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View Full Version : different mindset fom industrial environment to home shop environment



oil mac
04-23-2009, 07:11 PM
Slightly off topic i know, and i do not know if anyone has discussed along these lines before, Generally in an industrial situation, life can be a constant hassle,frequent worry, sometimes quite boring, and in todays world, great uncertainty, Leaving such an environment behind, Ones home workshop, If one is in sync with his soul, it should be a haven of tranquility, O.K. sometimes something may go completely wrong or beyond saving, and we find, that current situation is evocative of strong language, What do you all want perfection in life?
Today was one of those days, where i decided to open the door to my "heavy workshop" As a matter of interest, i had not ventured in to it, for many months, having for various reasons concentrated my efforts in my small shop, with its light machine tools, The two reasons for such a course of action were, all my hobby projects were of an extremely light engineering bias, and the other was for some time lack of physical energy, Warmer weather seems to have bestirred my bones.
The task in hand today was shaping down a couple of brass components, in this task i had to remove a fair amount of metal, from two faces, and "tickle up" other faces to be square &true to the area i was operating on I spent an afternoon using my 10"stroke Royal shaper, Dont know how you all feel about shapers, but i always feel that the shaping machine is a most soothing & pleasant machine tool to operate, And with the proper tool in the machine, Ones finish can be glass like and accurate with no great effort, needless to say i left the shop at my mealbreak, with a feelgood factor, It was like spending the afternoon with a good &faithfull companion.
Would like to give everybody a question to answer Leaving the lathe to the oneside (as it is the trusty warhorse of 99.9% of home shoppers) After the lathe what is your favourite machine to operate, or is your first love fitting? List your preferences guys and your reasons, Is it just a comfortable machine tool, feeling of achievement, harking back to days past memories of yourold work environment etc?
If you are a woodwork enthusiast/jeweller, clockmaker etc dont feel left
out, give us your input.

Liger Zero
04-23-2009, 08:35 PM
Sheetmetal, specifically press-brake. I'd be happier that >insert inane metaphor< here with a small laser and a proper brake at home.

Not yet though.

My second love is the turret lathe... I run one for a living and I wish I had one at home. My wee lathes are fun to drive but I wish I had a proper turret lathe at home. With the way the market is now I may end up with one sooner than my press and laser. :)

Mill... Well I *can* operate a mill... after all it's nothing more than a lathe that someone stood on end. But my preferred toys are the benders and the lathes.

At home I can whip out parts faster and with less hassle than I can at work, because I only have to feed my own ego, not the egos of half a dozen other people. I can also grind tools MY WAY and set things up as I see them in my mind not according to seniority and ego. I can turn parts on feel rather than some bastardized "maximum" speed and feed figured by some arcane method that results in a ****ty finish but hundreds of parts per hour.

Nothing like having a row of shiny aluminum knobs in a row on my work bench that do not need any secondary operations... secondary operations added so we can keep another operator on payroll and off the street.

I look at my home shop as my proving ground. I *can* do anything in my home shop because I know I can. I don't have to play The Game or feed egos here. It's just me and the machines and the material.

lane
04-23-2009, 08:35 PM
I`ll go first I guess. Well some one beat me to it. My favorite machine even more than the lathe is the vertical mill . Then the lathe . Then may be the surface grinder . After that it does not matter. For me Shapers are nice but too slow. I had one once and could do things so much faster in the mill.

John Stevenson
04-23-2009, 09:01 PM
Mine has to be the power saw.
They hardly get a mention but they do sterling work of a type that would be hard on other machines unless you have a lathe with a 6" spindle bore and parting tool to match.

They take the tedium out of what would be a mind numbing job and do it in a fraction of the time. In a hobby were time is precious how much does this save you ? at the worst it could even be more than the time allotted if you had to do it by hand.

Last week I cleaned the chip trays out on two lathes using an old 5 gallon drum with wire handle on. The lathes took a couple of drums each but they do get emptied regularly and it's all light stuff.

The power saw hasn't been done for 5 or 6 weeks, this took 3/4 of a drum and I'm glad it wasn't any more as it was getting hard to lift.

That's when it occurs to you just how much one of these machines works without complaint.

.

Seastar
04-23-2009, 09:01 PM
1. Wire feed welder
2. Plasma cutter
3. O/A welder
4. mill
5. lathe
6. shaper
7. 50 cal Browning Machine Gun
Bill

ckelloug
04-23-2009, 09:45 PM
Seastar,

I've heard setting the quill depth when machining with a .50bmg is a bit tricky to get right. I also tend to think armor piercing inserts might be necessary.

--Cameron

Bguns
04-24-2009, 02:11 AM
50 BMG is somewhat lighter than your average 1/2 dia by 1/2 depth 550 Holes per min Punch Press :)

dp
04-24-2009, 03:07 AM
I actually make reasons to use my shaper. I love to mess with it. After that it is my lathe, mill, one of my radial arm saws, and then my table saw. When I get my wood lathe going with a new variable speed DC motor that will climb the charts quickly. I thought I'd get more time with my mig welder but I just don't have welding projects backing up.

My ultimate goal is to get running a version of the Rose Lathe that Mark Hocket showed us here some time back. That just looks like a complete hoot to have going.

rmack898
04-24-2009, 07:10 AM
From the point of personal satisfaction, I'd say it's the brake and TIG welder. I find great pleasure in taking a flat sheet of aluminum and drawing some lines on it, cutting it here, and cutting it there, drill a hole or two. Take this funny looking flat piece of metal to the brake and in a fraction of the time it took you to draw, cut, and drill, you transform it into a functional, 3-dimentional object. Tig weld the seams, sit back and realize that you've taken an idea and made it real tangable object. Top it off with the beverage of your choice and life is good.

Liger Zero
04-24-2009, 08:10 AM
From the point of personal satisfaction, I'd say it's the brake and TIG welder. I find great pleasure in taking a flat sheet of aluminum and drawing some lines on it, cutting it here, and cutting it there, drill a hole or two. Take this funny looking flat piece of metal to the brake and in a fraction of the time it took you to draw, cut, and drill, you transform it into a functional, 3-dimentional object. Tig weld the seams, sit back and realize that you've taken an idea and made it real tangable object. Top it off with the beverage of your choice and life is good.


Can I hear an AMEN? :D

moldmonkey
04-24-2009, 12:06 PM
My K&T is 70 this year but is a joy to run. Power feed & rapids in all directions. Not exactly nimble like a bridgie but plenty of power & rigid.

Manual surface grinding can be relaxing when you get in a rhythm.

Edna:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v476/moldmonkey/P1010054.jpg

My home shop is relaxing in that I don't have the constant interruptions and desgin changes. I work in a light industrial plant where most people have very little industrial experience. Frustrating when even the maintance guys can't do what seems so basic to me.
It makes me fearful for America's industrial future.

Ries
04-24-2009, 12:45 PM
I love all my children, even though they are different.

I have to say, one of the most grin inducing tools is always the vertical milling machine.
I dont think I will ever get over being impressed watching it throw off chips, especially with a power feed and stops, so its doing it by itself.

But another sheer joy to run is the self contained power hammer.
Mine is a measly 88lb machine, a chinese copy of a Chambersburg, but it still is more fun than should be legal to take a piece of red hot 1 1/2" round, and SQUASH THAT SUCKER.

I also have a long standing love affair with my hossfeld bender. Applying very little force, by using leverage, you can accurately bend big heavy stuff, or straighten 2" pipe, or make perfect circles.

Another toy I cant get enough of is my power twisting machine. Its basically a 1 axis CNC, programmable to 1 degree of rotation, with massive torque, an electric brake, and the ability to twist 1" square like it was butter.
Fun to watch.

Walter
04-24-2009, 05:35 PM
Hrm, I think I'd list the pneumatic drop hammer/ forging hammer as the most fun. Heat up block of D2, remove from furnace, quick face cleanup with a wire brush then slip onto anvil. Second guy places swedge on the block of D2 then it's click *WHAM*. First guy pulls the block and taps out the swedge into a pan of water. Generally we get 3 hits then it's back into the furnace with the block. The forming blocks we make are used to form bolsters and caps for knives, all done in nickel silver.

All in all I like every machine and all the processes, but I'm most adept on the lathe. I am however seriously looking forward to pulling the shaper from storage and getting it up and going in the shop.