PDA

View Full Version : Milling Machine Ring Light



BigBoy1
05-25-2009, 06:51 AM
A while back I remember seeing a ring light which fit over the mill spindle and provided light to the work surface. I tried a search but got nothing that was related to what I was looking for. Are these ring lights commercially available or are they a home projects? I'd like to get/make one for my friend's CNC mill as he has expressed concern about not being able to see what is happening. He has done me many favors and I'd to pay a few back by getting/making this light for him. The light must be coolant proof. One has to remember that I'm electrically challanged so any instructions/part information must be simple. Thanks.

NiftyNev
05-25-2009, 07:22 AM
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=34150&highlight=Quill+light

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=33470&highlight=LED+Quill+light

Nev

Evan
05-25-2009, 09:46 AM
The general consensus was that they aren't bright enough. The LEDs used in those lights are the cheapest available and won't last if driven to a reasonable brightness. It also isn't as simple as just hooking up some external power or even batteries. The light is designed around the amount of power that can be delivered by the internal batteries and any other type will probably result in a much shorter lifetime of the LEDs unless it is properly regulated.

Bill Pace
05-25-2009, 11:08 AM
One of those on the spindle light threads was mine and Evan is right - I was disappointed in the results with brightness and after letting the smoke out of the first one pretty quickly and then a second one died also, in spite of tinkering with the volt/amp supply, I just abandoned the whole idea:( --- sure was a cool looking set-up tho;)

deltaenterprizes
05-25-2009, 09:03 PM
Mine is still working great, I used a 5v power supply from a dead 2WIRE brand modem. I must have gotten lucky for once.

BigBoy1
05-26-2009, 06:42 AM
The general consensus was that they aren't bright enough. The LEDs used in those lights are the cheapest available and won't last if driven to a reasonable brightness. It also isn't as simple as just hooking up some external power or even batteries. The light is designed around the amount of power that can be delivered by the internal batteries and any other type will probably result in a much shorter lifetime of the LEDs unless it is properly regulated.


Evan,

My thinking was to use some of the very bright LEDs you have used to make your outdoor light and make a ring light for the mill with those bright LEDs. It was my thinking but being electrically challanged, you can probably sight a dozen reasons why they won't work..

Evan
05-26-2009, 09:06 AM
Making one from scratch is the way to go. The high power LEDs are a lot less fussy about variations in supply current. The ones I used recently for the flood lamp can be operated on anything from about .25 amp up to 1 amp as long as they are kept cool enough. Even at .25 amp they are still too bright to look at comfortably. If you use a few of those all you need to do is wire them in parallel and power them from a 1 amp 5 or 6 volt DC power brick (wall wart). As long as nothing overheats you are good to go. You should always use at least three LEDs in a work light, more if possible. They cast very sharp edge shadows because the actual source of light is so small. By using several the effect is to spread out the source.

biometrics
05-26-2009, 09:52 AM
Bob Warfields site Second project on this page:

http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCWishListFutures.htm

sid pileski
05-26-2009, 12:08 PM
Evan- I never said my light wasn't bright enough? Works well.
While I didn't buy the LEDs they aren't cheap @ $3-$4.
I think they are the same type used on your outdoor light.
Just not mounted on the hex board.

Sid

Evan
05-26-2009, 12:58 PM
I was speaking of the plastic camping light with the regular 5mm LEDs. There is a world of difference between those and the high power emitters.