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View Full Version : G3617 Horizontal / Vertical Mill what do you think



Brett
06-18-2009, 02:02 AM
So I sold my mill drill and Iam looking at this one G3617 Horizontal / Vertical Mill. Do you guys think it will work will for model engineering, I work on small stuff, or should I say would you buy one Brett

oldtiffie
06-18-2009, 03:32 AM
Given the chance I'd break my bloody leg/neck to get there and get it!!

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Horizontal-Vertical-Mill/G3617

I've seen it at my dealers shop here in OZ and was very impressed. I first spotted it a couple of years ago.

I have no reason to doubt that it will do all that you require.

I, probably like you, have single phase 230v (50 cycles here) and while I have plenty of it, I can't justify putting in 3-phase (yet anyway!!!). I'd have DRO's put on it or put them on. I'd like to have the "nodding" head but I can well live without that as I have a good tilting table that will do most of what I want. If "tramming" requires any "nod" adjustment it has to be done by shimming at the tilting faces. No big deal as its the same with my HF-45 square column mill.

I'd love to fit a slotting head on that mill when - sorry "if" - I buy it but has a 3-phase motor but I'd soon change that to 1 phase or DC.
https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Products?stockCode=M225

Gavin
06-18-2009, 04:50 AM
oldtiffie

What's the OZ equivalent? I'm suffering with a very old, very worn, round column Taiwanese mill and would like to update when her indoors agrees.

A.K. Boomer
06-18-2009, 09:20 AM
If that's ALL your going to be working on is small stuff model engineering Id say its way overkill, You could for the most part get by with a machine 1/4 to 1/3 the weight (and price) depending on what you mean by "small".
Now there will be a ton of guys saying "yeah but better to buy bigger in case you ever need it"
yes that can come in handy, but what also can come in handy is the extra cash in your wallet and not tripping over crap you don't really need for the rest of your life not to mention all the hassle with moving stuff like that and phase converters and over size ancillary components that you also don't need to go as big with (like an R/Table).
Not to mention bigger is not always better, If your parts are really small bigger can be downright clumsy and even time consuming...

bob ward
06-18-2009, 09:55 AM
I bought the single phase NT30 Hare & Forbes version about a year ago and I'm quite pleased with it, but then this machining business is all very new to me so I may not know any better.

https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Products?stockCode=M161

You definitely need at least the 2 axis DRO while you are spending money.

One slight negative, belt changing is a bit of a tussle. In hindsight the 3 phase model and a speed controller would have been a better option.

kvom
06-18-2009, 10:38 AM
Using the horizontal spindle without the arbor support will not be very rigid. To use the arbor support you would need to untram the head and rotate the ram.

oldtiffie
06-18-2009, 12:15 PM
oldtiffie

What's the OZ equivalent? I'm suffering with a very old, very worn, round column Taiwanese mill and would like to update when her indoors agrees.

Gavin.

I guess you are in OZ.

Bob Ward's machine (lucky bugger!!!) is the basic machine that I'd go for at:
https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Products?stockCode=M161

But if I had the need and the money I'd go for the model with the two arbor supports as I prefer as much rigidity and support to the arbor as possible - and it has fitted 3-axis DRO's at:
https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Products?stockCode=M161D

I am not the least concerned about belt-changing of lack of 3-phase/speed control, nor am I concerned about swinging the over-head arm and having to re-tram the mill. They are only a couple of minutes to do.

I wouldn't need the swiveling table as I don't see me doing any spiral milling work - which will require gearing and either a universal or compound/differential dividing head - not cheap and a PITA to set up and do and is very prone to calculation errors. I will do that on my Seig X3 mill-drill which has yet to be converted to 4-axis CNC (when-ever!!!). But the swiveling table is there, like it or not, and its no problem - but will have to be re-set if "bumped" too hard - which is not a problem either.

For those in the US, OK and Canada:
a. conversion is $AU x 0.8 = $US.

b. GST is the OZ Goods and Services Tax = 10% add on to sale price.

Bruce Griffing
06-18-2009, 03:13 PM
I don't have that mill, but my concern would be daylight under the spindle. Add a vise and some tooling, and there is not much room left with just over 13".

Bill McLeod
06-18-2009, 03:25 PM
I have a 3617 and I like it. One issue is is trying to tram in both the vertical and horizontal is going to take some time. I had to shim the top of the column to get the vertical head true, this effects the support for the horizontal and it's relationship to the fixed arbour in the column causing more shimming. I am no expert in any of this and there might be another way but I missed it.
That is the only problem I had it just took time to solve.

SGW
06-18-2009, 09:19 PM
Bruce raises a valid point about the relatively limited height clearance, but on the other hand my mill has only about 12.5" maximum clearance and I've managed to do everything I've wanted to do, one way or another, for about 25 years. While it's certainly something to consider as you evaluate, I wouldn't rate it an automatic show-stopper. The H/V capacity of that mill will give you greater setup flexibility that will make more things possible.

doctor demo
06-18-2009, 09:56 PM
I have a 3617 and I like it. One issue is is trying to tram in both the vertical and horizontal is going to take some time. I had to shim the top of the column to get the vertical head true, this effects the support for the horizontal and it's relationship to the fixed arbour in the column causing more shimming. I am no expert in any of this and there might be another way but I missed it.
That is the only problem I had it just took time to solve.

Bill is the outboard horiz. support and the vertical fixed in relation to each other? Or am I missing Your point?

Steve

Ps
I was in Nanimo for a few weeks back in '78 visiting a (now ex ) sister in law. As I recall it is a great little fishing town.