleaded is the current best.
Never was happy with the way coleman fuel ran, harder to light and doesn't seem as bright in a lantern, or as hot in a stove.

I have an old optimus backpack stove designed for white gas, tried coleman fuel in it once and it was about useless. Near as I can tell the coleman fuel doesn't vaporize as readily so the optimus was always low on pressure

Ken.

wtrueman
04-18-2009, 02:13 AM
Wow!! You guys are adventurous! Up here 8$ for a gallon of this stuff is not bad. More expensive are the mantles. I bought as many as I could in England when over there. BE REALLY careful when spilling this stuff. Youcould be the next Roman Candle!! Wayne.

Peter.
04-18-2009, 03:21 AM
The definitive guide to liquid fuel lamps and lanterns is a site I host. I have no part in its operation except to be sure it's always on line:

http://www.lampguild.org/

There is a searchable archive that I installed with great difficulty, and there is a good amount of information regarding appropriate fuels for a great many Coleman products. If the archives fail to turn up anything you can ask a question of the lamp guild experts. I'm continuously amazed at the zeal and expertise these folks have for all things to do with lamps. One of my more entertaining customers. Don't mention EBAY!!!

I found a lamp once, sold it on eBay and shipped it to a guy in Australia - the shipping was almost as much as the lamp. The guy who bought it was over-the-moon happy and it was a real bargain for him (and a good deal for me sinc eI paid nothng for it). The one I sold him was a huge paraffin Tilley spotlamp from the '40s or '50s and was brand new - never been lit. He had a collection of about 140 Tilley lamps. He said he was a mambaer of some lamplighters guild in Aus.

dp
04-18-2009, 03:37 AM
The gripe the guild members have with Ebay is that people will get on, create an account, ask a question, and then post the exact response in their Ebay listing, usually getting more money than had they not. The guild runs on donations, and they pay me a small fortune for all the work I do for them (very small fortune). But --- every one of them will buy lamps from Ebay :)

I like to see the lamps in person before considering a purchase. I'd like to get an old Student's Lamp in good condition but they're getting rare/expensive. Word to the wise - never "electrocute" an oil lamp! They lose a ton of value.

John Stevenson
04-18-2009, 07:58 AM
Wow, new Coleman lamps are a lot more expensive than I thought. I paid $16 for mine. I had no idea there were lamp collectors but I will see what I can find out about them on that lampguild site. Thanks all, for the replies.

Mike

You think Coleman lamps are expensive do a search for Angel lamps.

http://www.tsauction.co.uk/results_carriages_report_carr-dispersal_19-07-08.pdf

What the sales blurb doesn't say is they these are handed and you need a RH and LH for a set.

Malc, the scrappie collects old lamps and he has one complete set and two right handers and is always looking for the left hand ones.

Lamp collecting in the UK is a serious business with fakes, and lamps made up of different models but a discerning collector will spot these straight off.

It's for a good reason that prices are not mentioned on this web site. The showmans lamps, even unrestored are well into 4 figures.

http://www.prestonservices.co.uk/lamps.htm

Anyone taking the pi$$ out of Joseph Lucas, Prince of Darkness who has a good collection of these lamps is laughing harder than you :D

Evan
04-18-2009, 08:25 AM
NEVER USE A COLEMAN MANTLE LANTERN INSIDE.

The fuel is highly volatile and capable of forming an explosive vapor at room temperature. The flash point of petroleum naptha is around -40 degrees. The vapours are heavier than air and will collect in low lying areas instead of dispersing.

If you need liquid fuel powered indoor lighting then use a kerosene (paraffin) lamp. We have two Aladdin Lamps that use kerosene (lamp oil). These are mantle lamps that put out about the same light as a 60 watt bulb. The fuel has a flash point well above room temperature and does not form an explosive vapour at or near room temperature.

KyMike
04-18-2009, 02:18 PM
>>>> If you need liquid fuel powered indoor lighting then use a kerosene (paraffin) lamp. We have two Aladdin Lamps that use kerosene (lamp oil). These are mantle lamps that put out about the same light as a 60 watt bulb. The fuel has a flash point well above room temperature and does not form an explosive vapour at or near room temperature.<<<<

_________________



I had heard of Aladdin lamps but have never seen one and didn't know they were still being made, but I will check into this. I do have a couple of old-fashioned kerosene oil lamps with the wicks and the glass chimneys, but even when turned up to the point where they start to smoke they are fairly dim. Too bad that Coleman couldn't have designed their equipment to use kerosene.

Mike

Evan
04-18-2009, 03:19 PM
Apparently they are still going strong.

http://www.aladdinlamps.com/store/dynamicIndex.asp

saltmine
04-18-2009, 03:34 PM
Out of curiosity, I checked with Coleman...and "officially" they don't recommend the use of unleaded gasoline in their lamps. They claim it shortens the life of the generator and will eventually damage or render the lamp unserviceable. They do manufacture both propane and kerosene fueled lamps, though.

Yankee1
04-18-2009, 04:42 PM
Hi Everyone
Just a tip. We found out that when transporting these lanterns over bumpy roads on hunting trips that the mantles ended up broken. In order to prevent this we spray them with hair spray and no more broken mantles.
Yankee1

agrip
04-18-2009, 06:20 PM
Yank
I like the suggestion on the mantle "fixatiff"
Had not thought of that.
Should burn off a heap faster than the original bag, probably unnoticeable unless you know it's there.

Ag