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Dawai
06-15-2009, 10:12 PM
Veterans in Tennessee, Georgia and South Florida have been notified in recent months they may have contracted HIV or hepatitis from faulty equipment and procedures at Veterans Affairs hospitals. Here is a chronology of events:

April 23, 2003: Endoscopic equipment is installed at Alvin C. York VA Medical Center in Murfreesboro containing an incorrect valve that may have allowed body fluid residue to transfer from patient to patient during colonoscopies. The procedure inserts a narrow, flexible tube fitted with a scope into the body. The equipment is made by Olympus American Inc.

May 2004: VA’s Miami hospital may have begun contaminated endoscopic procedures using the same equipment. A tube that was supposed to be cleaned after each colonoscopy was instead cleaned at the end of each day.

Jan. 2, 2008: VA’s Augusta, Ga., ear, nose and throat clinic may have begun contaminated endoscopic procedures using the same equipment.

Nov. 6, 2008: Improper cleaning procedure at Augusta clinic corrected.

Dec. 1, 2008: Equipment mistake in Murfreesboro discovered. About three weeks later, VA contacts other facilities about equipment problem.

Feb. 9: In response to problems, VA begins sending out notification letters to veterans offering free testing — about 6,800 at Murfreesboro and 1,070 at Augusta. VA also calls for a special training campaign on safety — called a “Step-Up” — from March 14 at all 153 medical centers.

March: Improper cleaning procedure at Miami hospital discovered, affecting up to 2,400 veterans. Mail notifications begin to those veterans.

April 1: VA announces 11 Murfreesboro hospital patients have tested positive for hepatitis. Six patients from Augusta tested positive.

April 3: VA announces 3,174 veterans areas have been notified of the results of HIV testing.

April 17: VA announces a Murfreesboro hospital patient tested positive for HIV.

May 1: VA announces total of 18 Murfreesboro hospital patients have tested positive for hepatitis. Nineteen patients from Miami and Augusta have tested positive for viruses; four of those positive tests were for HIV.

May 18: VA records show about 8,000 of the 10,500 possibly affected patients have been notified of their follow-up blood test results.

May 21: VA officials give Congress a briefing, drawing criticism for not proceeding quickly enough with notifications.

June 1: VA reports at Murfreesboro a total of 25 have tested positive for hepatitis, one for HIV. At Miami, 11 have tested positive for hepatitis, three for HIV. At Augusta, nine have tested positive for hepatitis, two for HIV.

Coming June 16 and June 24: Congressional hearings in Washington to look into what caused the problems and what the VA has done to fix them.

— SOURCE: Compiled by The Leaf-Chronicle from Veterans Affairs, Associated Press and Gannett Tennessee reports and archives.

http://www.theleafchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090614/NEWS01/906140360&template=printart

My father and Oldest brother used this facility.

gunbuilder
06-15-2009, 11:35 PM
Dave,
The VA isn't the only place like that.
"Blood-Borne Disease Exposure At Dakota Dunes Clinic

A disturbing find has a Dakota Dunes Medical Clinic offering free testing for blood-borne illnesses.

At Siouxland Urology Center, the South Dakota Department of Health found that single-use products, such as saline solution bags and tubing, were being used on more than one patient undergoing cystoscopy procedures.

Because of the risk of blood-borne infections such as Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and HIV, the clinic has changed its procedures and is contacting more than 5,000 patients." from Keloland News web site.

I hope your relatives are OK.

Thanks,
Paul

Dawai
06-16-2009, 08:01 AM
My father is deceased, a couple years now. I think he'll be okay.

Older brother is not speaking to me because of differences of opinion on settling Mother's estate.
He's the admin, I'm the loud-mouth. I have been reading Georgia law.. ain't nothing worse that a book read hillbilly.

This was on the NBC news last night. THE guy they featured was positive, then later negative. Him and his wife and family now all exposed though this series of tests.

We need to take care of the ones who have taken care of our country. Somebody needs some jail time for incompetence. With our "notme" attitude, nobody is to blame.

gnm109
06-16-2009, 08:06 AM
If this is an example of a government-run health program, God help us. :mad:

andy_b
06-16-2009, 10:11 AM
If this is an example of a government-run health program, God help us. :mad:

i was thinking the exact same thing. i can't wait.

andy b.

MickeyD
06-16-2009, 11:47 AM
Sounds like they bought equipment from a reputable vendor (Olympus) that had a faulty valve. How is this different from the private hospitals that had the same problems? And, more importantly, how does this relate to home shop machining?

saltmine
06-16-2009, 12:28 PM
My youngest brother really suffered at the hands of an Az. and a Calif. VA hospital. He had diabetes, which causes circulatory problems in the extremities, among other things. Both hospitals treated his right leg and foot with numerous braces and medications. Fortunately, he got married and moved to Des Moines, Iowa with his bride. The first visit to the VA there revealed that the California and Arizona VA had been making braces and prescribing drugs for a broken foot for five years. The foot was properly cared for and his need for medication and braces ended.

Midwestern VA hospitals, for the most part, are worlds better than southwestern hospitals...

But, I expect government run healthcare will "level the playing field".....After all, it was the Federal Government that took over a Nevada Cathouse, and went broke trying to sell sex.

Arcane
06-16-2009, 12:50 PM
On May 25, I discovered I had a problem urinating...blood in urine, what little there was of it. Soft blood clots had blocked the opening to the urethra. A trip to the emergency room and I was draining approximately 30 minutes after I left home. Two days later, tests showed I had a large tumour on my right kidney, it had to come out.(the tumour itself was over 8 cm in each of the two dimensions that was shown on a CT scan). Tests also showed I was officially a diabetic. On June 10, I underwent surgery to remove the kidney and tumour and 2 days later I was up and walking a bit. Yesterday I came home. (A nice way to kick off my retirement on June 1, eh?)
I live in Saskatchewan, the HOME of government run health care. The total costs of everything I just experienced is nil to me, paid for from taxes I, and other taxpayers have paid over the years in lieu of an insurance premium. Costs are covered but there is nobody capitalizing on my illness to make a profit from it. I don't have to worry about a huge expensive bill now either or having to worry about some insurance company deciding to raise my premium rates exorbitantly or finding myself being uninsurable because someone decides I am too much of a risk to cover. What I just went through is an example of a government-run health program.
"If this is an example of a government-run health program, God help us"?....I would say he already has.

Dawai
06-16-2009, 12:58 PM
Here? a old biker buddy is having heart troubles.. the tests were going to be over 10k, little insurance.

The doctor looked at him and smiled, said.. you got a house don't you? (how was he going to pay for it).. My buddy got his hat, coat, took the pain in his chest and went home to his house.

He still survives, living in his house. Not homeless. Healthcare can make you homeless, when you get to retirement age, they take it all to put you into a room and give poor treatment.

I'm another day closer to that. When they finally sign me into a retirement home they better have a firm grip on the "bike, or streetrod keys" I'll be that plume of smoke in the distance, finally finding out what "she'll do"... Who knows, that might be tomorrow? My wife has threatened me with adult daycare.

pcarpenter
06-16-2009, 01:06 PM
Socialized medicine has not been around long enough or exclusive enough to have its real results show, however. You speak of "profit" with malice in your voice. Profit is the reason that we have a whole lot of the cures or curative medicines, or great talented surgeons etc. Take that profit motive away on a global basis and I would expect our rate of discovery of new medical breakthroughs to drop rapidly. When there is no or little financial incentive to put money at risk in development and experimentation, there will be less of it. It's basic economics.

I hope your outcome is good overall. I would not want to be someone in a "low percentage" category in a socialized medical system. If a person's survivability rate goes down below a certain point, then it essentially goes to zero since they won't get care that has a lower possibility of results...that too is basic economics.

I just got done having a sleep study to see if I have apnea (last night). I too will pay very little...because I and my employer have purchased health insurance...not because I expect the rest of the country to pay for it for me.

Me...I want a doctor who likes to make a profit from being really really good at what he does.

Paul

mwechtal
06-16-2009, 01:39 PM
Yep, socialized medicine in Canada is great - for the US. We have several Canadian doctors in my little upstate NY area. They say that their wages in Canada will never pay off their college loans. So, they work here, and travel home on weekends.

tryp
06-20-2009, 12:09 PM
Ha! They are lying to you.

What they meant to say is that their extravagant standard of living and desire to live in a popular area requires them to work for cash in the US on the side to help make the house payments for the 750k mortgage they have.

I have a friend out west that just graduated med school and finished her residency on Vancouver Island. Med students can get loans for over 100 thousand dollars, they live very richly when they are in school many have houses and a partner. And when they finish up their paid residency they can easily clear six figures a year, if they work in an area that isnt as desireable to live in(small town) the government will forgive most of their loans after some 3 or 4 years.

If you are a physician in a small town you can easily make 2-300k a year. In larger towns you can do private work on the side. Your doctor friends are bull****ting you, they should just come out and say that they work in the US because they can make twice as much money. Bottom line: Greed.

Liger Zero
06-20-2009, 02:47 PM
Sounds like they bought equipment from a reputable vendor (Olympus) that had a faulty valve. How is this different from the private hospitals that had the same problems? And, more importantly, how does this relate to home shop machining?

A good number of our posters here are vets so they should be made aware of what is happening.

Plus we can make fun of the company that can't machine a valve properly, I'm sure one of us could have done a better job. :D

Your Old Dog
06-20-2009, 10:21 PM
.............................
I hope your outcome is good overall. I would not want to be someone in a "low percentage" category in a socialized medical system. If a person's survivability rate goes down below a certain point, then it essentially goes to zero since they won't get care that has a lower possibility of results...that too is basic economics. ..................


Paul

Ain't that the truth! The parking lot at Roswell Cancer Hospital in Buffalo has as many Canadian liscense plates in it as New York plates. Not all of our friends up north can wait until the government determines they can have a screening test or operation, many of them come here if they can afford it.

oldtiffie
06-21-2009, 08:47 AM
Veterans in Tennessee, Georgia and South Florida have been notified in recent months they may have contracted HIV or hepatitis from faulty equipment and procedures at Veterans Affairs hospitals. Here is a chronology of events:

April 23, 2003: Endoscopic equipment is installed at Alvin C. York VA Medical Center in Murfreesboro containing an incorrect valve that may have allowed body fluid residue to transfer from patient to patient during colonoscopies. The procedure inserts a narrow, flexible tube fitted with a scope into the body. The equipment is made by Olympus American Inc.

May 2004: VA’s Miami hospital may have begun contaminated endoscopic procedures using the same equipment. A tube that was supposed to be cleaned after each colonoscopy was instead cleaned at the end of each day.

Jan. 2, 2008: VA’s Augusta, Ga., ear, nose and throat clinic may have begun contaminated endoscopic procedures using the same equipment.

Nov. 6, 2008: Improper cleaning procedure at Augusta clinic corrected.

Dec. 1, 2008: Equipment mistake in Murfreesboro discovered. About three weeks later, VA contacts other facilities about equipment problem.

Feb. 9: In response to problems, VA begins sending out notification letters to veterans offering free testing — about 6,800 at Murfreesboro and 1,070 at Augusta. VA also calls for a special training campaign on safety — called a “Step-Up” — from March 14 at all 153 medical centers.

March: Improper cleaning procedure at Miami hospital discovered, affecting up to 2,400 veterans. Mail notifications begin to those veterans.

April 1: VA announces 11 Murfreesboro hospital patients have tested positive for hepatitis. Six patients from Augusta tested positive.

April 3: VA announces 3,174 veterans areas have been notified of the results of HIV testing.

April 17: VA announces a Murfreesboro hospital patient tested positive for HIV.

May 1: VA announces total of 18 Murfreesboro hospital patients have tested positive for hepatitis. Nineteen patients from Miami and Augusta have tested positive for viruses; four of those positive tests were for HIV.

May 18: VA records show about 8,000 of the 10,500 possibly affected patients have been notified of their follow-up blood test results.

May 21: VA officials give Congress a briefing, drawing criticism for not proceeding quickly enough with notifications.

June 1: VA reports at Murfreesboro a total of 25 have tested positive for hepatitis, one for HIV. At Miami, 11 have tested positive for hepatitis, three for HIV. At Augusta, nine have tested positive for hepatitis, two for HIV.

Coming June 16 and June 24: Congressional hearings in Washington to look into what caused the problems and what the VA has done to fix them.

— SOURCE: Compiled by The Leaf-Chronicle from Veterans Affairs, Associated Press and Gannett Tennessee reports and archives.



http://www.theleafchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090614/NEWS01/906140360&template=printart

My father and Oldest brother used this facility.

David.

I make a point of not commenting on how people generally and Veterans in particular are treated medically in other countries.

That post of yours was excellent and very topical. I am not aware of anything similar in Australia (aka OZ).

Suffice to say that I am a Veteran and have reason to take an interest in things Urological and related Radiology.

I thought you may be interested in this article from the New York Times - I subscribe to the on-line edition.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/21/health/21radiation.html?th&emc=th