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mochinist
05-04-2009, 02:00 PM
I bought this anvil a couple weeks ago and I want to make a stand for it. I have looked at google and see a few ideas I like, but I'm not really sure what height the top surface should be at? Or should I just make the legs adjustable?

Its a 200lb trenton and is a little beat up, but not real bad. I got it for a dollar a pound.

Also since it is a little beat up, is it sacrilegious to clean up the dings and light rust and paint it? I realize its mine now and I can do as I please, I'm just curious:p

There is a place in Camp Verde, AZ that does blacksmithing classes during the fall and spring, hopefully I can make it to some of them one of these days


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/mochinist/th_IMG00062.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v471/mochinist/?action=view&current=IMG00062.jpg)

Ries
05-04-2009, 02:38 PM
Anvil height is a personal preference thing, and it depends on the kind of work you do.
I know guys who do a lot of almost jewelry like work, hand stamping, careful manipulation of small stuff, who mount their anvils almost chest high, and others who mostly swing 4 pound hammers on huge workpieces, who like em real low.

the old standard was, let your arm hang loose, and your knuckles should graze the top.

Me, I find that a bit low, but its close.

There are several anvil stands over on www.anvilfire.com

here-
http://www.anvilfire.com/iForge/tutor/jd_stand/

Of course, logs are traditional.

I have an "urban stump" on mine- made from scrounged 2x4's
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/rniemi/anvil.jpg

the Arizona blacksmiths meet regularly-
http://az-blacksmiths.org/

JABautsch
05-04-2009, 02:53 PM
If I were setting it up I would put the top of the anvil at belt level or slightly below. You want your arms in a relaxed position as much as possible. The idea is to let the hammer do as much of the work as possible without a lot of stress on your arms. You want the head of the hammer and your forearms parallel with the top of the work as the hammer strikes it on the anvil. Striking the work at any other angle will make a mess of the work and/or place a lot of unnecessary stress on the arms and shoulders trying to get a flat hit. If this is going to be a working anvil and the top face of the anvil is not dinged up to bad you can have a shop re-grind it to flat. This would not be an unusual procedure for an anvil. You can find some old anvils that have the top face plate replaced or even have another one welded over the old one.

PTSideshow
05-04-2009, 03:06 PM
Ries is right about the height around were your knuckles are. It depends on what you are going to do with it some face the top with welding rod but which kind is almost as much debatable as repairing it and grind it down. As to the stand some use the stump, make sure in is bug free! other use a welded stand and rubber pads. Other make a box like structure and fill it with sand.
Others put wheels/casters on one end and a jack point on the other, so you can dolly it around easier if you will be moving it.
:D

Your Old Dog
05-04-2009, 03:16 PM
You want the hammer face and your forarmto be parallel with the anvil when the stroke ends. So, hold a steel rod in your left hand and and bend ever so slightly like you would tend to do and then drop your average hammer to the rod. The hammer face and your forearm should be parallel with the floor/anvil. Now measure the height from the floor to the top of your rod/workpiece and thats the height you want. You can wail along all day and not be quite as tired as guys who have to adjust their body to the anvil.

Tree stump sections work great for me as they can be easily moved around the shop when it's in the way. I think the stumps help eat up some of the sound as well.

ptjw7uk
05-04-2009, 03:17 PM
Knuckle height is about right that is if you are going to do any blacksmithing as when striking the metal they would like the hammer head to be horizontal so I suppose the height would vary as to the stature of the blacksmith.
So all in all it would depend wht its main use would be, large lumps of wood were used to deaden some of the ringing made worse when mounted on steel dolly, dollies would be used with a swaging block so as to allow metal or dollies through the holes.

Peter

thistle
05-04-2009, 03:21 PM
I have one mounted on a section of log , (a very hard wood it is )
if you could find a section of white oak or such you would be doing ok

that is the traditional way of mounting an anvil.

no complaints about the set up, being on a round base it makes the anvil easy to move .

mochinist
05-04-2009, 03:58 PM
I'll have my friends keep their eyes out for a big mesquite stump, since were kinda lacking in oak around these parts, until then I got some basics to work with and a height to build around .

I'll also be tossing it up on my big mattison grinder and cleaning the face up

Thank You

thistle
05-04-2009, 04:21 PM
well post a picture then ......

Patch
05-04-2009, 04:25 PM
I'll also be tossing it up on my big mattison grinder and cleaning the face up

Thank You

Not sure that is wise. Anvils are not one slug of hardened steel. They do have a tough outer hardcase but under that they are of much softer steel.

Why remove the character of the anvil anyways?

Also, Good o'l Gordon. You can catch him about every saturday in Jerome.
He operates the old blacksmithy shop out at the "Old Gold King Mine".
It's located about a mile and a half west of the town.
Go for the tour, on your own lead, and just sit and watch him work for a few hours.
I get a chance to see him several times a year. A nice guy to meet and know.

Patch

barts
05-04-2009, 04:29 PM
I have mine on a camphor tree stump - smells nice, and seems to not rot too fast as my anvil spends time in the rain; no space in the shop. It isn't any rustier now than when I bought it ;) . Wood definitely is quieter than a steel stand.

The knuckle test for height is about perfect, maybe a tiny bit higher.

- Bart

mochinist
05-04-2009, 04:32 PM
well post a picture then ...... I did in the first post, is it not showing up for you guys? I can see it:confused:


Not sure that is wise. Anvils are not one slug of hardened steel. They do have a tough outer hardcase but under that they are of much softer steel.

Why remove the character of the anvil anyways?

Also, Good o'l Gordon. You can catch him about every saturday in Jerome.
He operates the old blacksmithy shop out at the "Old Gold King Mine".
It's located about a mile and a half west of the town.
Go for the tour, on your own lead, and just sit and watch him work for a few hours.
I get a chance to see him several times a year. A nice guy to meet and know.

PatchIt has a plate on the top surface that has been forge welded on(I think that is the correct term). Its my understanding that the top plate is a lot harder than the rest of the anvil?

I'll look into checking out gordons tour. Jerome is such a cool little town, and a fun drive if any of you local AZers have never been up there.

Patch
05-04-2009, 04:37 PM
Get a chance be sure to say hi to Don. He's the owner of the mine and ghost town.

He is really into some of the early motorcycles.

He'll talk your ear off, never repeats himself as everything he says is always something new. He's a pretty cool dude.

aostling
05-04-2009, 04:45 PM
I found the perfect anvil stand over a year ago, and posted a photo of it here: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=25433&highlight=mesquite. It's yours, if you want to drive over to my house in Phoenix. It will take two strong men to lift it into the back of your truck. Or you and I can roll it up a plank.

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/mesquiteunbarked-1.jpg

johnl
05-04-2009, 05:03 PM
As far as your blacksmith school, John C Campbell Folkschool in Brasstown NC
Teaches blacksmithing year around. https://www.folkschool.org/
John L

Lew Hartswick
05-04-2009, 05:20 PM
Also, Good o'l Gordon. You can catch him about every saturday in Jerome.
He operates the old blacksmithy shop out at the "Old Gold King Mine".
It's located about a mile and a half west of the town.
Go for the tour, on your own lead, and just sit and watch him work for a few hours.
I get a chance to see him several times a year. A nice guy to meet and know.

Patch
Hey that is some "operation". I was just there in March for the first
time. (Been it the area many times but never out to the Old Gold
Mine). A friend of our has been doing some work for the "main man"
( I forget his name ) and we got a real tour.
I highly recomend it for anyone passing through Jerome. :-)
...lew...edit: Get a chance be sure to say hi to Don. He's the owner of the mine and ghost town.
Yea Patch, that's him. :-)

mochinist
05-04-2009, 05:21 PM
I found the perfect anvil stand over a year ago, and posted a photo of it here: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=25433&highlight=mesquite. It's yours, if you want to drive over to my house in Phoenix. It will take two strong men to lift it into the back of your truck. Or you and I can roll it up a plank.

PM sent

thank you

Patch
05-04-2009, 06:49 PM
I found the perfect anvil stand over a year ago, and posted a photo of it here: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=25433&highlight=mesquite. It's yours, if you want to drive over to my house in Phoenix. It will take two strong men to lift it into the back of your truck. Or you and I can roll it up a plank.

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/mesquiteunbarked-1.jpg


That's a fine looking piece of tree there aostling. Just about the right height and diameter.


Several years ago, on one of my lumber buying trips, I was in west Texas where I found a mill selling aligator juniper. Picked up several pieces about the size you are showing. Beautiful wood and very dense.
After I stripped the bark off with a draw knife I put on two coats of spar varnish. Following this, I made two barrel rings from 1/4x2" steel and put them about 4" off top and bottom. Cross tied the anvil with 1/4x1" to the top ring. It turned out great and is a pretty good conversation piece let alone all the use it gives me. My anvil is the 350 lber.

How does a person get thru life without and anvil? Everyone should have one. Which brings me to my next comment.

As of late, town of Cottonwood, there is a little stagestop antique shop on main street, just before you make the right curve out of the town leading to Chino Valley, that currently has three 250/300 lber's. They are asking $450 a piece. This little shop is about 400/500 feet, across the street, from the army/navy surplus store there.

If you make it into the town of Campverde, there is a very large antique shop on the main street about 1/4 mile south of the Circle K store that has two, 150 lber's. Those are $200 a piece.

Fasttrack
05-04-2009, 07:05 PM
I did in the first post, is it not showing up for you guys? I can see it:confused:

It has a plate on the top surface that has been forge welded on(I think that is the correct term). Its my understanding that the top plate is a lot harder than the rest of the anvil?

I'll look into checking out gordons tour. Jerome is such a cool little town, and a fun drive if any of you local AZers have never been up there.

Yes - traditionally the top plate is harder and forge welded on to the body. Grinding should be ok. I like wood stands because they don't bounce and ring ...

Patch - You want a smooth surface to smith on. If it has dings and nicks, then those will show up on your work piece.

Patch
05-04-2009, 07:14 PM
Patch - You want a smooth surface to smith on. If it has dings and nicks, then those will show up on your work piece.

I find you amusing. :D

aostling
05-04-2009, 07:33 PM
That's a fine looking piece of tree there aostling. Just about the right height and diameter.


Perfect, indeed, and perhaps even heavier than a similar sized hunk of alligator juniper. I read that larvae are in the bark, so soon after I took that photo I stripped the bark with a draw knife.

Thanks for the tip about the antique shop in Cottonwood. I'm no blacksmith but it will be fun to go up there and poke around.

Patch
05-04-2009, 07:45 PM
aostling,

It is a pretty neat place and not hard to find. It looks like a small place but when you get inside, it's hugh. They also have a fenced in acre with the place just full of olden tools and the like.
Just ask anyone about and they will say, oh yeah, I know the place and give you directions if you can't find it.

After stripping your wood piece of the bark to show its beauty it's gonna be hard to part with. If mochinist picks it up I'm sure he will like it. :)

aostling
05-04-2009, 08:21 PM
If mochinist picks it up I'm sure he will like it. :)

Mochinist will pick up the mesquite stump later this week. I thought about making it into a conversation piece, but balked at the thought of getting it up the stairs to my upstairs condo.

thistle
05-04-2009, 08:38 PM
soory , lets see the anvil on the grinder!



I did in the first post, is it not showing up for you guys? I can see it:confused:

It has a plate on the top surface that has been forge welded on(I think that is the correct term). Its my understanding that the top plate is a lot harder than the rest of the anvil?

I'll look into checking out gordons tour. Jerome is such a cool little town, and a fun drive if any of you local AZers have never been up there.

Doc Nickel
05-04-2009, 09:08 PM
soory , lets see the anvil on the grinder!

-How about in the vertical mill (http://www.docsmachine.com/fabshop/anvilmill.jpg)? :D

As far as an anvil stand goes, I wasn't big on the traditional stump. First, most wood and stumpage up here is pretty soft- birch, pine or cottonwood is about it. Second, I wanted the assembly somewhat portable, so I could move it with a hand cart at the very least. So this is what I came up with:

http://www.docsmachine.com/fabshop/anvilstand.jpg

The fitted plywood inside the base acts as a bit of a ring damper just as a stump does. The bars inside the feet and the outer pins obviously hold a decent selection of hammers and tongs. One thing not shown is that I welded four bits of 1" wide section of 3x3"x1/4" angle iron inside of each leg, between the leg and tray crossmember.

That gave me two 'tabs' on either side so I could use a handcart/dolly to pick it all up and move it.

And each time I fire up the forge (sadly not often enough) I bash up some various little curlicues or pothooks or other little random bits. One of these days when I have a fair handful, I'll weld them on the stand as embellishment. :D

Doc.