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View Full Version : Yipee! I Get to Work in a Foundry!



Tuckerfan
08-16-2003, 12:30 AM
After years of trying to get a job in machining (but not being able to because I didn't have any experience), I've finally managed to score a job in a foundry that could lead to me working in a machine shop.

I got it thanks to a buddy of mine who's working in their machine shop. They had four people walk out of the foundry in one week and are backlogged on orders. He called me, and I went down, had a five minute interview, and found out today that I get to start on Monday. It means a cut in pay (I'm going to have to get a second job to help make ends meet.), but at least I've gotten my foot in the door.

Anything I should know, other than it'll be really hot?

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Evan
08-16-2003, 01:34 AM
Keep your pant legs outside the boots.

wierdscience
08-16-2003, 01:42 AM
Don't wear boots with laces.

winchman
08-16-2003, 01:43 AM
There are several things in a foundry that can cause health problems. Metal fumes, dust, noise, and the hot stuff come to mind right off. If the company is really a good place to work, they will have some strict safety rules, and training to make it clear why they're important.

If the company provides safety equipment for you, make sure it's the best and most comfortable available. If it's not, inquire about buying better stuff at your own expense.

I'd also be curious why several guys quit all at once. Maybe that's a sign of something going on that you don't want to get into.

I have to admire someone who will give up a better paying job for one with an opportunity to lead to what he really wants to do. That takes guts in today's world.

Good luck, and I hope the move really pays off for you.

Roger

winchman
08-16-2003, 01:45 AM
There are several things in a foundry that can cause health problems. Metal fumes, dust, noise, and the hot stuff come to mind right off. If the company is really a good place to work, they will have some strict safety rules, and training to make it clear why they're important.

If the company provides safety equipment for you, make sure it's the best and most comfortable available. If it's not, inquire about buying better stuff at your own expense.

I'd also be curious why several guys quit all at once. Maybe that's a sign of something going on that you don't want to get into.

I have to admire someone who will give up a better paying job for one with an opportunity to lead to what he really wants to do. That takes guts in today's world.

Good luck, and I hope the move really pays off for you.

Roger

Tuckerfan
08-16-2003, 01:59 AM
winchman, apparently it's a pattern they have there. Folks work for the place for years, and then suddenly walk out in the middle of their shift. I trust my friend on this, besides, it's the only chance I've had in the years that I've been trying to get a job as a machinist, so I can't afford to turn it down.

ibewgypsie
08-16-2003, 02:10 AM
Tucker, one a-hole drops sparks on the floor, you get one more burn, you quit. That final straw.

Thrud
08-16-2003, 03:37 AM
Tuckerfan:
Best of luck with the new job - be safe!

Al Messer
08-16-2003, 09:36 AM
Goodlettsville?

Tuckerfan
08-16-2003, 10:37 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Al Messer:
Goodlettsville?</font>
Gallatin. Precision Casting of Tennessee.


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Al Messer
08-16-2003, 03:39 PM
Very good!! Keep your eyes open and learn all you can and by all means, be SAFE!!

bspooh
08-16-2003, 03:45 PM
It appears to me that you would be a dedicated and loyal employee...People like you are hard to find....If you ever would like to move to Salt Lake City, I would hire you...I just laid off and idiot who only put in 50% all of the time..you sound like you would be very dedicated and give 100%....Move here and you will have a job...good work ethically people are hard to find...good luck with your future in metal..

brent

Tuckerfan
08-16-2003, 04:38 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by bspooh:
It appears to me that you would be a dedicated and loyal employee...People like you are hard to find....If you ever would like to move to Salt Lake City, I would hire you...I just laid off and idiot who only put in 50% all of the time..you sound like you would be very dedicated and give 100%....Move here and you will have a job...good work ethically people are hard to find...good luck with your future in metal..

brent</font>

Thanks, bspooh, and as much as I would like to move out West (really would, too, never been there but seen lots of pretty pictures) my finances wouldn't support such an endeavor at this time. However, if I get lucky and win the lottery (of course, I'll have to start playing it first) or my finances improve I'll keep your offer in mind.

I do know what you mean about having trouble finding people who want to work. I got in trouble at one of my old jobs for working too hard! Nevermind that what I was being paid to do was extremely easy or that I was being paid a good salary for doing what I was doing, people complained that I was working too hard and that I needed to slow down. Drove me nuts!

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bspooh
08-16-2003, 05:24 PM
Its tough being on both sides of the fence sometimes...When I first started working at a machine shop, I also was told that I am working too hard and it makes everyone else look bad...What a crock of sh*t...I was teased about brown nosing...I hate that..I worked my butt off to get where i am now, screw all of the other lazy people...Survival of the fittest is what I believe in, and I survived and all of the other people didn't...You have to worry about yourself in life...I never cared about making friends at jobs...I only wanted to do the best that I could do, so I could earn my way up the corporate ladder...I am now finally where I want to be,..at the top...I laugh at all my past fellow co-workers...

Be true, work hard, take pride in what you do, and give 110% even if you are not getting paid...its called dedication...You gotta respect that...

brent

Alistair Hosie
08-16-2003, 05:33 PM
Well done many years of happiness to you Tucker. I hope you thoroughly enjoy the job and it leads to your dreams being fulfilled with a machining position later take care buddy. Alistair

shaque
08-16-2003, 10:32 PM
Tucker;
This old world needs more people like you, keep up the good work and don't worry about what the other guy thinks...Wish I had my time back so I could have done the job I wanted to do instead of worrying about what my peers thought. I'm not complaining, I have had a good life and earned a good living, not rich, just a good living.
Take care buddy...
Regards
Jim

[This message has been edited by shaque (edited 08-16-2003).]

Thrud
08-16-2003, 10:51 PM
Brent
You have reenforced my unfaltering respect for you. You are my kind of hoser, eh! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

[This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 08-16-2003).]

chief
08-17-2003, 12:21 AM
Tucker,
BZ,on your new job, do your best I ran into the same thing as bspooh did, just keep charging but make it known loud and clear that your goal is a machining job,
My brother ended up with carpol tunnel syndrome from grinding castings for years
they kept promising a step up but in the end it was one excuse after another. The
same foundry advertised no lay offs in twenty-five years but forgot to mention this was accomplished by reducing hours to
24 hours a week. good luck
same foundry

Dave Opincarne
08-17-2003, 09:49 PM
Tucker, grow eyes in the back of your head! Especialy when a melt or pour is in progress. Will you be working in the foundry itself or in the cleaning room? Aside from the enviromental hazards the cleaning room is RELATIVLEY safe. If you're around a pour make absolutly certain of whats going to happen and what your job is. Pours are expensive and dangerous. I've heard stories that have kept me up at night. As a patternmaker I don't mind being around them, but you couldn't pay me enough to work in a foundry. As a stepping stone it wouldn't be bad, but make sure you move up and out. Pattern work may be an option if your interested (and there's anyone left to do it http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//frown.gif) If you need help figuring out the molding, gating, paterns or cores drop me a line and I'll do my best to help (although be warned that every foundry does things a little differently) If I've got time I'll check back here, but e-mail is best for me now.

Good luck and grow those extra eyes

-Dave

One more thing: I don't want to step on any toes but from my own observation other than the foreman, lead, and a few top guys the people that work in the foundry for any leangth of time without moving up in the operation are not the sharpest knives in the drawer. Keep that in mind when they're breaking you in and when your safety depends on them.

[This message has been edited by Dave Opincarne (edited 08-17-2003).]

cblair
08-17-2003, 10:37 PM
I worked in a iron foundry in NC for 2 years and the only reason people quit was to get hired back for more money a month later. Thats what happens in a small town with few opportunities. If you let them know right away that you are interested in working in the pattern shop it might help you out later on. In my experiance however you have to inherite those jobs. I don't know what they are starting you with but most of our new people started out as sand shovelers. If so don't get discouraged, I never saw that job last more than a couple of months. Bring extra cloths and shower and change before you get in your car or else you will reqret it. You should wash your work clothes at the laundry mat not at home, your wife will thank you for it. Good luck and I hope you find something there enjoyable, I liked the people and the job but hated the enviroment.

Charles

Tuckerfan
08-17-2003, 11:33 PM
Thanks for the advice, guys. My buddy seems to like the place, and he says that the boss there is the best he's ever had. The owner's an animal lover and has cats, dogs, and even a bird (it can't fly because of a bad wing, lives in his desk drawer) in the offices, so that seems to be a good sign to me.

Even as hot and nasty as the job is, at least it comes with benefits, which none of the temp jobs I've had in the past year have had. And it least it offers me a metal working job to put on a resume, which none of the jobs I've been able to get up until now have had.

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Shed Machinist
08-31-2003, 12:13 AM
How is the job going? Hust thought i would ask.

Tuckerfan
08-31-2003, 03:18 PM
Not too bad, actually. The heat isn't quite as bad as I thought it would be, and they seem to be pretty impressed with my work.

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