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ahidley
05-19-2009, 08:03 AM
What are the slots in a drill press base for? They also have mounting holes around the edge to fasten it to the floor. But the base is machined flat and some have t-slots in the base. I cant imagine mounting work on the base because the head oin a drill press doesnt move vertically, only the spindle moves down but only a few inches..

garagemark
05-19-2009, 08:06 AM
Good question. My old Delta drill press has two long parallel slots in the base- and four round mounting holes in the corners.

Hmmm...

Mark

Seastar
05-19-2009, 08:07 AM
That's a very good question that I have often wondered about.
Bill

jimmstruk
05-19-2009, 08:17 AM
I have several times needed to drill some object way too tall to clamp to the drill table. In those instances, swing the regular table clear out of the way, clamp the work piece to the base slots and drill away. Also one could mount a large angle plate to the drill base, opening many more options. JIM

gnm109
05-19-2009, 08:25 AM
What Jimmstruk said. I have a 1955 Craftsman 1/2" drill press with the typical slotted base. I got tired of chips falling down through them and filling up under the base. I took a piece of 1/8" stainless plate and welded four pins in it. I just set that down on top of the base and the pins line up with the holes and keep it from moving.

Dawai
05-19-2009, 09:17 AM
Well.. saw a photo once of Henry Ford spinning crankshafts on a drill press polishing them.

Anybody got one of them tooling setups on theirs??

Lew Hartswick
05-19-2009, 09:20 AM
What Jimmstruk said. I have a 1955 Craftsman 1/2" drill press with the typical slotted base. I got tired of chips falling down through them and filling up under the base. I took a piece of 1/8" stainless plate and welded four pins in it. I just set that down on top of the base and the pins line up with the holes and keep it from moving.
I did the same thing but as a woodworker (at that time) did it with
a peice of "Masonite" and two little strips of wood glued to it.
Keeps the sawdust and chips out from under.
...lew...

JMS6449
05-19-2009, 09:23 AM
If there are tee slots, clamps would be logical, and the head of a drill press does move up and down.

bborr01
05-19-2009, 09:32 AM
The slots in the table are for clamping your vise or your workpiece down. You can also just clamp your clamp to the table and put your vise against it to keep it from spinning if it grabs.
The slots in the base as stated above are for drilling long objects that are too tall to fit on the table. Sometimes you need to use spacers to achieve the right height.

Carld
05-19-2009, 09:37 AM
It should be obvious that the table can be swung out of the way and work mounted on the base and the head lowered to drill tall heavy work.

On the other hand, on some drill presses the head can only be lowered about half way but the work can be spaced up toward the head.

JMS6449
05-19-2009, 09:51 AM
Of course the last (3) replies are sarcastic.

As stated in a previous post,"open your eyes,ears and mind!

Carld
05-19-2009, 10:09 AM
I wouldn't say sarcastic as much as blunt observations. There comes a point at which the mind should say;

"Well, let me see, this table has slots in it and the base has slots in it. Can I reasonably assume that the slots in the base can be used just like the table slots with a taller work piece and drop the head down to drill it? Well, I believe that is posible, yes, I can do that and the holes in the corners, well I believe I can bolt the drill press to the floor with them."

Now that would be a perceptive mind that is using common sense and logic to solve a question.

Now this post is somewhat sarcastic I suppose ;) .

Scishopguy
05-19-2009, 01:40 PM
I did the same thing but as a woodworker (at that time) did it with
a peice of "Masonite" and two little strips of wood glued to it.
Keeps the sawdust and chips out from under.
...lew...

I too cover up the base plate with masonite due to the "Murphy Factor" that states that the tiny drill bit that you fumble and drop from the chuck will fall straight through the slot into the abyss. :D

andy_b
05-19-2009, 11:47 PM
none of my drill presses have movable heads. i think the t-slots in the bases is just one of those things where 80 years ago some DPs had movable heads, and no one ever bothered to change the base designs when the heads became immovable.

andy b.

Rich Carlstedt
05-19-2009, 11:52 PM
The same bases fellows were also used for table models.
Also, some tables can rotate 90 degrees, allowing a vise to be clamped on the table and another on the base for holding and centerdrilling long shafts
Rich

Paul Alciatore
05-20-2009, 12:03 AM
Give me a few minutes, I am going to take some pictures.

Paul Alciatore
05-20-2009, 02:29 AM
Here's the problem on a small drill press:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v55/EPAIII/P17NP18.jpg

Table is too high at it's lowest position and base is too low. I don't know how many times I was at this point and just grumbled. So I bought some 1/2" aluminum plate and solved it:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v55/EPAIII/P21Reduced.jpg

Three sets of blocks and a table. I thought it would be better to use some tapped holes instead of the slots in the base, but the flat, machinned base made this possible. The risers will mount either vertically or horizontally to give me 1/2" increments in table height. The top of the new table is 2.5" above the base in the photo. I may make a pair of 1/4" spacers one day, but for now, I haven't seen any real need.

Now I can use the full range of the drill press.

Oops, I just noticed that I forgot to reverse the right hand photo the final time. It is mirror reversed. Sorry about that.

garagemark
05-20-2009, 07:48 AM
I suppose sarcasm is just a fact of the internet. Easy to slam and deride people when they know you will never see them face to face. We are all larger than life behind this keyboard. Oh, and it would also be really cool to be as smart as some of those people. Anyway...

I don't have a little twenty pound bench press- I have a very damn big bench model drill press. It is not configured like Paul's, in that it does not have the enlarged opening on the end to accept a carriage type bolt. If I wanted to mount clamps or fixtures, I would have to either make some type of flat bar nut/stud to put through the slot and then rotate 90 degrees, or I'd have to tilt the DP to put bolts up through the bottom. Bit of a pain to lay a two hundred pound drill press over to shove bolts up through, don't ya think? And since I have never seen a ready made fixture to easily clamp down under these conditions, I still question the real usefulness for slots in the base. I'm sure to get some thought process help though.

I figured out twenty years ago that I might swing the table away to mount a fixture. However, I also figured out twenty years ago that it would take some doing. Thank you Paul for the pics of how you solved part of the problem. I may indeed grind bolt holes in the base someday, but I still want a fixture to easily allow some travel up and and down. My base is way too deep to be set up for an operation without lots of different sized cribbing (those are blocks of different sizes to lift an object closer to the drill bit for all the non thinkers), and nothing is ever just the right height to just set on the base and drill.

Cheers,
Mark

Sarcasic is as sarcasic does.

JCHannum
05-20-2009, 07:48 AM
I don't know if I have ever seen a drill press that did not have a moveable head. Some heavy duty types might, but the round column design is almost universal.

On the other hand, a drill press without a table but with a slotted base is a rather common sight, particularly bench models in production shops. Multiple spindle or gang drills are quite common. These are tables with two or more drill presses mounted on them. Again, no separate table, just the large, common base.

Paul Alciatore
05-20-2009, 11:37 AM
I suppose sarcasm is just a fact of the internet. Easy to slam and deride people when they know you will never see them face to face. We are all larger than life behind this keyboard. Oh, and it would also be really cool to be as smart as some of those people. Anyway...

I don't have a little twenty pound bench press- I have a very damn big bench model drill press. It is not configured like Paul's, in that it does not have the enlarged opening on the end to accept a carriage type bolt. If I wanted to mount clamps or fixtures, I would have to either make some type of flat bar nut/stud to put through the slot and then rotate 90 degrees, or I'd have to tilt the DP to put bolts up through the bottom. Bit of a pain to lay a two hundred pound drill press over to shove bolts up through, don't ya think? And since I have never seen a ready made fixture to easily clamp down under these conditions, I still question the real usefulness for slots in the base. I'm sure to get some thought process help though.

I figured out twenty years ago that I might swing the table away to mount a fixture. However, I also figured out twenty years ago that it would take some doing. Thank you Paul for the pics of how you solved part of the problem. I may indeed grind bolt holes in the base someday, but I still want a fixture to easily allow some travel up and and down. My base is way too deep to be set up for an operation without lots of different sized cribbing (those are blocks of different sizes to lift an object closer to the drill bit for all the non thinkers), and nothing is ever just the right height to just set on the base and drill.

Cheers,
Mark

Sarcasic is as sarcasic does.

Did my post come across as sarcastic? I certainly did not intend it that way. Just as a possible way of using the base.

I know the drill press I did it on is small. But the same principle would work for any size, just scale it up. The trick is to make blocks that increase in a manner that allows a minimum number of pairs to stack up to any desired distance. Start with the table thickness and keep doubling it. So for a full sized drill press you might start with a 1" thick table and make blocks that are 1", 2", 4", 8", 16", and perhaps 32". Those 13 parts would allow any distance from 1" to 64" in increments of 1".

Screws could not be found that long, but threaded rod would be good. Perhaps in different sizes, again in a sequence of multiples and with coupling nuts like the ones in the standard clamping sets. Where there's a will, there's a way.

I have a full sized drill press at work and it took four of us to stand it up after assembly so I would have to agree that upending such a monster to insert bolts is out of the question. However, they do make Tee nuts that can be inserted from the top of the slots so you do not have to make them. They are skinny enough to fit through the slot and then you rotate them to engage the wings.

Check out "Rotary Tee Nut" or part number 1-904-25755 here:

http://www.kbctools.com/usa/main.cfm

There are two different brands on the catalog page so it is a fairly standard item. But they only rotate 45 degrees, not 90. I can see where they would also be handy if you are doing a fairly complicated setup with a large of heavy work piece and discover you need another tee nut in the middle when the set up is almost complete.

garagemark
05-20-2009, 12:21 PM
Paul, my post was absolutely not aimed at you in any way, shape, or form. On the contrary, I thanked you for the pics. That's the kind of stuff I wanted to see. Solutions. I didn't need a smart a** telling me to think. I may have been born during the day, but it wasn't yesterday.

I am sorry if you though I was referring to you. I was not at all.

Regards,
Mark

BadDog
05-20-2009, 01:05 PM
Most any common style drill press I've seen (there are exceptions) has a head that can move up and down on the post. They may not have a rack and toggle bolt for easy adjustment (though many do), but they do have a hole in the top that would allow moving the head should you be suitably inclined to do so. Even my 700+ lb 20" VSG could be moved, though I would need a lift to do so. There is even a hole in the belt/drive cover to allow this, though it was clearly not intended to be a daily occurrence.

The base of my VSG has a several hundred pound casting, complete with ground surface and full-on Bridgeport sized t-slots (like the table, uses the same clamp hardware as my 2J). In an industrial setting, the head could be dropped, the post cut, table removed, and the whole thing mounted to a suitable stand/table. Then a fixture bolted to the base and production begins. These features could surely be used to get a HSM out of an otherwise inescapable bind, but certainly not something you are likely to use on a regular basis in a home shop. At the moment my nicely ground t-slot base is used to support/store my various drill indexes.

Carld
05-20-2009, 02:19 PM
None of the posts on the first page were sarcastic or intended to be that way. It's mostly how the reader of the post takes what the poster said. In fact what JMS6449 posted on the second page was his feeling that they were sarcastic when in fact nothing sarcastic was said by anyone and he may have said it as a joke. The reply I made after him was intended to show what sarcasim would be if it had been posted out of the context of my post #12.

In most cases a person percieves what they do in the frame of mind at the time they read it. That is, if they are in a good mood they may take a reply to be good but if they are angry or upset about something they may take offense at a statement.

Many times I and others post a reply that is short and to the point and people that like a long winded reply with lots of detail take offense at a short to the point reply.

I can tell you for a fact there was no sarcasim in my first post and that I was being the devils advocate about the implication of any sarcasim in the second post and I don't see where a rational person could take offense in any of the posts in this thread.

ahidley
05-20-2009, 02:23 PM
BadDog/russ Isnt it hard to find the drill indexes, located on the machined base, under the huge pile of ever growing chips????

ohhh....... Sorry.... I didnt see the "master floor sweeper" part!!



(uhooo, I guess mine was sarcastic, but it was ment in a funny way.)

Seastar
05-20-2009, 07:37 PM
I have two drill presses in my shop - a 13" Craftsman floor model and a 15" Craftsman floor model.
Neither of them have a head that will move down the shaft/post.
Both of them have slots in the base.
I cannot see any practical use for the slots in the base.
They are much too far away from the head to be of any use unless you use some tall spacers that would be far too "floppy" to hold any kind of reasonable tollerance.
No matter what Carld says, I view the slots in the base as useless.
My original post in this thread stands---
I have often wondered what the slots are for -----
This is not sarcastic -- others were IMHO.
Bill

Carld
05-20-2009, 07:58 PM
There is something you are overlooking. The base may and probably is used on several models of drill presses. The fact that your drill press head will not go to the base is not indicative of all drill presses. In fact I gave my son a Craftsman drill press I bought in 1968 that has slots in the base and the head goes ALL THE WAY to the base as does the table. I moved the table and head to the base when I moved it around. It is very likely that the manufacturer of the Craftsman drill presses uses the same base on several brands of drill presses they make for various retailers.

If your drill press head will not go down low enough to use the base that is your problem but others do have a drill press that the head will go all the way to the base. At this time I have a Horible Freight drill press and the table will go all the way down but the head will not. It will go down about half way and with some creative thinking I can use the base if I want to.

Just because the base can't be used on one model of drill press doesn't mean it can't be used on others. Don't fall into the trap of, "If it won't work on mine it won't work on anyones". The mind is a creative thing and if the desire is there many things can be accomplished. Non creative minds can do very limited things.

Seastar
05-21-2009, 09:47 AM
OK - I guess the answer to my question is - Because the manufacturer made all of the bases alike - even if the slots were virtually useless on some models.
That makes sense.
My mind has been opened ----

Now I wonder why my 13" Craftsman has a different SIZE base than my 15" Craftsman. They should have made them the same.
For that matter they should have sold a single model (14") to save the number of parts stocked.

Lew Hartswick
05-21-2009, 09:58 AM
Now I wonder why my 13" Craftsman has a different SIZE base than my 15" Craftsman. They should have made them the same.
For that matter they should have sold a single model (14") to save the number of parts stocked.

Sarcasm ?????
...lew...

Seastar
05-21-2009, 07:30 PM
Sarcasm ?????
Who me ??????
Absolutely not!

Carld
05-21-2009, 10:46 PM
;) Well, that worked, I figered I could get some **** started. :D

R W
05-22-2009, 05:43 AM
I cannot see any practical use for the slots in the base
No matter what Carld says, I view the slots in the base as useless.
My original post in this thread stands---

Bill
Would have to disagree.
Have a flat belt drive pedestal drill (3MT) on which the table
goes down almost to the slotted base.
There are occassions when the slotted base could be utilized,
on its own or in conjunction with the drill table. Examples would end drilling
lengths of round or square, jobs that are to high be mounted on the
table.

JCHannum
05-22-2009, 07:28 AM
The reason some of you cannot understand the use of the slots is because you have never needed to use them. Like many other machine features, they are there for a purpose. If you ever do need to use them, you will be glad they are there, until that time comes, find something else to worry about.

Seastar
05-22-2009, 08:12 AM
"find something else to worry about"
Never said I worried about it --- just said I "wondered".
I hope some day that I will find a use for the slots -- then they will no longer be "useless". HE HE HE!
Bill

Your Old Dog
05-23-2009, 06:42 AM
Greens and fiber. You should all eat more greens and fiber.

Let me stray to the topic at hand. I just figured the bottom slots on the stand were to help you incase you ever needed to swing the table for a larger piece. Instead of welding the work to the bottom you could chain it or bolt it if need be.

gnm109
05-23-2009, 07:13 AM
"find something else to worry about"
Never said I worried about it --- just said I "wondered".
I hope some day that I will find a use for the slots -- then they will no longer be "useless". HE HE HE!
Bill


They aren't useless. They also collect chips and dirt. That is a purpose, I'm sure you'd agree.

Rustybolt
05-23-2009, 07:55 AM
What are the slots in a drill press base for?


They're for storing small drills and also swarf to jab in your hand later.

gnm109
05-23-2009, 10:04 AM
What are the slots in a drill press base for?


They're for storing small drills and also swarf to jab in your hand later.


Yeah, I forgot all of the little parts and tools like drills that disappear into the slots. As I mentioned earlier, I cover them with a sheet of stainless with four pins welded in so it drops onto the slots.

Paul Alciatore
05-23-2009, 12:54 PM
gnm just gave me an idea. Instead of storing my add on table in a bin when it is not in use, I can just screw it down to the base and it will keep most of the chips out. I guess I can stuff my drill press rag in the hole to stop that up too. And that gives me more room in my "Drill Press" bin. Thanks.