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radkins
06-23-2009, 02:01 PM
I just threw away another pair of "quality" safety glasses due to excessive scratching causing distortion. How about a recommendation on a decent pair of glasses that are at least a little bit durable and scratch resistant? It seems that no matter what I pay for a pair of these things and no matter how carefully I clean them, even with tissue, they will scratch and mar in short order! Why can't they make them more durable? I once made a temporary safety shield from a clear plastic packing box (I was in a bind and it sure beat nothing!) and that darn thing was 10 times more scratch resistant than a real pair of safety glasses. If a stinkin' plastic box cover is scratch resistant why are the safety lens so soft? That thing laid on top of my tool box for nearly a year and the few times I used it the darn thing cleaned up just fine! :confused:

Peter.
06-23-2009, 02:32 PM
Never clean safety-specs with tissue - it scratches the lenses. Use Bounty kitchen roll.

Scratching is inevitable, just buy cheap specs. The ones I wear are very light and comfortable and less than 1 each.

Liger Zero
06-23-2009, 02:40 PM
I buy the real glass ones, made out of coke-bottom glass or whatever. Really thick and heavy.

I'm not 100% comfortable with a thin sheet of plastic protecting my eyes from an ejected fragment.

Peter.
06-23-2009, 02:47 PM
I buy the real glass ones, made out of coke-bottom glass or whatever. Really thick and heavy.

I'm not 100% comfortable with a thin sheet of plastic protecting my eyes from an ejected fragment.

Tend to be uncomfortable over long perods and many change your natural focal length causing headaches. Heavier doesn't always mean stronger either, rigid structures transmit energy (or break) where more flexible ones absorb energy and deform. In the UK it's easy to tell what class of impact resistance a pair have by the code letter. The ones I wear I've trodden on several times without breaking them.

Carld
06-23-2009, 02:50 PM
Unless the glass lens is shatter proof it will get fragments in your eye. The plastic safety glasses are supposed to withstand impacts and not shatter. They are supposed to flex and not break.

I don't know how they could treat the glass so it would not break up in some form.

rockrat
06-23-2009, 02:51 PM
I get the pleasure of having to wear safety glasses because my eyesight is just bad enough that I squint when reading a dial or a rule. That leads to a headache after a day of use. Here is how I clean my glasses (polycarb) and get some life out of them.

1) Wash your hands first.

2) Swish the specs under running water in the sink. Never ever clean them dry with anything that will rub. All of the hard grit (grinding grit or metal chips) will start the scratching process. Moving them under running water takes off almost all of the bad scratchy stuff.

3) Run your hand under the water next to clean off anything that might have run on to it from the rinse. Using a liquid non-abrasive soap (Dawn or other dish detergent will work) get a bit on you finger and thumb and lightly move the soap around on the lenses.

4) Continue to lightly move the soap around and run your hand and the specs under the running water. Do this until you feel all of the slippery soap go away.

5) Using a new clean paper kitchen towel (the bounty type) lightly wipe the lenses dry. Continue to change the towel to a dry spot until the specs are dry.

Yes, I know this seems a bit much but it has served me well over the years and keeps my prescription specs as well as the cheap safety specs scratch free for longer than any other method I have tried.
rock~

Liger Zero
06-23-2009, 02:52 PM
I think it's a plastic coating like shatter-proof glass. Honestly don't know.

lazlo
06-23-2009, 02:56 PM
I buy whatever polycarbonate (Lexan) safety glasses are on sale at the usual suspects with "scratch resistant coating." They do last longer than the cheap safety glasses, especially if the shop isn't air conditioned and you're sweating a lot. I haven't had a pair that lasted more than 2 months though...

ckalley
06-23-2009, 03:14 PM
I second Rockrat's method. I have the polycarb lenses and sometimes it seems like they are a magnet for oil! The dish soap realy cuts thru the oil and gets you a nice clean lens.

Craig

radkins
06-23-2009, 03:31 PM
Ok, I just ordered 6 pair (AO Safety), shipping was the same as 1 pair, and at the same time I also ordered some cleaning cloths just for the glasses. Seems as if maybe I need to keep some clean rinse water in the shop since I don't have running water there yet to rinse the grit off before wiping, this last pair I just threw away was less than two weeks old. Still can't figure why that box cover was so much more durable and scratch resistant than real lens though but it probably has little impact resistance, I would not consider using a home-made safety lens but I just wondered why they can't make the real lens at least as good (scratch resistant) as a cheap box cover? :confused:

Jim Shaper
06-23-2009, 03:50 PM
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/Health/Safety/Products/Catalog/?PC_7_RJH9U5230GE3E02LES9MG812H2_nid=3QLG3HKGZ4gsQ QFFG1G8R7glMDNGRTJZRRbl

I got started wearing these when I worked at 3M. They hold up very well and don't give me the usual headache from long term use (which is typically 2hrs or less for other glasses to make the noggin ache).

They ain't cheap, but at a pair every other year right now - I don't care. :)

Peter.
06-23-2009, 04:51 PM
These are what we wear at work. Most major building sites in London are mandatory safety eyewear for all trades. They are Class 1 optical quality and very light. Impact resistance is Class F (low-energy impact, 45m/s) which is not suitable for percussion tools and certainly wouldn't stop an exploded abrasive wheel but then what would. They'd be perfect for keeping out flying chips from your flycutter. The best bit about them from my point of view is that they allow ear defenders to seal perfectly on your head - something that most wire-arm or round-arm glasses don't do and even if they do the arms get pressed uncomfortably into your head.

We use these for bright sunlight work and the ISE03X clear ones which strangely are not listed on the site.

http://www.safety-source.co.uk/product.asp?P_ID=7280&strPageHistory=related

gfphoto
06-23-2009, 05:05 PM
I also use Rockrat's method to clean my glass prescription lenses. Be careful to use a towel like Bounty - many others and face tissues have oils that and smear up lenses or a lot of lint. And almost hot water with very dilute liquid dish soap. (I like Ajax)

If the lenses are really dirty I use rubbing alcohol, gently, with the Bounty towel. 91% if you can get it. Then the dish soap method.

For working (home shop) I use a full face shield. That way I still have my prescription (glass) lenses and can see clearly. It goes on easily and tips up easily so I don't mind using it. Does get dirty so I wipe the plastic off once in awhile but because it's not so close to my eyes the dirt and wear on the plastic isn't such a problem.

Gary

rockrat
06-24-2009, 09:29 AM
I also use Rockrat's method to clean my glass prescription lenses. Be careful to use a towel like Bounty - many others and face tissues have oils that and smear up lenses or a lot of lint. And almost hot water with very dilute liquid dish soap. (I like Ajax)


Good point, I seem to remember grabbing a paper towel that was in a little box on the counter and having smears all over my specs. I read the box and the towels had shae butter (what ever the hell that is?) on them for the wifeys hands. That crap took twice as long to clean off as the way oil did.

rock~

Evan
06-24-2009, 10:45 AM
I just wondered why they can't make the real lens at least as good (scratch resistant) as a cheap box cover?

Easy. Things that are scratch resistant are hard. When you are talking plastic that also means brittle.

Deja Vu
06-24-2009, 04:44 PM
Some safety glasses are just better than others. I too agree with Rockrat's maintenance procedure. The lenses can be degraded further easily in the cleaning process.
Here's what I use too when the inevitable scratches do become too numerous and annoying:
http://www.tapplastics.com/shop/product.php?pid=113

It won't restore badly scratched glasses, but occasional use keeps the glasses to nearly original condition.

If left sitting between uses, that inevitable thin layer of dust can ruin the otherwise like-new glasses if it isn't carefully removed as rockrat advises.

Lew Hartswick
04-12-2010, 06:06 PM
Rockrat, That is what I do. Been wearing glasses for over 70 years.
Then about once a month I take the lenses out of the frames and
wash the grunge that gets along the rims and the nose peices better
than I can get at while still assembled.
...lew...

RTPBurnsville
04-12-2010, 06:23 PM
I pretty much follow RockRat's advise except I never wipe them with anything other than a 100% clean cotton cloth. My prescription safety glasses (plastic lense) are a couple years old, get heavy use, and are still almost scratch free.

Black_Moons
04-12-2010, 06:28 PM
Hmmm.
Headlight polishing kit success + old pited glasses...

Of course, your likey to start distorting them after a few polishs.. but maybe.. just maybe.. some of those old pitted glasses could become usable?

goose
04-12-2010, 07:00 PM
I've got three pair laying around the shop. Never a problem locating one, and relying on multiplies "evens out" the wear. When they get scratchy, toss them and buy new. If you follow Rockrat's method, they'll last at least a year, or more. I like to keep my eyewear clean and high clarity, they can (should) be considered as important a tool as any in your shop. Would any of us want to work with dull end mills or a mill out of tram? Same thing. Figure less than $20 per year for eye protection.


Gary

bobw53
04-12-2010, 08:46 PM
My eyeglass guy, who machines his own lenses(eyeglass machinist??), suggested using compressed air to dry off your glasses instead of rubbing them with anything.

Of course I'm only around compressed air 100+ hours a week and have never taken his advise.

Your Old Dog
04-12-2010, 09:35 PM
I clean my spectacles same way I clean my testicle, in running water with gentle rubbing until any grit is flushed away. I try not to spend any more time on one then the other...

Your Old Dog
04-12-2010, 09:38 PM
I clean my spectacles same way I clean my testicle, in running water with gentle rubbing until any grit is flushed away. I try not to spend any more time on one then the other...

To be serious for a moment, don't use your t-shirt if your wife uses fabric softener in the laundry. Clothing that has had fabric softener applied to it absolutely scratches plastics. We don't use fabric softener and I used to clean my tv camera lenses with my t-shirt. Also, more optics are ruined by over cleaning. Seems some people have to clean the fragile lens coating every time they pick up their glasses or camera lens to use them.

J Tiers
04-12-2010, 09:52 PM
Glass types are apparently tempered glass, according to my optician..... strong, but can shatter and fill your eyesocket (and whatever shreds are left of your eye) with little cubical glass pieces......

Plastic ones (at least some) are polycarbonate.... you can shoot a .22 into the lens and it won't shatter, but I wouldn't recommend wearing them at the time you do it....

However, I understand that the best types of hardcoating are not compatible with polycarbonate... I have regular glasses that are plastic, non-polycarbonate, and whatever they are coated with is HARD..... not a scratch on them in several years of wearing them even at times I probably should wear S-G.

The key to not scratching them is to never polish them off with a paper towel or any other scratchy thing like that unless you have them wet with water or cleaner. Most all paper towels are scratchy as the dickens.. probably even Bounty. most paper has a significant silica content from the wood it was made from.

Use a glasses cloth instead, the opticians have a microfiber cloth that cleans very well, and after a few weeks you can put it through with the laundry.... No water etc needed with the cloth, it soaks up everything and doesn't smear until its really full. (water is a good plan to safely knock off big stuff like curls of swarf).

I keep one of those cloths in a plastic bag (so it won't get full of junk) at work for cleaning.

Arcane
04-12-2010, 10:01 PM
I clean my spectacles basically the same way rockrat does, except I use a citrus based product (Orange TKO). I just give the specs a shot from a spray bottle on each side of the lenses and then rinse them under hot water, then dry with a bath towel. Always come clean and never a scratch. I used to use Simple Green, but found it left a residue while Orange TKO doesn't.

jugs
04-13-2010, 06:24 AM
I clean my spectacles same way I clean my testicle, in running water with gentle rubbing until any grit is flushed away. I try not to spend any more time on one then the other...

Have you got the balls to tell us what happened to the other :D

Your Old Dog
04-13-2010, 07:26 AM
Have you got the balls to tell us what happened to the other :D

You mean the other two?

Arcane, It was suggested to me years ago not to use hot water but cold instead. As explained to me, the thin glass on eye wear warms up very fast and may scratch easier? I use cold water only on all plastics.

If you want to spend the money, there is a paper product I use to clean slides and optical glass with an eyeglass cleaner from Sears. The napkins are called Photowipes. I think the last box I bought cost $30.00 for 100 wipes. They are about the size of placemat when you unfold them and are multiply. They are used in the film industry to wipe down 16 & 35mm films with a cleaning agent. They leave no lint. For expensive optics I wouldn't reuse them but for glasses and my home cameras I reuse them several times before tossing them.

Looking at this site, it would appear I got robbed on my last box? http://www.berger-bros.com/page/BBCVD/PROD/PREAR0076