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Timleech
05-03-2009, 07:41 AM
My wife spends a fair bit of time digging up family history, one nugget she has come up with is that one of my relatives, a Frank C Hedley, was employed as a salesman by the Columbia Machine Works at the time he signed up for the first World War. He was living in Manhattan at the time.
Just idle curiosity, of no consequence to the future of the universe or even to the spread of swine flu, does anyone know what the Works did, was it general engineering or did they make machines?
A google search finds another works of the same name but in Tennessee and established in 1927.
He also signed up for WWII, at that time he was employed by the J G White Engineering Corporation

Thanks
Tim

Edited to correct company name

oil mac
05-03-2009, 07:48 AM
Tim, A couple of years ago, i came across a Columbia lathe, made in the U.S.A. It was a nice little lathe from the 1900/s era, Sadly i was not able to do anything to save it & it was cut up over here, (A long way from home!) Wonder if this was the same company?

barts
05-03-2009, 02:44 PM
My wife spends a fair bit of time digging up family history, one nugget she has come up with is that one of my relatives, a Frank C Hedley, was employed as a salesman by the Columbia Machine Works at the time he signed up for the first World War. He was living in Manhattan at the time.
Just idle curiosity, of no consequence to the future of the universe or even to the spread of swine flu, does anyone know what the Works did, was it general engineering or did they make machines?
A google search finds another works of the same name but in Tennessee and established in 1927.
He also signed up for WWII, at that time he was employed by the J G White Engineering Corporation

Thanks
Tim

Edited to correct company name



Google show the following text from


http://www.archive.org/stream/electricrailwayj4546mcgrrich/electricrailwayj4546mcgrrich_djvu.txt


which may help your search further:



Columbia Electric Hoist in service lifting 40 foot 20 ton car.

Columbia Electric Hoists

in the
Holyoke (Mass.) St. Ry. Co. Shops



In the repair shop bay of its new carhouse, the Holyoke Street
Railway Company has provided two Columbia Electric Car
Hoists for lifting car bodies from the trucks. Columbia Hoists
were chosen because of their superior design, their ease of



operation, their extra factor of strength and their contribution

to repair work economy.

We can serve you just as efficiently.

Write us regarding your needs.





f-floor Li ne



Columbia Electric Car Hoist



Columbia Repair Shop Specialties and Car Equipment Include



Axle and Armature Straighteners.

Bearings for Armatures and Axles.

Armature Stands, Armature Buggies.

Car Hoists. Car Replaeers.

Brake Appliances. Handles. Forgings for Brake

Kiting, etc.
Babbitting Moulds, Lathe Chucks.



Banding and Heading Machines.

Coil Winding Machines for field and armature coils.

Coils for Armatures and Fields.

Coil Taping Machines for Armature Leads.

Bolls for Flattening Leads of Armature Coils.

Cnr Trimmings. Car Signs Day and Night.

Ci mmutators, Controller-Handles, Door Looks.



Gear Cases All Steel and M. I., Pit Jacks.

Grid Resistances, Signal or Target Switches.

Pinion Pullers, Trolley Poles Steel.

Trolley Wheels. Tension Stands.

Fuses, N. W. Cartridge.

Car Wheel Hoists and Special Track Work.



Columbia Machine Works & Malleable Iron Co.

Atlantic Ave. and Chestnut St., Brooklyn, N. Y.



June 5, 1915]



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL

Timleech
05-03-2009, 03:12 PM
Google show the following text from


http://www.archive.org/stream/electricrailwayj4546mcgrrich/electricrailwayj4546mcgrrich_djvu.txt


which may help your search further:


<snip>

June 5, 1915]

ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL

Many thanks for that, interesting stuff.

The railway connection makes sense, he came from a Railway family, his father was another Frank Hedley who was General Manager of the Interborough Rapid Transit system and he (Frank Sr)and his father had worked on railways in the UK before emigrating. They claimed a family connection with William Hedley of Wylam who developed the first commercially successful steam locomotive running on smooth rails ('Puffing Billy'), but we've been unable to establish the precise connection.
It looks as though the connection, if it was real, might have been that William Hedley's father was a bit of an 'old goat' :D :D


Tim

John Stevenson
05-03-2009, 03:19 PM
Some details here.
http://query.nytimes.com/search/sitesearch?query=columbia+machine+works&n=10&prev=0&frow=0&page=1

Looks like a packaging company.

Barrington
05-03-2009, 04:32 PM
Advert in Brooklyn NY Daily Eagle 1922

http://i564.photobucket.com/albums/ss82/MrBarrington/BrooklynNYDailyEagle1922aGrayscale-.jpg

Whole page (http://fultonhistory.com/Newspaper%205/Brooklyn%20NY%20Daily%20Eagle/Brooklyn%20NY%20Daily%20Eagle%201922%20Grayscale/Brooklyn%20NY%20Daily%20Eagle%201922%20a%20Graysca le%20-%200076.pdf)

Scishopguy
05-04-2009, 10:57 AM
Tim...The shop I worked in at the university had an old (large) Columbia power shear that was of WWII vintage. It was a beast of a machine that weighed 12 tons (I moved it into the building myself). It had a bronze tag that had the name Columbia Machine Works on the head.

As for the wife's hobby, mine is into the same thing and it amazes me the neat info that she comes up with. ;)

Timleech
05-04-2009, 03:55 PM
Tim...The shop I worked in at the university had an old (large) Columbia power shear that was of WWII vintage. It was a beast of a machine that weighed 12 tons (I moved it into the building myself). It had a bronze tag that had the name Columbia Machine Works on the head.

As for the wife's hobby, mine is into the same thing and it amazes me the neat info that she comes up with. ;)

Thanks to all for the enlightening info.

On reflection, a friend of mine had an old American bench lathe of a brand I'd never heard before, could easily have been Columbia. He died some years ago, his widow still had the lathe about 5 years ago & might have it yet.

My wife thought she had made a breakthrough in her research of the UK Hedleys today, looks as though it was a false alarm with someone else putting one of my relatives in their family tree by mistake. That sort of error seems to happen quite often.


Cheers
Tim